CDN$ 39.95
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Claudius the God: And His Wife, Messalina Audio CD – Jan 1 2010


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 1.03
Audio CD
"Please retry"
CDN$ 39.95
CDN$ 39.95 CDN$ 71.46

Up to 90% Off Textbooks

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio; Retail CD edition (Jan. 1 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441715134
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441715135
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 13.3 x 15.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,559,424 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Picking up where the extraordinarily interesting I, Claudius ends, Claudius the God tells the tale of Claudius' 13-year reign as Emperor of Rome. Naturally, it ends when Claudius is murdered--believe me, it's not giving anything away to say this; the surprise is when someone doesn't get poisoned. While Claudius spends most of his time before becoming emperor tending to his books and his writings and trying to stay out of the general line of corruption and killings, his life on the throne puts him into the center of the political maelstrom. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark Edward Bachmann on Oct. 27 2000
Format: Hardcover
This novel, like its antecedent I, Claudius, will mesmerize those who love classical history, although casual readers may find it tedious. The two works together form a fictional autobiography of the Roman emperor Claudius, who - at least in this literary incarnation - is both an astute observer of first century Roman political society and an extraordinary character in his own right. Born into the Roman imperial family but repelled by the violence and treachery surrounding it, Claudius retreats from power for much of his adult life. He buries himself in obscure academic pursuits and hides, for what he believes to be his own safety, behind array of weird physical disabilities. When his nephew, the mad emperor Caligula, meets his just reward, the middle-aged Claudius is literally dragged against his will onto the Imperial throne. I, Claudius ends with this bizarre scene and Claudius the God takes up from there with the improbable emperor's own account of his reign up to point of his death. Much to everyone's surprise, Claudius emerges into the public eye as an energetic, able and just ruler. And while the great pride he takes in his enterprise is evident, both the style of his rule and the tone of his narrative is characterized by a wry and self-deprecating humor. Much of the book consists of a detailed recounting of the administrative, judicial and military minutia in which Claudius immersed himself. However, there is a deeper theme at work too, which is the inevitability that innocence in a corrupt world will be betrayed. Claudius's closest friend for much of his life is Herod Agrippa, the grandson of the biblical Herod the Great.Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 29 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Claudius: The Reluctant Emperor Sept. 22 2009
By Maxine A. Hartley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It has been over 70 years since Robert Graves wrote: 'I, Claudius' and 'Claudius The God' but they are still relevant and fascinating reading, especially to those who are interested in ancient Roman history and are curious as to where our society began and who structured it. The answers are: in Rome by Romans.

While the Republic was dead by the time of Claudius (who followed Caesar Caligula, who followed Augustus, who followed Julius Caesar) Claudius always hoped to be Emperor only as long as it took him to re-establish the Republic. Since crises followed crises in quick succession, Claudius was unable to get his wish, which was to return to writing his histories and he died disappointed that this one wish had not been fulfilled.

He was reluctant to begin with. Born lame and stuttering with a head which jerked from side to side (modern doctors think that he had, perhaps, cerebral palsey) he was considered an idiot because of the infirmity of his body. But Claudius had an intelligence far above that of normal and early on in his life, learned Greek (and later, other languages) and began writing histories of Rome and surrounding territories. Because his whole family kept disappearing in quick succession (particularly under the mad Caligula) and were primarily poisoned, he acted the fool and hid away as much as possible, concentrating on his extensive research and his writing. Then the guards murdered Caligula and raising Claudius on their shoulders, proclaimed him Emperor. And so the reluctant reign of this benign,compassionate caesar began.

In 43 A.D. Claudius conquered the Southern Britains and managed to get the queen of southern Wales and the king of Kent on his side as friends and allies of Rome. He couldn't be an active general because of his disabilities but his brilliant mind devised strategic trickery to subdue the Britains. Into the battle fray, he drove elephants and camels, animals from the territories of Rome but strange to the superstitious Britains. This frightened several of the troops enough that they ran away.

