CDN$ 107.73 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by M and N Media Canada
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Chushingura (Widescreen)


Price: CDN$ 107.73
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by M and N Media Canada.
5 used from CDN$ 57.81

Product Details

  • Actors: Yûzô Kayama, Chûsha Ichikawa, Tatsuya Mihashi, Akira Takarada, Yôsuke Natsuki
  • Directors: Hiroshi Inagaki
  • Writers: Toshio Yasumi
  • Producers: Hiroshi Inagaki, Edward Landberg, Sanezumi Fujimoto, Tomoyuki Tanaka
  • Format: Color, Dubbed, DVD-Video, Letterboxed, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: eOne Films
  • Release Date: Nov. 4 2003
  • Run Time: 207 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000056NWP
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #50,914 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: DVD
This is one of the best movies about samurais anywhere and provides a masterful telling of the 47 ronin story. It is a shame that the dvd picture quality does not do the movie justice. The movie deserves a good print and this is not it. You'd think for the price Image Entertainment would do better.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Feb. 14 2004
Format: DVD
The technical quality of this DVD is dreadful. Images go out of focus, they lack detail, they show interlacing artefacts, and movement is often jerky. It looks like a bad copy from a VHS.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: DVD
I first saw this film in the 60's in a small theater over 3 hours with one intermission. I never left my seat, in fact I started out sitting in the aisle at the back because the theater was full.
The photography is gorgeous with brilliant winter scenes backing up intense sword fights in which you aren't sure what happened until someone keels over dead.
Political betrayal is revenged while honor ultimately prevails. You are immersed in the feudal Japanese world and yet reminded of much the same thing happening today.
Definitely worth seeing and buying once you've seen it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: DVD
Chusingura (the 47 Ronin) is a tale that is as popular in Japan -and as often produced - as The Christmas Carol is in the U.S. - and just as revealing of cultural assumptions about right and wrong. There are many versions, each focusing on one of the "47 masterless Samurai" who refuse to surrender and face disgrace out of loyalty to their master. The theme (and story) will be familiar because it's been reworked many times ranging from Gilbert and Sullivan's "Mikado" to "From Here to Eternity."
If you want to gain insight into the Japanese concept of loyalty and the price of honor above all else this is the one movie you should not miss.
The color photgraphy and scene settings are well done and sound is excellent; the acting is also very good and does not lean heavily on over-emoting that is the sometimes "norm" for Japanese films. Sub-titles are a little light, but easy enough to see and this is one of the more accessible versions (many are not available to Western audiences as more recently they tend to be done for annual TV specfials. You won't need to know the history to follow the story - or get the point.
It's a true story of a proud, old fashioned country Samurai who puts the Samurai Code and personal integrity above politics of reality. He's summoned to the Shogun's castle to do his duty - service to the emperor whole messengers are coming through the territory. A corrupt court official expects and demands a bribe to tell the Samurai what he must know of intricate protocol and is outraged when our hero refuses to bend. The official goads him into drawing his sword in the castle - a capital offense, leading to his forced harikiri - suicide.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: DVD
Corruption and the samurai code converge in a collision when an old man who favors greed and lust crosses the road with a young noble samurai. The collision triggers a chain of events that causes the young noble samurai to violate the laws of the Shogunate, which affects many lives. The issue of injustice remains unresolved after the unlawful event. However, for some life is insignificant when injustice remains. This epic story reveals that humans do know what is right from wrong, but fear and desire seem to influence each and everyone's choice.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: DVD
Despite the film's division into two parts, I think the Chushingura is best understood as a complicated story told in three acts.
The first act, culminating in the seppuku of Lord Asano, details the conflict between the young lord and Kira, the Shogun's master of ceremonies, and is, in my opinion, the most interesting as it unfolds logically, tragically, and inevitably towards the spilling of blood in the Shogun's castle. Asano and Kira, at least in this stage of the film, are fully realized and three-dimensional characters, and their conflict can be understood on several levels: idealism versus pragmatism; rural versus urban; and, most centrally, a conflict between different conceptions of honor. Kira is slighted because Asano won't show him the deference he feels he deserves, and Asano cannot accept Kira's attempt to teach him a lesson without fatally wounding his pride. The characters feel real because the situation is developed so carefully, and we as viewers understand why the principal actors behave as they do.
I think the movie bogs down a bit in the second act where the retainers of Asana plot their revenge on Kira. I also feel it is at this point that those unfamiliar with this story may find it difficult to follow the plot. Like the assassination of Thomas Becket in 12th century England, the story of the 47 loyal retainers has left the historian with not only a wealth of primary documents but also of contemporary analysis of exactly how the events were interpreted. Whereas Becket's murder resonated because of the changing perceptions of the limits of temporal power in medieval Europe, the 47 ronin reflect the changing nature of samurai honor following the pacification of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback