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Children of God [Import]

DVD
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: CDN$ 16.41 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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3.0 out of 5 stars Bahamian Inter racial Gay Love Story Sept. 13 2011
By Tommy Dooley HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
This is a full length version of writer and director, Kareem Mortimer's earlier short called `Float. It stars Johnny Ferro as `Jonny' a reclusive scholarship, art student, whose work is lacking in passion. His art teacher thinks he needs some inspiration and so sends him to stay at her home on the Bahamian island of Eleuthera. He is already suffering bullying and homophobia in Nassau, so decides to go. Once there he meets Romeo (Stephen Tyrone Williams) who is also a refugee from Nassau trying to escape the prying attentions of his over bearing mother.

Romeo makes some initial advances on Jonny but is rebuked, undeterred he carries on until he gains his confidence and a relationship - of sorts - begins. There is also a dual plot of the hypocritical, homophobic, preacher, who also likes a bit of cruising himself. His wife, played brilliantly by Margaret Laurena Kemp, has caught a not so social disease and is blaming him; he says she has turned to the devil so she goes off to the same island to see if he will return to save their marriage.

What unfolds exposes deep set homophobia and traditional family set ups based on narrow and ignorant views of Christianity and the Old Testament. There are no new plots here, but what is new is the setting, this was made with the full co-operation of The Bahamas Film Council, and it should be lauded for trying to address the religious ignorance and bigotry which gives support to the lies spread by rampant homophobes.

Where is it let down? Well despite some great acting, there are also some very woeful performances, this is not helped by the video kind of format it has been recorded in, this makes it feel like a day time soap.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  48 reviews
30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Terrific Character Study And Romance Loses Subtlety With Overwrought Religious And Political Subplots June 4 2011
By K. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
At the heart of Kareem Mortimer's "Children of God" are two stories--one of religious intolerance and one of self acceptance. This is perhaps not surprising considering that these two issues tend to be recurrent themes when dealing openly with homosexuality in film (and in life). Mortimer's piece is certainly an easy recommendation, but the two sides of the screenplay don't always rest in an easy alliance. On the one hand, the gentle and surprisingly subtle story of love awakening is expertly done with moments of amazing tenderness and real warmth. Conversely, as the picture attempts to deal with the political and religious aspects of the story--things can be a bit heavy handed. In many ways, I want to say this film is absolutely great and in many ways it is. But when it matters the most, the film gives in to some cliches that were completely unnecessary--including the most expected finale in films trying too hard to make a point. I guess I'm torn because I both loved this movie AND wished for more.

Set in the Bahamas, the story introduces us to a shy art student (Johnny Ferro) grappling with his sexual identity. When he gets out of the city, he meets an alluring new friend (Stephen Tyrone Williams) who helps break down the barriers that he has built around himself. A mass of neurotic tendencies, Ferro is absolutely terrific and understated and is well matched by the appealing Williams. As Ferro starts to accept himself, Williams must also begin to face the expectations placed on him by his family and society in general. This story is so well told and heartfelt and I was completely won over. Concurrently, we meet a religious leader's wife who is leading a movement against homosexual rights. Of course, her hypocritical husband is a closeted man who has given her a venereal disease. How's that for convenient plotting? Everywhere you turn, characters are watching news about the rally and the political movement on television--it must be a monumental thing to be so widely viewed!

After a big confrontation in church, things start to resolve themselves very quickly for everyone involved. But then we get that unfortunate ending. Mortimer opts for a poignant finish that has been telegraphed and used in dozens of other films--and it's a shame really, because prior to that the film really felt like it had a fresh and unique viewpoint. All the actors acquit themselves well, even in the religious subplot where the script pushes far beyond subtlety. I'm certainly not trying to sound discouraging--I loved most of the movie. I happen to think this has many elements of depth and power and had the potential to be a brilliant film. It falls short in the end (for me anyway)--but still remains a significantly accomplished, professional, and well made entry into a genre that needs all the good films it can get. KGHarris, 6/11.
18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Children of God is a revelation. Stephen Tyrone Williams is a find. Bravo to all involved. May 19 2011
By Tom O'Leary - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Originally a wonderful short movie called FLOAT, CHILDREN OF GOD is a moving, thought-provoking, funny and brilliantly poetic love story. Set in the idyllic world of the Bahamas, a blocker painter (Johnny Ferro) searches for inspiration for his painting but instead finds inspiration in the arms of another lost soul (Stephen Tyrone Williams). Director Kareem Mortimer has set this beautiful story in an island paradise. But the characters he has created keep finding ways to keep paradise from coming true for them. The acting in this movie is revelatory. All of he performances are top notch, especially those by Johnny Ferro, Stephen Tyrone Williams and Margaret Laurena Kemp. The camera especially loves the beautiful and sensuous Stephen Tyrone Williams. This movie is a work of art that should be seen by everyone. Bravo to all involved.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Terrific Character Study And Romance Loses Subtlety With Overwrought Religious And Political Subplots June 21 2011
By K. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
At the heart of Kareem Mortimer's "Children of God" are two stories--one of religious intolerance and one of self acceptance. This is perhaps not surprising considering that these two issues tend to be recurrent themes when dealing openly with homosexuality in film (and in life). Mortimer's piece is certainly an easy recommendation, but the two sides of the screenplay don't always rest in an easy alliance. On the one hand, the gentle and surprisingly subtle story of love awakening is expertly done with moments of amazing tenderness and real warmth. Conversely, as the picture attempts to deal with the political and religious aspects of the story--things can be a bit heavy handed. In many ways, I want to say this film is absolutely great and in many ways it is. But when it matters the most, the film gives in to some cliches that were completely unnecessary--including the most expected finale in films trying too hard to make a point. I guess I'm torn because I both loved this movie AND wished for more.

Set in the Bahamas, the story introduces us to a shy art student (Johnny Ferro) grappling with his sexual identity. When he gets out of the city, he meets an alluring new friend (Stephen Tyrone Williams) who helps break down the barriers that he has built around himself. A mass of neurotic tendencies, Ferro is absolutely terrific and understated and is well matched by the appealing Williams. As Ferro starts to accept himself, Williams must also begin to face the expectations placed on him by his family and society in general. This story is so well told and heartfelt and I was completely won over. Concurrently, we meet a religious leader's wife who is leading a movement against homosexual rights. Of course, her hypocritical husband is a closeted man who has given her a venereal disease. How's that for convenient plotting? Everywhere you turn, characters are watching news about the rally and the political movement on television--it must be a monumental thing to be so widely viewed!

After a big confrontation in church, things start to resolve themselves very quickly for everyone involved. But then we get that unfortunate ending. Mortimer opts for a poignant finish that has been telegraphed and used in dozens of other films--and it's a shame really, because prior to that the film really felt like it had a fresh and unique viewpoint. All the actors acquit themselves well, even in the religious subplot where the script pushes far beyond subtlety. I'm certainly not trying to sound discouraging--I loved most of the movie. I happen to think this has many elements of depth and power and had the potential to be a brilliant film. It falls short in the end (for me anyway)--but still remains a significantly accomplished, professional, and well made entry into a genre that needs all the good films it can get. KGHarris, 6/11.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "I Saw The Ending Coming!" Nov. 5 2011
By ADWalk - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I truly enjoyed this movie and I watched it only because it was recommemded. The story line, the plot, I loved, but the ending was predictable. Even real life doesn't always end like that! I wasn't even looking for a "Fairy Tale Ending, " but with all that was put out there, the ending in my opinion could of had a little more depth! Overall, it was a great movie.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Very Close to Perfect Sept. 9 2011
By C. Marshall - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This movie is very satisfying. I almost gave it 5 stars. Finally there is a movie that shows different types of gay people which makes the film more realistic. I was rooting for the female lead character because I really wanted her to come to her senses. She is shown in many lights and I love how real she is even if she is wrong in her beliefs, other than that she is so beautiful and you will grow to love her too, I promise. I love the two main characters who happen to be gay, they display a romance that some people may not expect but you will love them. I read someone's review and saw this movie so I am now also very very glad and excited about this movie. I'm happy I watched it and hopefully someone will watch it because of my review.
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