Claudius was also reponsible for solving the problems of the Jews in Alexandria (his childhood friend was Herod Agrippa who was raised in Rome) and in 'Syria', roughly, the territory of current day Israel and Palestine. He also made Ostia a secure port, work which took 20 years to complete, so that the grain supply for Rome from Sicily and Africa would reach Rome safely to feed the city during the winter. Claudius also constructed several aqueducts to ensure that the city had clean drinking water, particularly the 'lower' orders, i.e. the plebeians. Previously,disease was rampant in Rome in the winter since the only drinking water for the city residents was the befouled Tiber, into which all sewage ran.

For his historical research, Robert Graves says that he borrowed from historians: Tacitus, Dio Cassius, Seutonius, Pliny, Varro, Valerius Maximus, Orosius, Frontinus, Strabo, Caesar (Julius), Columella, Plutarch, Josephus, Diodorus, Siculus, Photius, Xiphilinus, Zonaras, Seneca, Petronius, Juvenal, Philo, Calsus, the Acts of the Apostles the pseudo-gospels of Nicodemus and St. James and last but not least, Claudius, in his surviving letters and speeches.(Unfortunately, most of Claudius's writings did not survive.) Graves says: 'Few incidents here given are wholly unsupported by historical authority of some sort or other....No character is invented.'

Claudius adopted his stepson, Lucius, who ruled as the infamous Nero.

We are reading of the slow disintegration of Rome through decadence and greed. It probably would have occurred faster than it did, if compassionate and reasonable leaders such as Julius Caesar and Claudius did not appear from time to time. Unfortunately, these leaders were in the minority and mad leaders such as Caligula and Nero became the norm.

Is there a lesson for modern society? I believe there is and it is this: Be as rich as you can be, but do as much as you can for all members of society, particularly the ones which fortune, for one reason of another, has deprived. Only when NO members of society are disenfranchised can a society survive and thrive.

Warning on Text: Unless you have super-sonic eyes, find out what sort of print the text has. The Penguin edition is good, large enough on which to focus. Some of the editions have such small print that one would need a magnifying glass. Penguin is borderline in print size, but one can manage without red-rimmed eyes in the morning.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A cynical and sad tale, beautifully written Oct. 27 2000
By Mark Edward Bachmann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This novel, like its antecedent I, Claudius, will mesmerize those who love classical history, although casual readers may find it tedious. The two works together form a fictional autobiography of the Roman emperor Claudius, who - at least in this literary incarnation - is both an astute observer of first century Roman political society and an extraordinary character in his own right. Born into the Roman imperial family but repelled by the violence and treachery surrounding it, Claudius retreats from power for much of his adult life. He buries himself in obscure academic pursuits and hides, for what he believes to be his own safety, behind array of weird physical disabilities. When his nephew, the mad emperor Caligula, meets his just reward, the middle-aged Claudius is literally dragged against his will onto the Imperial throne. I, Claudius ends with this bizarre scene and Claudius the God takes up from there with the improbable emperor's own account of his reign up to point of his death. Much to everyone's surprise, Claudius emerges into the public eye as an energetic, able and just ruler. And while the great pride he takes in his enterprise is evident, both the style of his rule and the tone of his narrative is characterized by a wry and self-deprecating humor. Much of the book consists of a detailed recounting of the administrative, judicial and military minutia in which Claudius immersed himself. However, there is a deeper theme at work too, which is the inevitability that innocence in a corrupt world will be betrayed. Claudius's closest friend for much of his life is Herod Agrippa, the grandson of the biblical Herod the Great. Herod Agrippa is a charming rogue and schemer who, while genuinely fond of Claudius, teases him mercilessly for being a fool and warns him, as it turns out in all seriousness, to "trust no one". The irony in the admonition is apparent when Herod himself betrays Claudius, plotting militarily against him and almost succeeding. This is only a side story, however. The thematic climax of the book occurs when it comes to light that Claudius's beautiful wife Messalina, whom he adores with the intense innocence of a teenager in love, has been using him all along for the fool, taking lovers and mocking Claudius behind his back. He finally discovers the truth when she is found to be conspiring with one of these paramours to seize the throne. She is executed for her treachery, but Claudius's spirit dies with her. He re-marries, but to a woman he cares nothing about and who, with his knowledge and acquiescence - for his death has been foretold by augury - begins amassing power on her own and conspiring to make way for her own son by a previous marriage. This son is later to enter history as the decadent fiddler Nero. The book closes with actual historical accounts by Tacitus and Dio Cassius of the real-life emperor's death at the hands of his ambitious wife, who poisons him. The last pages give us the final degradation, a bitterly satirical account Seneca, depicting Claudius - in death, once again the fool - trying to enter Olympus as the deified emperor but being banished mockingly to Hades by the other gods. The book is cynical and deeply sad. It's beautifully written and I recommend it, although it won't be to everyone's taste.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Arguably the greatest fictional biography ever written. Dec 5 2006
By Mary Whipple - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In I, Claudius, Robert Graves creates the first person narrative of Claudius Drusus Nero Germanicus, known in Roman history as Claudius, and widely regarded as an idiot. Telling the story of his family's rule from the beginning of the Christian era until his death fifty years later, Claudius relates stories of his grandmother Livia, one of the most treacherous women in history, a woman who manipulated the imperial succession through poisonings, assassinations, marriages, and secret alliances. The reign of her son Tiberius is bloody, murderous, and corrupt. Tiberius's succession by Caligula, his insane grandson and the protégé of Livia, takes Rome into even more terrifying debauchery. Claudius's ultimate succession to the throne is widely regarded as a joke.

