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Children in the Woods Paperback – Jan 24 1995

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (Jan. 24 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0449909794
  • ISBN-13: 978-0449909799
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.9 x 20.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 277 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,329,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Busch's magical, moving stories cut to the bone, revealing concealed fears, pains and hopes as he surveys the wreckage of fractured families, embattled marriages, ruptured lives. He proffers no neat endings, no assurances. A country doctor whose dog is stolen by a demented marijuana farmer finds himself in the middle of a drug bust ("The Page"). An enormously overweight man who discovers acceptance in the arms of his weekend lover must deal with her violent estranged husband ("The Trouble with Being Food"). Also a novelist ( Long Way from Home ), Busch exploits plot devices brilliantly, as in "Bring Your Friends to the Zoo," in which the contrast between the impersonality of the London Zoo and the heated break-up of an American and his married English lover create tension. Love of another sort fuels "Folk Tales," about a New York psychoanalyst who finds in his deceased mother's safety deposit box a letter he had written as an eight-year-old to Albert Einstein, along with the famed physicist's reply. In these 23 stories from the last two decades, the winner of the 1991 PEN/Malamud award for short fiction shows himself to be a master at exploring the human predicament.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

For readers unfamiliar with Busch's work, this collection of new and selected stories provides an excellent introduction. Older fans will appreciate having some of his best short fiction gathered in one place (at least 18 of the 23 stories have appeared previously in a variety of sources, beginning with the 1974 O. Henry Award winner, "Is Anyone Left This Time of Year?"). Long noted for his adroitness in adopting different personae to explore the vulnerabilities of human existence, Busch is a writer of style and power. As he points out, we are too often "puppets on the fingers of our arguments." This reviewer's favorite tale is "What You Might As Well Call Love," in which a father becomes vividly aware of the fragility of life as he imagines his son being swept away in a raging torrent. His fear and love are emotions we can all understand. It is not for nothing that Busch received the 1991 Pen Malamud Award for short fiction. This work is worthy of addition to even the smallest collections of literary fiction.
- David W. Henderson, Eckerd Coll. Lib., St. Petersburg, Fla.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on Dec 21 2001
Format: Paperback
Yes, there is an eerie quality to these stories, the kind that lies just past the happily-ever-after of so many fairy tales. It is with beautiful prose, a clear eye, and often affecting poignance that Busch expresses the small and large cruelties his characters inflict upon each other, sometimes in the name of love, and sometimes not. Busch masters the complex emotions in these stories without sentimentality or cynicism. This is a wonderful and necessary piece for any literary fiction collection.
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By A Customer on Feb. 24 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a gloomy collection of stories about difficult relationships. Most of the stories are written in the first person, and are to do with infidelities, disappointments and betrayal. There are a few odd themes: sump pumps, wells. The author is at his most touching when writing about dogs: shades of JM Coetzee. There is not a trace of humor in this sour book. Many of the stories are located in upstate New York, a part of the country I will now never visit.
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By A Customer on April 9 2001
Format: Paperback
It has been quite some time since I read this book, but I do remember how powerful the writing is. References to fairy tales are woven throughout these stories, and, as you know, fairy tales can be rather frightening. Giving this book only one star demonstrates one of two things: the reader should be reading only feel-good books, or the reader completely missed the point.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9eff487c) out of 5 stars 5 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9f0112dc) out of 5 stars Selected stories from a master April 8 2006
By James Biques - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This collection was published in 1994 and features about two decades worth of selected stories from the beginning and (what is now the) midpoint of Busch's career. Stories to be read slowly and savored. Busch was a fearlessly observant writer, with the lyrical gifts to express the joys and sorrows of emotional relationships without ever succumbing to morbidity or self-pity. Naturally such a brooding worldview was never rewarded commercially, and Busch's passing in late February of this year received only a fraction of the notice granted at about the same time to Dan Brown's "Da Vinci Code" trial in London. Don't make that mistake; treat yourself to this excellent introduction to his work. Best stories here, in my opinion: The Trouble with Being Food, Critics, Stand and be Recognized, Ralph the Duck, Folk Tales, The Page, Berceuse.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9f011330) out of 5 stars masterful Dec 21 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Yes, there is an eerie quality to these stories, the kind that lies just past the happily-ever-after of so many fairy tales. It is with beautiful prose, a clear eye, and often affecting poignance that Busch expresses the small and large cruelties his characters inflict upon each other, sometimes in the name of love, and sometimes not. Busch masters the complex emotions in these stories without sentimentality or cynicism. This is a wonderful and necessary piece for any literary fiction collection.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It has been quite some time since I read this book, but I do remember how powerful the writing is. References to fairy tales are woven throughout these stories, and, as you know, fairy tales can be rather frightening. Giving this book only one star demonstrates one of two things: the reader should be reading only feel-good books, or the reader completely missed the point.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9f011a38) out of 5 stars About the Author Feb. 27 2006
By Shirley Mills - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Reviewers: For your information "Frederick Busch, who wrote 27 books, died February 23, 2006. He was 64 and lived in Shelburne, NY."

Taken from the Boston Globe.
0 of 10 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a gloomy collection of stories about difficult relationships. Most of the stories are written in the first person, and are to do with infidelities, disappointments and betrayal. There are a few odd themes: sump pumps, wells. The author is at his most touching when writing about dogs: shades of JM Coetzee. There is not a trace of humor in this sour book. Many of the stories are located in upstate New York, a part of the country I will now never visit.


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