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Classic Star Wars: A Long Time Ago... Volume 1: Doomworld Comic – Jun 18 2002


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Product Details

  • Comic: 376 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse Books (June 18 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569717540
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569717547
  • Product Dimensions: 26.2 x 16.8 x 1.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 816 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,065,802 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Library Journal

In a seven-volume set, Dark Horse, which has had the license to publish Star Wars comic books since 1991, is reprinting the original Star Wars series, which was published by Marvel from 1977 (when the first movie was released) to 1986. This first volume, containing the series' first 20 issues, begins with a faithful six-issue adaptation of the first movie (though the four-volume manga adaptation, also from Dark Horse, is more faithful still) and then continues into original adventures. Some aspects are pretty silly-such as Don-Wan Kihotay, an old man with a lightsaber who believes himself to be a Jedi Knight, and villain Serji-X Arrogantus, obviously based on MAD magazine cartoonist Sergio Aragones. However, after writer Archie Goodwin takes over, there's much less of that. The entertaining stories end on a cliffhanger, so the next volume will be a necessary supplement. Dark Horse's Star Wars books are very popular, and this one is a real treat for teen and nostalgic adult fans.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lonnie E. Holder on Dec 25 2003
Format: Comic
Before the days of Dark Horse there was: THIS STUFF. On the one hand, this is what we once had. On the other hand, some of it was really corny. Sometimes the art was pretty awful. Other times it was the story line. Yet, through it all it was a lot like a grade B movie in comic book form; fun to read though you could never take it too seriously.
Some of the ideas were pure corn. How about a giant carnivorous rabbit (Jaxxon). The Don Wan Kioti character was right out of "The Man of La Mancha." There are other examples, but these suffice to give you a rough idea.
In spite of all the corn, these things are fun to read. The stories take me back to the days of yore when comics really were oriented towards young boys rather than adults, and we ate these things up. Of course, these were what we had, and we had no comparison to the quality graphics in todays comics. Many people in the industry are loath to call them comics.
While the book is a bit pricey, on the other hand you do get 20 comics. The book is pretty thick and the reproductions are good. You have to be a hard-core Star Wars fan or nostalgic for original Star Wars comics to want these, but for either of those groups, enjoy!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Hood on Sept. 8 2003
Format: Comic
Howard Chaykin is one of my favorite, if not the favorite comic book artists/writers. That is why it is so disappointing to see his work in this compilation. It is incredulous that the man who produced the gorgeous, crisp, clean art of American Flagg was responsible for the sloppy, hurried art presented in his issues. After Carmine Infantino takes over though, the art improves markedly.
The first six issues are an adaptation of the movie, although it bears much more resemblance to the novelization as it includes such things as Luke seeing his friends on Tatooine, Luke being a part of Blue group rather than Red. The first cover features a red-headed Princess Leia and a green Darth Vader in a mistake of galactic proportions. Also editing errors are rife throughout the adaptation with weapons being called different names throughout and not often matching what they were called in the movie. I can only hope they rushed these out 1 a week the quality was so low.
After we get through the movie adaptation things improve, though for a while we get some really bad editing. Names spelled differently in different panels for one thing. Still though, despite the improvement in plotting there are still some laughably bad ideas such as Don-Wan Kihotay(also spelled Don-Wan Kioti) the Man of La Mancha Jedi ripoff.
There is continual improvement though and we eventually get to see some nice, plausible adventures of what may have happened to our heroes after the destruction of the Death Star. Chewbacca though never really looks much like Chewbacca.
Two stars for the beginning, and the continual improvement brings it up to three stars.
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Format: Comic
This is a review of Star Wars - A Long time Ago... Doomworld, also referred to as volume I, which collects issues 1 through 20 of the Marvel comic series Star Wars. This is ISBN 1569717540 published June, 2002; made in China.

First the binding. Because Dark horse has had trouble with the TPB's bindings that are made in China, and because this is 369 pages, my copy has excellent binding. I actually read it without the comic falling apart in my hands!
With the exception of the binding problems, Dark horse has been producing comics that are visually awesome in terms of the inking and reproduction quality. You can still argue about the artwork and pencil work itself, because they use so many people and try different styles. There are those artists whose style I just don't care for. I say that to remind one that these are reproductions of comics that marvel created A LONG TIME AGO... Dark Horse has actually enhanced the original quality.
The quality of the pencil work varies here by story, but generally it was not bad. You'll have little trouble identifying who is who. Generally the artwork is a D to a C when compared to what DH produces today. However the inking is excellent. I recall no story where the color appeared to be washed out.
As for the stories themselves, I read these with my son, and he likes the ones with lots of action and vibrant drawings. You get both here, because with 20 different stories you do get variety.
This is a 2.5 star rounded up to 3 for the effort that DH put into improving the quality of this comics visual elements.
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Format: Comic
Archie Goodwin's plots were great, but the art that accompanies these stories are sometimes painful to look at. The square-jawed, super-muscled look doesn't really match our on-screen versions of Han Solo and Luke Skywalker. The idealized voluptiousness of Leia isn't exactly a dead ringer for Carrie Fisher, either. And if you're looking for Jabba the Hutt, this isn't the place to see him unless you remember him as a yellow, seal-faced humanoid.
Despite the cosmetic differences though, the characters are decently expanded and given interesting things to do. Luke's adventures on a water planet 20 years before Attack of the Clones make us wonder why we didn't see Jango and Obi-Wan riding the serpents in their modern version. The blind, vengeful Baron Tagge provides an interesting side to the Jedi mythology as he seeks to destroy Darth Vader, the man who robbed him of his sight. And assorted background characters like The Starkiller Kid and Valance the Hunter bring some fresh perspective to the events of the galaxy. These were the first looks at Luke and friends from outside the eyes of Rebellion or Empire, decades before the "Tales from the..." anthologies were published.
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