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Chocolat Movie Tie In Paperback – Nov 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks; Mti edition (Nov. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014100018X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141000183
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 1.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (91 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,489,724 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Vianne Rocher and her 6-year-old daughter, Anouk, arrive in the small village of Lansquenet-sous-Tannes--"a blip on the fast road between Toulouse and Bourdeaux"--in February, during the carnival. Three days later, Vianne opens a luxuriant chocolate shop crammed with the most tempting of confections and offering a mouth-watering variety of hot chocolate drinks. It's Lent, the shop is opposite the church and open on Sundays, and Francis Reynaud, the austere parish priest, is livid.

One by one the locals succumb to Vianne's concoctions. Joanne Harris weaves their secrets and troubles, their loves and desires, into her third novel, with the lightest touch. There's sad, polite Guillame and his dying dog; thieving, beaten-up Joséphine Muscat; schoolchildren who declare it "hypercool" when Vianne says they can help eat the window display--a gingerbread house complete with witch. And there's Armande, still vigorous in her 80s, who can see Anouk's "imaginary" rabbit, Pantoufle, and recognizes Vianne for who she really is. However, certain villagers--including Armande's snobby daughter and Joséphine's violent husband--side with Reynaud. So when Vianne announces a Grand Festival of Chocolate commencing Easter Sunday, it's all-out war: war between church and chocolate, between good and evil, between love and dogma.

Reminiscent of Herman Hesse's short story "Augustus," Chocolat is an utterly delicious novel, coated in the gentlest of magic, which proves--indisputably and without preaching--that soft centers are best. --Lisa Gee, Amazon.co.uk --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The battle lines between church and chocolate are drawn by this British (and part French) author in her appealing debut about a bewitching confectioner who settles in a sleepy French village and arouses the appetites of the pleasure-starved parishioners. Young widow Vianne Roche's mouthwatering bonbons, steaming mugs of liqueur-laced cocoa and flaky cream-filled patisserie don't earn her a warm welcome from the stern prelate of Lansquenet-sous-Tannes. In Francis Reynaud's zeal to enforce strict Lenten vows of self-denial, he regards his sybaritic neighbor with suspicion and disdain. Undaunted, Vianne garners support from the town's eccentrics, chiefly Armande Voizin, the oldest living resident, a self-professed sorceress who senses in Vianne a kindred spirit. A fun-loving band of river gypsies arrives, and a colorful pageant unfurls. The novel's diary form?counting down the days of Lent until Easter?is suspenseful, and Harris takes her time unreeling the skein of evil that will prove to be Reynaud's undoing. As a witch's daughter who inherited her mother's profound distrust of the clergy, Vianne never quite comes to life, but her child, Anouk, is an adorable sprite, a spunky six-year-old already wise to the ways of an often inhospitable world. Gourmand Harris's tale of sin and guilt embodies a fond familiarity with things French that will doubtless prove irresistible to many readers. Rights sold in the U.K., Germany, Canada, Sweden, Holland, Spain, Italy, Finland, Denmark, Brazil, Israel, Norway, Greece, the Czech Republic, Poland.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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We came on the wind of the carnival. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By V. Marshall on May 18 2004
Format: Paperback
I watched the movie "Chocolat" a year or so ago and found myself amazed at the sensuality of this little story. So I decided to read the book although I felt I knew the story.
Joanne Harris is a brilliant story teller with such admiration for the senses that she pulls her readers into a land of sensory overload where you want to reside forever. The book is different than the movie (isn't this always the case?) but just as entertaining. The delicate prose and romantic verse keep you interested until the very end and then for days and days afterwards. I dare you to read this tale and not find yourself sipping wine and cocoa while being tempted by all the chocolate. France will be calling your name!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Allyson Hominski on May 13 2004
Format: Paperback
Chocolat by Joanne Harris was an exceptionally well written novel and now one of my favorites. I particularly enjoyed the journal format of the book between the two protagonists, Vianna and Reynaud. The book has a fairytale like sensation centered around the magical touch of Vianne. Her mystique of people's sense and chocolate is mesmerizing. The contrasts of masculine and femininie support the novel well, as well as the struggle between Vianne and the church. The ending caught me by surprise and it sure is the unexpected. Chocolat is a heart warming and enjoyable story. The only downfall: the intense chocolate cravings the whole time you read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Debbie Lee Wesselmann on July 12 2004
Format: Paperback
In this lusciously mystical novel, Vianne Rocher and her young daughter Anouk arrive in a small French village on Mardi Gras. Vianne, the daughter of a gypsy and a wanderer herself, sets up her chocolate shop during the most austere of Christian seasons, Lent, thus infuriating the local priest who knows his parishioners will struggle with their Lenten vows. Vianne turns out to be a not-so-ordinary shopkeeper, and Reynaud the priest is not the holy man he pretends. As Vianne befriends the down-trodden, including a band of gypsies, her force in the village becomes as powerful as Reynaud feared.
