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Choose Peace: A Dialogue Between Johan Galtung and Daisaku Ikeda Paperback – Sep 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Pluto Pr (September 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745310397
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745310398
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.1 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,308,478 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

'The present dialogue betwen these two eminent thinkers is fascinating and often profound, covering a broad spectrum of intellectual moral and spiritual issues. The dialogue is itself an illustration in miniature of what Ikeda means by 'diverse cultures coexisting in a symbiotic state of mutual respect', which he hopes will become symbolic of the 21st century. Peace researchers should find this illustratiojn challenging but eminently inspiring.' --Journal of Peace Research

About the Author

Johan Galtung founded the International Peace Research Institute in Oslo in 1959 and is the author of many essays and works on peace. Currently Professor of Peace Studies at six universities, he is the holder of the Right Livelihood Award 1987 and the Norwegian Humanist Prize 1988. Daisaku Ikeda is a leading figure in the international Buddhist movement, president of the Buddhist lay organisation Soka Gakkai International (SGI)and founder of the Institute of Oriental Philosophy and Soka University. His publications include Choose Life: A Dialogue with Arnold Toynbee (Oxford University Press, 1976)

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Format: Paperback
Galtung and Ikeda's book "Choose Peace" elaborates on humane strategies towards resolving complex global issues such as Nuclear arms buildup and third world affairs. It goes on to highlight the important role that the United Nations can play in quelling (from a soft power standpoint) these burgeoning problems. It stresses specific non-agressive and humane answers such as world dialogue and international cooperation. It also offers food for thought on a variety of social interests/human rights issues. It looks at these issues from an all inclusive perspective rather than a cost benefit analysis. It examines the effects of these issues from a world perspective. From page one I was already rexamining many of my opinions and prevconcieved notions regarding topics such as capital punishment and global conflict resolution. I would greatly recommend this book, as it challeges the reader to reevaluate the tried and true and reflect on society's ills from a symbiotic global vantage point.
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Format: Paperback
"Choose Peace", written by Soka Gakkai International President and University of Hawaii professor Johan Galtung, attempts to provide salient insights and attainable, non-violent solutions to regional and world conflicts. In attempting to identify the derivation of conflict and world "instability" the authors set the parameters of their discussion around such conventional topics as religious fundamentalism,nuclear and conventional arms proliferation, capital punishment, and the reform of the United Nations.
Thoroughly glossed over in the discussion in "Choose Peace" is the role of the Third World, either in a reformed, democraticized United Nations or its continuing subjugation under the neo-liberal economic policies forced on it by the First World.
Bounded by the need to proselytize the phlegmatic role that Soka Gakkai Buddhism has in proffering salient solutions to the world's conflicts, "Choose Peace" is a disappointment when compared to such perspicacious contributions to peace as The South Commission's "Challenge to the South" or Ed Garcia's "A Distant Peace : Human Rights and People's Participation in Conflict Resolution."
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By A Customer on June 2 2000
Format: Paperback
In this book, "Choose Peace: A Dialogue Between Johan Galtung and Daisaku Ikeda," world-renowned professor of peace studies at the University of Hawaii and founder of the International Peace Research Institute, Dr. Johan Galtung, and Daisaku Ikeda, Buddhist scholar and current president of Soka Gakkai International, the world's largest Buddhist organization, explore the interface between Buddhist philosophy and nonviolent solutions to war and political conflict. The two scholars share various painful memories of growing up during World War II. Mr. Ikeda suffered illness as well as the loss of his dear older brother who died in combat, adding to the anguish his family sufferred. In Dr. Galtung's case, during the Nazi occupation of his homeland, Norway, Dr. Galtung's father was imprisoned in a concentration camp in retaliation for his resistance activities.
Their shared quest inspires concrete proposals that are directly relevant to conflict resoulution today, including such hot topics as the death penalty, nationalism and regional unification, religious fundamentalism, the proliferation of nuclear arms, and the role of the United Nations in peacekeeping around the world.
"Choose Peace" is presented as a dialogue between these two scholars, and identifies the various sources of violence and unrest, while demonstrating the role of Buddhist philosophy in formulating solutions that will lead to lasting peace.
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By A Customer on June 1 2000
Format: Paperback
In this book, "Choose Peace: A Dialogue Between Johan Galtung and Daisaku Ikeda," world-renowned professor of peace studies at the University of Hawaii and founder of the International Peace Research Institute, Dr. Johan Galtung, and Daisaku Ikeda, Buddhist scholar and current president of Soka Gakkai International, the world's largest Buddhist organization, explore the interface between Buddhist philosophy and nonviolent solutions to war and political conflict.
The two scholars share various painful memories of growing up during World War II. Mr. Ikeda suffered illness as well as the loss of his dear older brother who died in combat, adding to the anguish his family sufferred. In Dr. Galtung's case, during the Nazi occupation of his homeland, Norway, Dr. Galtung's father was imprisoned in a concentration camp in retaliation for his resistance activities.
Their shared quest inspires concrete proposals that are directly relevant to conflict resoulution today, including such hot topics as the death penalty, nationalism and regional unification, religious fundamentalism, the proliferation of nuclear arms, and the role of the United Nations in peacekeeping around the world.
"Choose Peace" is presented as a dialogue between these two scholars, and identifies the various sources of violence and unrest, while demonstrating the role of Buddhist philosophy in formulating solutions that will lead to lasting peace.
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