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Last Hurrah for Chivalry (Dragon Dynasty)(Special Collector's Edition) [Import]


Price: CDN$ 26.62
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Product Details

  • Actors: Damian Lau, Pai Wei, Chiu-hua Wei, Kong Lau, Hark-On Fung
  • Directors: John Woo
  • Writers: John Woo
  • Producers: Raymond Chow
  • Format: Widescreen, NTSC, Import, Subtitled
  • Language: Cantonese Chinese, English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Dragon Dynasty
  • Release Date: July 24 2007
  • Run Time: 107 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000P6R9N0


Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TrezKu13 on Nov. 12 2003
Format: DVD
"Last Hurrah for Chivalry" has a large amount of perhaps one of the most lacking concepts in your average Kung-Fu title: character development. The two main characters, Cheung and Green Shirt, have their own personality, their own issues, and their own life story. When they begin to fight the bad guys you know what mettle of men they are and feel for their quests. You can also feel the partnership between them.
When I first saw this film I was expecting casual Kung-Fu fair along the lines of the "Wu Tang" titles, but I was pleasantly surprised. The action is well choreographed and almost realistic (with some stylized exceptions), and most of the fighting is sword-play, not chop suey. Sword fighting fanatics take heed!
The subtitles for this really helped, too, in clearing up some points that I didn't understand in the English dub. Ever wondered what was written on Prey's fan? Now you do. You also hear the lyrics of the main theme, and it makes all the more sense when you know what the singer is saying. Besides, a film as grand as this really doesn't deserve being dubbed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Who 1 on June 18 2003
Format: DVD
It's not just another Kung Fu flick. It's John Woo. The stars are the familiar cast of old school Action / Black Belt / Kung Fu Theater shows, but the plot and cinematography are uniquely John Woo. The movie is a must for Kung Fu fans. The swordplay in the movie is not as fluid as in the 90's Kung Fu movies, but the movie still stands out as one of the all time greatest sword-fighting movies. Another, movie I would highly recommend is the Kid With the Golden Arms.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 31 2002
Format: DVD
This movie has plot twists you don't normally find in a martial arts movie. Two mens' paths cross and they are hurled toward a destiny neither could have foreseen. I guess you could call it a martial arts triangle of sorts (like a love triangle, but martial arts). An assassin who drinks to forget his bad deeds. A prostitute who loves him. A martial arts expert struggling with his own fears. This is a keeper. Great martial arts action and a unique story. Definitely one for the martial arts collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Juan Pablo Gonzalez on Oct. 10 2001
Format: DVD
John Woo has a unique style, which you can check in this 1979 film, long time before Face/Off or MI2. The film has an excellent plot, with classical honor conflicts and friendship, and lots of action, with scenes that make Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon look older...
The DVD edition has good picture quality and the sound is excellent, with Dolby Digital (rare for a 20 years old film!).
If you like HK cinema, this is a must for your collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Juan Pablo Gonzalez on Aug. 27 2001
Format: DVD
There are probably 10 minutes in the film with no action...one of the best kung-fu films I've seen, with an excellent plot and full of action. This is what makes these kind of film so interesting, a honor and friedship problem, resolved via kung-fu. Any way, the film is very different from modern John Woo's filmography, so don't expect a Hard Target or Face/Off kind of film. This film is quite more deep and not filled with hi-tech fx, but when you think it was filmed in 1978, the fx are surprising...
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Format: DVD
I'm no John Woo Fan, but I never get sick of watching this over & over. Good plot, great costumes, an overly suggestive & touching relationship between 2 attractive guys, almost no crappy special effects at all, it's really ammusing at times, & the dubb is actually good,which is in itself a miracle.
Other reccomendations:
*Twin Warriors (Jet Li)
*Curse of the Undead Youma (aka Blood Reign)<anime>
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Format: DVD
Last Hurrah for Chivalry, despite its cheesy English title, is important for two things: One, it broke new ground in period martial-arts films by its use of contemporary language and attitudes; two, it introduces many quintessential John Woo stylistic conceits, thematic elements, and cinematic devices.
The anachronistic speech patterns and occasionally bad humour are not to everybody's taste. However, what it does achieve for the film is a sense of intimacy for the characters missing from Woo's previous films, such as Hand of Death. The use of the Cantonese language brings Last Hurrah for Chivalry down to an earthy level, allowing the actors to loosen up. In the case of Wei Pai and Liu Sung Yen, this is really a good thing, freeing them up to express their characters better.
Woo's signatures begin to emerge very clearly in this film. The characters of Cheung the Third and Green Robe are really precursors to character pairings in later Woo films such as Jeff and Eagle Lee (The Killer), Potcake and Jim (Once a Thief), and most important, Ho and Mark/Ken from the A Better Tomorrow series. Just the interplay between Wei and Liu along is worth the whole film, Wei's earnest naivete and Liu's engrossing mix of drunken clowning and deadly silence making for some of the best character interactions in the Woo oeuvre, rivalling that of Chow Yun-fat and Ti Lung in A Better Tomorrow. The over-the-top sound design and hair-raising fight choreography give the fight sequences a real sense of danger, while the themes of honour, betrayal, despair and fate are lifted intact and incorporated into the Killer, right down the the ending.
In fact, the only fault of this film is its moments of crude humour, usually thanks to bad bit players (eg. the henchmen of the villain Bai Zhong Tang). Still, Last Hurrah for Chivalry is one of Woo's best early films.
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