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Civil War in Apacheland: Sergeant George Hand's Diary, 1861-1864 Paperback – May 1996


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: High Lonesome Books (May 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 094438336X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0944383360
  • Product Dimensions: 22.5 x 14.8 x 1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 367 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Product Description

Review

The California Column created Civil War history as it marched across Arizona and into New Mexico, conquering both. Still, it never really had its spokesman until High-Lonesome Books decided to publish Sergeant George Hand's Diary. In graphic, soldier terms it records the day-to-day brutal, disgusting, often humorous and always riveting, saga of the life, times, dreams and nightmares of a Union man and a toiling, misfit army. -- Leon C. Metz

The California Volunteers played a pivotal role in New Mexico and Arizona during the Civil War. George Hand's observations are both sprightly and historically valuable. This is an important contribution to both the history and the literature of the American Southwest. -- Robert M. Utley

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
This is the edited journal of a Yankee soldier in El Paso,
Texas and Mesilla, New Mexico during the Civil War.
George Hand was literate and this gives the perspective
of an enlisted man. This talks of southern sympathizers
living in El Paso (Franklin) and across the Rio Grande
in Mexico. Good read if you like Primary Source material
on the Civil War in the West. Same author as "Whiskey,
Six-Guns, and Red Light Ladies." The latter book is
Hand's life in Tucson, AZ 1875-1878
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Primary historical source of Civil War, El Paso and Mesilla Sept. 20 1996
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the edited journal of a Yankee soldier in El Paso,
Texas and Mesilla, New Mexico during the Civil War.
George Hand was literate and this gives the perspective
of an enlisted man. This talks of southern sympathizers
living in El Paso (Franklin) and across the Rio Grande
in Mexico. Good read if you like Primary Source material
on the Civil War in the West. Same author as "Whiskey,
Six-Guns, and Red Light Ladies." The latter book is
Hand's life in Tucson, AZ 1875-1878
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Revelations, or what Grandpa did during the war. March 3 2010
By Epona - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought the book because it mentions my Great-Great Grandfather, who drove a team of oxen to California, became a "miner 49er" and then joined a volunteer Infantry brigade known later as the California Column.

Like many amateur family tree compilers, I knew family stories, but no details. The book is a diary of the hard life of the men sent to drive the Confederates out of the southwest, and to fight various Indian tribes. I was fascinated, and read the book in a couple of days.

Beware of ancestor worship. I was repulsed by many of the stories. The book reveals Northern prejudices and callous behavior not in tune with current beliefs, and I don't recommend the book for children. However, it was wonderful to read about the real lives, and the sacrifices made by ordinary people who believed in a cause. I'd bet that soldiers in the Middle East right now would empathize with the author.

Finally, the book itself arrived in great condition, and has many photos, maps and illustrations from the Civil War, including some by Frederic Remington.


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