Children of the Sea , Vol. 3 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Children of the Sea , Vol. 3 on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Children of the Sea, Vol. 3 [Paperback]

Daisuke Igarashi
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 19.99
Price: CDN$ 14.43 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 5.56 (28%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Friday, August 29? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $8.79  
Paperback CDN $14.43  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

June 15 2010 Children of the Sea (Book 3)
The sea has a story to tell, one you’ve never heard before...

Reads R to L (Japanese Style). The sea has a story to tell, one you’ve never heard before...

Ruka is traumatized when Sora disappears into the night sea right in front of her. But although she refuses to speak of the incident, the meteorite Sora made her swallow is not so silent. It whispers to her from inside her body, and with its guidance she leads Umi and Anglade into the open ocean in search of answers. Surrounded by the sea, Ruka starts to see glimpses of the past that help her understand how Umi, Sora, Jim and Anglade all came to be connected.

Frequently Bought Together

Children of the Sea, Vol. 3 + Children of the Sea , Vol. 2 + Children of the Sea , Vol. 1
Price For All Three: CDN$ 41.12


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

About the Author

Daisuke Igarashi is an award-winning manga creator who began his career in 1993. His series Majo received the Excellence Prize at the 2004 Japan Media Arts Festival and was nominated for the Fauve d'Or Best Comic Book Prize at the 2007 Festival International de la Bande Dessinée d'Angoulême. Little Forest was nominated for the 2006 Osamu Tezuka Cultural Prize. His current series Children of the Sea is the winner of the 38th Japan Cartoonist Award and runs in IKKI magazine.

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
By Nicola Mansfield HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Reason for Reading: Next in the series.

Ruka is in shock over the disappearance of Sora in the last volume and not doing well at all. Umi is also acting strangely and stays close to Ruka now. Anglade, introduced in the last volume, has a long talk with Jim about the sea children and then takes off with Ruka and Umi. Very strange things happen and this volume gets a little confusing with where the story is going. On the other hand, a fair portion of this volume takes place in the past starting with Anglade as a boy, his relationship with Jim, and how the sea children came to be with them. This clears up a lot of the background story and continues to make the story fascinating. A wonderful new character is introduced in the past, an old woman named Dehdeh, whom I hope will turn up again as she seems to know much more than she has told. The original disappearing fish story seems to have a much greater meaning now and Ruka has joined Sora and Umi in having a deep, cosmic relationship with the sea. As I said, the story arc is heading in a direction that is somewhat confusing at this point and I don't want to say anything else to give away any spoilers. Overall, this volume is not as good as the first two but seems to be a pivotal point in the story where the next volume is going to pull some more threads together. I love this series; the theme and plot are so different from any other manga I've read and the artwork is beautifully detailed with people of various ethnic groups represented. Vol. 4 will be released in Dec. of this year ('10).

Re-Read Aug/2013: My original review pretty much says it all about this volume. Only I've been able to follow the story better this time around and have managed to see where the plot is going with the Ruka angle, which has been hinted at from the beginning. Fascinating story, one more volume left to re-read! and I agree with my original rating of 4/5.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Strange and Beautiful June 24 2010
By Ellen W. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Volume 3 of "Children of the Sea" begins as Ruka struggles to process what she saw happen to Sora. Anglade wants to return to where Sora and Umi were found in hopes of discovering their secret, and Ruka and Umi go with him. Ruka seems vacant, almost like half of her is missing. And Sora seems to be speaking to her from beyond the grave... We also get to see Sora and Umi's life before they were captured, how they were caught, and how they came to live with Jim and Anglade.

This was an interesting volume, to say the least, full of bizarre but beautiful imagery. Ruka gets lost at sea (though not in the way you're thinking) at one point, and this sequence is especially evocative. I also loved the scene where Ruka, directed by Sora's voice, and Umi jump ship and go swimming with a pod of false killer whales. As I mentioned, some of the imagery near the end is pretty bizarre, but it's beautiful in its strangeness. It's a little disturbing in places, but that's intentional.

The story is getting pretty esoteric. The beginning was pretty normal, and Ruka's lost at sea sequence, though a bit oddly presented, fit the magical realism of previous volumes. Ruka's vacancy at the beginning is well presented, as is Umi's disconnectedness from this world. It was good to learn more about how Jim and Anglade and Sora and Umi came together. Another character, Dehdeh, an acquaintance of Jim's, is important in this volume. She was an interesting character, but her philosophical waxings are a little overbearing. The real strangeness starts with one of Anglade's past experiences, and Ruka soon has a similar one. These experiences relate to creation myths of certain cultures, myths that are kind of hard to wrap your head around. I'm not sure how I feel about this literalization of these myths. The stories are not the simple "God created the world" kind of myths, and it's hard to imagine them being factual. Of course, "Children of the Sea" is kind of a mythological story itself. At this point, I'm not sure whether some events are literal or spiritual experiences. Even so, I felt the strangeness of this volume detracted from the relative realism of the first two. It's still interesting, though, and I'm not sure where the story's will go from here.

"Children of the Sea" vol. 3 is just as beautiful and atmospheric as the previous two. The story continues to be compelling, though I felt the strangeness near the end didn't fit with the rest. I'm not sure I like the direction the story's taking. Still, I enjoyed this volume for the most part. It's definitely worth buying if you've been following the series.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magical Realism in Comic Book Form July 20 2010
By Art - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I'm loving this series, and I hope there is enough demand to justify publishing it to its conclusion (unlike, say, "Me & the Devil Blues", which was aborted by its English-language publisher after a mere two volumes).

Igarashi has created a compelling fantasy world where nobody really questions why these two kids (raised by manatees) can live underwater, but where deeper mysteries are unfolding at an extremely deliberate pace. Most of this comic is about atmosphere and characterization, and the atmosphere, in particular, is stunning. Igarashi works in a visual style that's a lot different from most manga artists, with a scratchy, uneven line. It took me a little while to warm up to this, but once I did, I was hooked. In particular, the underwater sequences are truly impressive, with a virtuoso use of greyscale to simulate the look of being far underwater (in black & white, no less). He's also extremely effective in several scenes that take place on land during a typhoon.

In short, if you're looking for something a little off-the-beaten-track, I recommend this without reservations. I believe it is available online from Viz Media, so you can check it out first before deciding whether or not you want to buy it.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charming Sept. 13 2013
By Peter T Bergeron - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Beautifully drawn in a rough, yet sophisticated style. A complex story hidden under the surface of a calm sea. Definitely worth a few re-reads.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating tale continued Sept. 4 2013
By B. Sanford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A beautiful story that blends mystery, art, mythology, the sea, and science into one fascinating tale. Book #3 is still a very slow story that progresses very little. The focus shifts to Ruka's new role and reveals more of the of history of Sora and Umi. Although it is slow it is still entertaining. The end of each book always leaves the reader craving more.

>After having read all of the books my verdict is: so worth it.
Love the series.
5.0 out of 5 stars Backstory is Cleared Up while Plot Gets more Mysterious! July 30 2010
By Nicola Mansfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Reason for Reading: Next in the series.

Ruka is in shock over the disappearance of Sora in the last volume and not doing well at all. Umi is also acting strangely and stays close to Ruka now. Anglade, introduced in the last volume, has a long talk with Jim about the sea children and then takes off with Ruka and Umi. Very strange things happen and this volume gets a little confusing with where the story is going. On the other hand, a fair portion of this volume takes place in the past starting with Anglade as a boy, his relationship with Jim, and how the sea children came to be with them. This clears up a lot of the background story and continues to make the story fascinating. A wonderful new character is introduced in the past, an old woman named Dehdeh, whom I hope will turn up again as she seems to know much more than she has told. The original disappearing fish story seems to have a much greater meaning now and Ruka has joined Sora and Umi in having a deep, cosmic relationship with the sea. As I said, the story arc is heading in a direction that is somewhat confusing at this point and I don't want to say anything else to give away any spoilers. Overall, this volume is not as good as the first two but seems to be a pivotal point in the story where the next volume is going to pull some more threads together. I love this series; the theme and plot are so different from any other manga I've read and the artwork is beautifully detailed with people of various ethnic groups represented. Vol. 4 will be released in Dec. of this year ('10).

Re-Read Aug/2013: My original review pretty much says it all about this volume. Only I've been able to follow the story better this time around and have managed to see where the plot is going with the Ruka angle, which has been hinted at from the beginning. Fascinating story, one more volume left to re-read! and I agree with my original rating of 4/5.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback