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Chronicles of Narnia Last Battl Ab Audio Cassette – Apr 5 2004

4.6 out of 5 stars 125 customer reviews

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Audio Cassette, Apr 5 2004
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Canada / UK Narnia (April 5 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007172567
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007172566
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 125 customer reviews
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Product Description

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-8-With Eustace and Jill at his side, the King, the noble unicorn Jewel, and a few remaining loyal subjects must stand fast against the powers of evil and darkness and fight The Last Battle to decide the future of this once glorious kingdom.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"The magic of C. S. Lewis's parallel universe never fades." The Times

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I thought it timely, in light of the controversy surrounding another "End Times" story, to remark on this most remarkable of C.S. Lewis' Narnia Chronicles. This satisfying series conclusion illustrates Lewis' brilliant analysis of Biblical prophesy in a touching story children of God can all look to with anticipation ("...Amen. Come, Lord Jesus." Rev. 22:20b).
This is the story of Armaggedon; the conflict between anti-Christ (anti-Aslan) and the great masses of inhabitants of lost Narnia deceived by him and doomed for eternity versus the ultimate salvation of the few true followers of Aslan to eternal life in His Country, the True Narnia. The allegory to Scriptural truth is remarkable as illustrated by this most insightful, genius mind of modern-day Christian apologists.
The high point of the story occurs after the destruction of the old world and the lost souls who rejected Aslan, who are dispatched allegorically in Revelations 20, "lake of fire" fashion. The heroes of the story, including all the key players from the earlier Chronicles, are seen trying out their new "resurrection" bodies exploring the most beautiful place ever imagined, thrilled to have Aslan with them. They find after a while that the beautiful country is actually Narnia, the REAL Narnia. Though the Narnia they knew and loved was perceived most wonderful, it was a mere shadow of the perfect New Narnia, the one that would last forever, always with Him present and providing all the light in the never-ending Day.
For believers in Christ, Lewis has projected a clear picture mortal minds can comprehend of how it might be on that Day. It is shown through a children's story because that is how we must come to Him; like a child. "You must become just like a child to enter the Kingdom of God".
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Format: Paperback
The Last Battle is the last in the series of Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis, and my personal favorite. Most people think this book is for children, but I think many people can enjoy it, as it can be understood on many levels. For example, a child may appreciate this story as a group of kids on a fun adventure. I, however, really got a lot of spiritual meaning out of this book, as I found a lot of biblical parallels. In this book, the children are battling the greatest evil to exist in Narnia since the White Witch. A cunning ape and his lackey Puzzle (a donkey) find a lion skin in the river. The greedy ape convinces Puzzle to dress up in it and convince the Narnians that he is great Aslan the Lion, king of Narnia. Through Puzzle, Shift the ape exploits the Narnians devotion to Aslan by giving cruel orders that will only profit Shift. Out of fear, the animals follow his orders. "Aslan" invites the enemy Calormene army into the land to help him rule the country. The animals at this point turn to the real Aslan, and the people he sent (all the humans from the previous books in the series) to save them, but there wasn't much they could do Aslan came just in time however, bringing with him the final Judgment Day. The good creatures left Narnia through a lone standing door frame and entered into a magnificent place of which I haven't space to describe the magnitude of its beauty. The evil were rejected, and Narnia began to fold in on itself, much the way it had formed in The Magician's Nephew. Once in this paradise, the children are told that they were here after having been pulled by Aslan into Narnia after their Earthly deaths.Read more ›
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2007
Format: Paperback
The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.

After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).

Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.

"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.

And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.

Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before.
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