With its tantalizing descriptions, this book will have readers dreaming of the finest chocolates and confections. The language can be at times self-conscious and overblown, but the overall effect is mesmerizing, thanks to Harris's visual style and attention to detail. The biggest flaw of this otherwise skilled first novel is the unsatisfying ending and the one-dimensional way Vianne connects emotionally with the gypsies. These forced elements can be forgiven, however, given the moving lyricism of the rest.
CHOCOLAT is a beautiful but flawed work that offers much more than the average novel. If you haven't already read this and are a fan of magic realism, you should pick it up. You won't be disappointed.
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By Julie on May 13 2004
Format: Paperback
Chocolat by Joanne Harris can be depicted as an inspirational novel. Vianne Rocher, the main character, is a unique woman who will not conform to the ways of society. This is an amazing story that relates to happiness, sorrow and romance. Harris reflects Vianne as a woman worthy of praise. Vianne easily disregards the opinions of society. She is deeply rooted in her own morals and beliefs. The author captures the spirit of the characters as well as fulfilling the beauty and magic of the town. She also provides vivid descriptions and images of the townspeople and their reactions to Vianne and her daughter Anouk. However nothing compares to the images the author provides when Vianne is brewing up her famous chocolate recipes. My favorite scene was the arrival Roux. I knew something special was going to happen between him and Vianne. Joanne Harris is more than capable of grabbing the reader's attention, in fact she is able to leave their emotions rising and falling with every turn of the page.
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By Julie on May 13 2004
Format: Paperback
Chocolat by Joanne Harris can be depicted as an inspirational novel. Vianne Rocher, the main character, is a unique woman who will not conform to the ways of society. This is an amazing story that relates to happiness, sorrow and romance. Harris reflects Vianne as a woman worthy of praise. Vianne easily disregards the opinions of society. She is deeply rooted in her own morals and beliefs. The author captures the spirit of the characters as well as fulfilling the beauty and magic of the town. She also provides vivid descriptions and images of the townspeople and their reactions to Vianne and her daughter Anouk. However nothing compares to the images the author provides when Vianne is brewing up her famous chocolate recipes. My favorite scene was the arrival Roux. I knew something special was going to happen between him and Vianne. Joanne Harris is more than capable of grabbing the reader's attention, in fact she is able to leave their emotions rising and falling with every turn of the page.
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By Carolina on May 11 2004
Format: Paperback
I must admit I saw the movie before I read the book, but liked the book much more. Joanne Harris knew the romance between Vianne and Roux (respectively played by Juliette Binoche and Johnie Depp in the movie) was not an important factor in this story, only Hollywood's little addy, and undoubtedly the reason for people saying the movie was better.
Harris writes in an entrancing manor which is not only evocative in her descriptions of Vianne's Aztec chocolate recipes, but it leaves an impression of the exotic, appealing, and surreal nature of Vianne Rocher's character. Vianne is the epitome of a wanderer with her little daughter Anouk, but in their wanderings they come across many people who's lives they touch. The persuit of belonging is a predominant theme as well as not being afraid to be different and possess some mystery (it's so much more interesting).
Description of chocolate has never been so vividly mouth-watering as in this book, and with its promotion of indulgence, makes one want to savor its taste long afterwords. No wonder even the priest is forced to live a little (what harm is there in that?)
The witchlike characteristics of Vianne and Anouk (as well as Armande Voizin) not only appall the enemy villagers who rebel against her Paganistic rituals, it makes the reader incredibly curious for more hints of supersticion, fortune-telling, or mind-reading eminent in Vianne. The north-wind's blowing, and allusions to the "black man" also add to this enchanting tale of two wanderers who defy the black man in hopes to find somewhere they can settle in.
A must-read, especially while on vacation, and be sure to bring chocolates with you!!
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