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Classical Electrodynamics Hardcover – Aug 10 1998


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 832 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 3 edition (Aug. 10 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047130932X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471309321
  • Product Dimensions: 26 x 18.8 x 3.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #34,722 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
We begin our discussion of electrodynamics with the subject of electrostatics-phenomena involving time-independent distributions of charge and fields. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 29 2003
Format: Hardcover
I believe the main reason that this book remains the standard graduate-level E&M text is "inertia". Your prof used it, and so you will, too. As a physics text, it supplies more mathematical details than physical insight. Confusing mathematical expressions with physical understanding may be the reason that many people get the warm and fuzzy feeling about this book. The truth is, most people who proclaim to enjoy this book probably haven't throughly mastered the -physical- contents of Griffith's undergraduate text. If you truely have, you can go a long way without touching Jackson. Sure, long math equations can be orgasmic, but it's not physics.
The explanations in this book for the most part can best be described as turbid. For a particulary hideous example, try the section on the vectorial diffraction theory, and come back and ask yourself if you really know what the heck he's talking about. And then ask if HE knew what he was talking about.
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By Jacob Jacobson on Feb. 12 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is one hard nut to crack. Make sure you already are proficient with EM and relativity before you start this book.
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By A Customer on Feb. 17 2004
Format: Hardcover
First off, this is either a graduate book or a senior undergraduate book in Physics. The book assumes at least 2 years of college math, preferably for engineering or physics folks.
What sets this book apart is the focus on physics is perfect as we understand E&M theory at this point. Unlike other imperfect college texts like Lorraine and Courson, this book contains no errors. While some may no like "and the proof is left to the reader", the book is meant to teach people who are focused on physics but can describe the process mathematically as well as in regular language.
The assumption is that there has already been a rigorous introduction of both physics and mathematics so this book is NOT a casual read.
The beauty of this book is that it's not just teaching knowledge but it teaches one how to think. To those who can rise to the occasion and draw upon their education, professors and peers, there is the satisfaction of really understanding E&M clearly and concisely.
To those who only seek rote knowledge, this book will be too challenging.
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By A Customer on Jan. 28 2004
Format: Hardcover
I like Jackson, but I think that most people don't.
Anyway, the reason I'm writing this is to tell the
Reviewer from July 12, 2000 that Jackson DID write
another book. It's called
"The Physics of Elementary Particles."
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Format: Hardcover
This book seems to just show how well Jackson knows E&M, but does not lead us readers well to know the subject. This book uses more math than physics to introduce the concepts and sometimes the math used has not been presented clearly and vigorously enough for the readers to follow. Our class used this book as a text book and many of us winded up buying many other books just to find out what the heck Jackson's book is talking about. If you already know E&M theory very well, you might appreciate the breadth and depth of this book. But if you do not know the subject very well to begin with, look somewhere else for the book(s) you plan to follow.
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Format: Hardcover
Having been through the torture imposed by all graduate programs in physics, I think we all agree that although Jackson's text is an excellent reference and a superb supplementary text, this is NOT what most people would call an appropriate starting point. Granted, some (and note bene SOME) problems are useful, a more graduated approach could be used without losing any of the flow of the text. Indeed, once I finished my two semesters (and took a LONG break), I found out many things in this text were a nice surprise upon review (it also helps if your original professor speaks English). Buy it. Keep it on the shelf as a badge of honor. You should, however, end up reading it and working through at least some of the problems.
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Format: Hardcover
I used Jackson for my graduate level advanced electrodynamics class. I was befuddled the first semester but made a good grade. Between the first and second semesters I had to study for and take the qualifiers. I used Jeans and Smythe's Static and Dynamic Electricity and found these to be excellent though difficult texts. As a corollary I also re-studied the required mathematics. Now I understood where Jackson was coming from! I was able to not only solve all the problems in the electostatics and Maxwell equations sections of Jackson but also my studies from Smythe and Jeans covered much of the second semester of Jackson also. When I took the second semester I was able to breeze through solving the problems and taking the tests to such an extent that my professors, who had trouble with the problems, wondered what had happened. It did not hurt that a close friend and I had recently built a radio telescope array in the hills of Tennessee during vacation thereby obtaining a nearly irreproducible knowledge of antenna theory. In my opinion, Jackson is mostly a guideline for studying electrodynamics. Once the student has the background Jackson is both fun and enlightening. Therein lies the difficulty. I have noticed that many libraries have "put up" or gotten rid of their Jeans and Smythes and other classical texts. The new books are not really a substitute. Since many professors did not really learn electrodynamics that well themselves, this make it truly difficult to obtain a really great grounding in the subject. I did not truly understand the difference until I was doing a lot of computational electrodynamics years later. Regardless of how one goes about it, somehow the student must get the required background before really using Jackson in any meaningful fashion. Current education in physics has made this more not less difficult.
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