Classic Sourdoughs, Revised: A Home Baker's Handbook and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 16.60
  • List Price: CDN$ 22.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.39 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Classic Sourdoughs, Revised: A Home Baker's Handbook Paperback – Jul 12 2011


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 16.60
CDN$ 11.64 CDN$ 13.49

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Frequently Bought Together

Classic Sourdoughs, Revised: A Home Baker's Handbook + The Bread Baker's Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread + Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day: Fast and Easy Recipes for World-Class Breads
Price For All Three: CDN$ 66.76


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press; 3rd Revised edition edition (July 12 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1607740079
  • ISBN-13: 978-1607740070
  • Product Dimensions: 18.6 x 1.3 x 23.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #151,566 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Praise for the PREVIOUS edition

“[The] new edition of Wood’s classic global explorations of wild yeast is a big event
in the baking world and a must for sourdough fans.” 
—The Arizona Republic

“Brings the tradition of sourdough cooking into focus. It is easy, interesting reading and doesn’t make sourdough baking seem complicated.” 
—Sharon Maasdam, The Oregonian

About the Author

ED WOOD, MD, PhD, is a physician and research scientist whose quest for ancient sourdough cultures began in Saudi Arabia, where he served as a chairman of pathology at a Riyadh hospital. He returned to the United States with a bevy of sourdough cultures and began blending the art of baking with the rigor of science. He and his wife, JEAN WOOD, founded Sourdoughs International, which ships sourdough cultures from Cascade, Idaho, to seventy-eight countries around the world.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Grandma TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 12 2013
Format: Paperback
As a long-time (more than a half-century) bread baker and sourdough afficionado, I truly looked forward to Ed Wood's Classic Sourdoughs Revised: A Home Baker's Handbook. I was rather disappointed. Classic Sourdoughs reads like an academic treatise. Beginning home bakers will not find it an easy task to dig out the truly pertinent information that they need to know - much of which simply is not present.

I found the statement "As you embark on your work with sourdoughs" (page 25) extremely off-putting. I don't bake bread for WORK and don't encourage others to either. I bake for enjoyment, to save money, to relieve stress, to be able to serve something that I cannot easily acquire otherwise. "Exploration" would have been a far better choice of word.

As to the "handbook" aspect of Classic Sourdoughs, Ed gives very minimal directions for capturing a wild yeast, includes none of the work-arounds developed by other authorities such as King Arthur Flour, and then mostly gives any possible questions a home baker might have a complete brush off. I would expect a handbook to answer questions like:

"I'm moving. How can I best transport my sourdough?"

"I want to send some sourdough to my sister in California. How can I do that?"

"Can a wild yeast only be captured on a wheat starter?"

Ed Wood answers none of these things. He completely fails to mention the rye starters on which so many of the Central European breads depend and brushes off potato starter, the basis of the classic American Salt Rising Bread. His answer to problems capturing your first wild yeast is to simply dump the starter and try again.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By jessica on Feb. 20 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This bread with Perter Reinharts "the baker apprentice" are my best inspiration for great bread It is far from being 5 minutes a day but with practice you create yoursef a routine and will bake the best bread ever
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 107 reviews
117 of 118 people found the following review helpful
best sourdough reference hands down July 19 2011
By Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I looked at many other sourdough cookbooks and only found one other that did not list recipes asking for commercial bakers yeast. I wanted real sourdough recipes so selected this book and "Wild Bread: Hand-baked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen" by Lisa Rayner. This book has far more recipes than the book by Lisa Rayner. It is nice to have both selections but if I had to select only one, this would be the one I would pick and is the one I recommend to close friends just getting started using sourdough. The recipe selection is fantastic.

The only thing I could see missing from this book was dessert items but those can be found on the web. The chocolate sourdough cake recipe offered by King Arthur Flour Company's web-site is very good as long as you know they are looking for starter with a thick pancake batter consistency.

I was really glad to have a copy of this book after getting my starter. It really helped answer the question of, "Now what do I do with it?" I am very anxious to try the waffle recipes. I can say the pizza dough recipe turned out better than the previous recipes I have tried and the challah recipe makes one huge challah.

I don't see a need for the proofing box Wood recommends, particularly during the warmer months but otherwise I am loving this book. He does not suggest fancy equiptment and the recipes so far have been excellent.

Honestly, a canning jar with starter and a copy of this book would be an excellent gift for those who enjoy baking and those who enjoy a healthy lifestyle.

Update: Jan 2013, still using this book and a Danish dough wisk and the King Arthur flour sourdough starter stored in the King Arthur sourdough crock. I mostly use the no knead recipe as it is so easy with a Danish dough wisk. The wisk was an amazon purchase too.
50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
A great starter July 27 2011
By William Steck - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Had been baking my own bread for a couple of years and wanted to try baking with true sourdoughs. With this book and the Sanfrancisco starter sold on the author's website, was able to activate the starter and bake some wonderful breads. Don't think I'll ever be going back to baking with commercial yeast.

The book was quite readable and contained information that you just won't easily find anywhere else. Wood discusses different grains, gives tips on how to bring your starter back if it goes south, describes different starters, and provides a nice collection of recipes. If you are going to experiment with sourdough, this is a book you'll turn to again and again.

As an aside, the San Francisco sourdough culture makes a great bread, but I'm itching to try the Russian starter that according to Wood works well with whole wheat. Will update this review once I receive that order and turn out a few trial loaves.

Hard pressed to say if this book, or the one by Lisa Rayner is the absolute best one on the market for sourdoughs. They both have their great points. I'd go out on a limb though and say that if I could buy just one, this would be it. Read the book, order a starter. You'll soon be enjoying breads with wonderful crust and a chewy texture that just can't be duplicated with commercial yeast.

Update: One of the big challenges for me is making a palatable whole wheat bread with more than 50% whole wheat. Anything more than that and it's likely you will get a heavy, flat, dense bread. My San Francisco sourdough had that limitation as well. Last week I tried a Russian sourdough culture. Made two loaves that were 100% whole wheat. The loaves rose well and were not dense. For me that's a big milestone. Now I want to go from a completely whole wheat bread to incorporating the ancient grains such as Einkorn, Emmer, and Spelt. Should be even better for me, nutrition wise. (Emmer and Spelt IIRC have higher amounts of proteins, phosphorous, and etc.)
36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Still my favorite sourdough book! Aug. 7 2011
By Mimmi Deutsch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an excellent reference for home bakers who want to understand how to create authentic sourdough breads. It's not complicated and does not require any special equipment. The original edition of this book has long been one of my favorites, and I really like the updated information in the revised edition.

One of the biggest improvements is the simplified directions in the chapter "Putting It All Together". In my opinion this is the heart of the book. In just a few pages it explains very clearly what is happening in your sourdough culture and how to handle it correctly. It made me a better baker, and I am having more fun experimenting with recipes and adapting them to my taste.

Another great addition is the "No-Knead Sourdough" recipe section. I was intrigued by the simplicity of the basic recipe. It worked beautifully for me. And with a slight adjustment to the loaf proof (lower temperature, longer time) I can now easily fit baking fresh sourdough bread into my weekday work schedule. The recipe worked equally well for rye bread.

My favorite recipe section in the book is probably also the most unique - the one on Middle Eastern breads. It's brought to life by the authors' personal experiences from living and traveling in the Middle East. I love making fresh "Khbuz Arabi" (pita bread) when we have guests. They bake in just 5 minutes, the guests love watching them puff up, and they are delicious hot out of the oven. For a perfectly authentic version, and extra food for conversation, you could use the author's "La Giza" culture, collected from an ethnic bakery in Egypt.

At the end of the book is a small section that describes the sourdough cultures collected by the authors and available on their website (Sourdoughs International). It does not come across as a pitch but rather as sharing their passion for the history and variety of sourdough cultures.

I grew up in Germany on excellent rye and whole grain sourdough breads. Many years ago when I moved to the US and experienced serious bread withdrawal, I got Ed Wood's "New Zealand Culture for rye" and have been baking with it ever since. It makes fantastic rustic rye breads, though I tend to omit the extra ingredients (molasses, milk, and butter) listed in the book's rye recipes. Now Ed Wood has a new Polish rye sourdough culture and I am tempted to try it.
53 of 67 people found the following review helpful
Disappointing and Hardly Revolutionary! Aug. 9 2011
By Grandma - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a long-time (more than a half-century) bread baker and sourdough afficionado, I truly looked forward to Ed Wood's Classic Sourdoughs Revised: A Home Baker's Handbook. I was rather disappointed. Classic Sourdoughs reads like an academic treatise. Beginning home bakers will not find it an easy task to dig out the truly pertinent information that they need to know - much of which simply is not present.

I found the statement "As you embark on your work with sourdoughs" (page 25) extremely off-putting. I don't bake bread for WORK and don't encourage others to either. I bake for enjoyment, to save money, to relieve stress, to be able to serve something that I cannot easily acquire otherwise. "Exploration" would have been a far better choice of word.

As to the "handbook" aspect of Classic Sourdoughs, Ed gives very minimal directions for capturing a wild yeast, includes none of the work-arounds developed by other authorities such as King Arthur Flour, and then mostly gives any possible questions a home baker might have a complete brush off. I would expect a handbook to answer questions like:

"I'm moving. How can I best transport my sourdough?"

"I want to send some sourdough to my sister in California. How can I do that?"

"Can a wild yeast only be captured on a wheat starter?"

Ed Wood answers none of these things. He completely fails to mention the rye starters on which so many of the Central European breads depend and brushes off potato starter, the basis of the classic American Salt Rising Bread. His answer to problems capturing your first wild yeast is to simply dump the starter and try again.

In contradiction to a number of other authorities and sources, Wood is adamant that no baker's yeast should ever be added to either a sourdough starter or a sourdough bread. Otherwise, according to Wood, it cannot be considered a "true" sourdough. Unfortunately, he is not such a stickler for tradition when it comes to the recipes that he offers. Let me speak to two in particular, Wood's recipe for Challah on page 57 and his recipe for Bagels on page 116, both of which contain milk.

Both Challah and Bagels are traditional Jewish breads and as such, authentic recipes reflect Jewish dietary law, which prohibits the consumption of milk and meat at the same meal. (Many Orthodox will not eat milk on the same day that they eat meat.) Challah, in particular, is the bread of the Sabbath, the bread over which the household matriarch will say prayers on Friday evening. It is intended to be served at the Sabbath dinner, which in less well-to-do households might be the main meat meal of the week. As such, Challah should NEVER contain milk or butter. Similarly, Bagels, even Egg Bagels, do not ever contain milk. Wood's inclusion of milk in these two recipes, contrary to every Challah or Bagel recipe I have ever run across anywhere, leads me to question the reliability and authenticity of a number of other recipes he includes for more unusual products.

The addition of milk to these two recipes is not my only concern. I bake, thanks to Peter Reinhart's The Bread Baker's Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread and George Greenstein's Secrets of a Jewish Baker, some of the very best bagels to be had on the planet. (Either of these books includes directions and recipes for several sourdough starters, particularly Secrets of a Jewish Baker.) Even though I am an experienced bread baker, bagels took me several attempts using a variety of recipes from several sources. It is, in fact, only in the last several years that I have succeeded in making bagels. In the end, it all came down to the directions. Ed Wood's are simply entirely inadequate. If you want to learn to bake bagels, see The Bread Baker's Apprentice. Once you know how to bake bagels and want to expand your repertoire, turn to Secrets of a Jewish Baker. Similarly, Challah is a gorgeous braided loaf, but braiding is intricate. You'll need at the very least a good illustration or two and some patience. Wood's two-sentence braiding directions simply are not adequate to the job.

Finally, Wood has, for some reason I don't quite fathom, changed the traditional home-baking terminology of "proofing the yeast", "first rise" and "second rise" to "Culture Proof", "Dough Proof" and "Loaf Proof." As this terminology is unique to Wood, this seems to me to be unnecessarily complicating the subject rather than adding clarity to the basic ideas that underline all bread baking. What exactly it is he includes that represents a "revolutionary new method" I'm afraid escapes me.

Summary: This isn't an expensive book, so if you're just looking for more sourdough recipes you may find this interesting, though I would encourage you to use the Look Inside feature before you buy. If you are specifically looking for a book that will teach you to make sourdough breads, then look elsewhere.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Read this first! Please! Before you buy the book! July 11 2014
By Alice in AZ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Listen up, comrades in sourdough: go to king arthur flour.com. Yes, you-- Now order the sourdough kit, complete with a crock container. Yes, you need the crock, too. It is 27.95. You really need to buy this FIRST. If you don't, you have days and weeks ahead of you, gazing anxiously at a glop of flour, waiting for life to spring forth like some strange Mesopotamian creation myth.

Now your eyes are aglow with fantasies of Russian Brown Bread, Egyptian sourdough, the staff of life and all that. But one more thing--get a ton of flour and put it in your pantry. Dump at least 2 cups into a tupperware container, where you can toss a few big spoonfuls into the crock on your way to work. What works fast will keep you going in this tedious process. This is always true with sourdough. White flour is always best, no matter how ambitious you are. If you get to be an expert, you can try wheat....and rye....and ancient Mayan millet flour, whatever. Start with white.

Now you are ready to open the book. It's a good book, great for beginners and reference. Another one that is good is "Stokey's Sourdough", a little pamphlet that gives quick tips and recipes on making your sourdough. Please be patient--sourdough is like a little fickle animal that does whatever it wants to do. An evolution in microbes, and a test of the human will. You may want to keep a little notebook of successes and failures, or how you tweaked a recipe to make it work. This is now your science experiment.

When you succeed--you will feel so proud! This is your moment, you rebel, you! You have fed yourself and your family without a giant corporation deciding how you food will be prepared. And you have great appreciation for the real bakers of the world--this is certainly an art form.


Feedback