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Classics in Game Theory Hardcover – Feb 3 1997


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (Feb. 3 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691011931
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691011936
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.6 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 721 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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First Sentence
ONE MAY define a concept of an n-person game in which each player has a finite set of pure strategies and in which a definite set of payments to the n players corresponds to each n-tuple of pure strategies, one strategy being taken for each player. Read the first page
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By A Customer on Dec 6 2002
Format: Paperback
I love this book -- but this is what I do. I doubt someone looking to learn game theory on their own is going to find this of any interest. Any serious student of game theory should find it very useful.
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By Scott C. Woodruff on April 1 2000
Format: Paperback
This book takes you through the land that Von Neumann, in my opinion, created. There is no way any game theorist or game theory novice can appreciate the lenghts to which the field has expanded, without first understanding its roots. It contains the actual report, where Nash defined what is now the basis for all game theory, the Nash equilibrium! That is true excitement
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Amazon.com: 3 reviews
27 of 35 people found the following review helpful
A classic March 31 2000
By Scott C. Woodruff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book takes you through the land that Von Neumann, in my opinion, created. There is no way any game theorist or game theory novice can appreciate the lenghts to which the field has expanded, without first understanding its roots. It contains the actual report, where Nash defined what is now the basis for all game theory, the Nash equilibrium! That is true excitement
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
more for specialists Dec 5 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I love this book -- but this is what I do. I doubt someone looking to learn game theory on their own is going to find this of any interest. Any serious student of game theory should find it very useful.
A bargain Dec 27 2013
By Jyotirmoy Bhattacharya - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This compilation reprints classic papers from the foundational period of game theory, the 1950s and 60s. This book is not for the beginner or even the advanced student. Contemporary textbooks such as Binmore's 'Playing for Real' (for undergraduates) or Fundenberg and Tirole's 'Game Theory' (for graduate students) do a much better job of presenting game theory as it is currently understood and practised. The benefits of hindsight are clear if one compares the discussion of extensive form games in these textbooks to Kuhn's classic paper or the discussion of Bayesian games to Harsanyi's paper. Also, because the latest paper in this collection is from 1975 you will find little mention of current topics like algorithmic game theory, repeated games, evolutionary game theory or mechanism design.

But after having studied the textbooks sometimes you would still want to read the original papers to get a better sense of the context and motivation for an idea. Sometimes it is only in these papers that you get a glimpse of conceptual problems that have been glossed over in later works. At those times this book will save you many trips to the photocopier. The papers have been retypeset very neatly and so far I have not been able to find any typos.

If you are buying this you may also want to get the two volumes of Aumann's collected works, which in many ways continue the story that this book begins.

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