In Claudius, the God, Graves continues the story of Claudius, who is hugely popular when he first becomes Emperor, refusing many of the numerous titles claimed by his predecessors because he believes he has not yet earned them. Gradually, we observe the truism that "power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely." His invasion of Britain, his relationship with his wife Messalina, and his attempts to control the succession to the throne show his attempts to manipulate Roman history and his own legacy. The reader develops enormous sympathy for this man who began his reign with pure motives but who was ultimately powerless to control his own destiny and that of Rome.

Characters are complex, fully developed humans, instead of cardboard, costumed ancients, and their machinations, though extremely bloody, show the conflicts that occur when absolute rule and republican sentiments contend for dominance, a conflict in which Graves says he saw parallels to World War I and its aftermath.

Taken together, these two novels of Claudius constitute what is arguably the greatest fictional biography ever written. Precise historical detail creates a rich tapestry of life in the period, while, at the same time, Graves's keen awareness of psychology leads to vibrant and believable characters behaving badly. The values (and lack of them) in the period are presented in dramatic scenes of violence and excess, and the fickleness of the masses (whom Claudius calls "the frog pool") is both realistic and sadly universal. A masterful characterization of a lesser known Caesar. n Mary Whipple
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Long time favorite FINALLY in e-book July 7 2012
By GeekyGal - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Robert Graves' I, ClaudiusI, Claudius (Penguin Classics), and Claudius the GodClaudius the God (Penguin Classics) are really one longer completely brilliant work rather than stand alone novels. Do read them in order. I've loved them since the first time I read them, loved the Masterpeice Theater production with Sir Derek Jacobi as ClaudiusI, Claudius. Although the title of that was I, Claudius as well, it covered both books.

These works inspired me, and others, to study Roman History in fact through their fiction. Some of the more interesting and scandalous bits are questioned by historians. That's fine as this does not pretend to be anything by fiction.

The fun, though, is how much is fact based and how entertaining those facts are. For a very largely factual story, this is a thrill ride of a novel. Heros, murderers, lunatics, royalty, poor relations, valor, politics, theater, battles, scandals, elephants, gods, and all in one family who are pretty much ruling what they think of as the known world in whatever spare time they have left.

Claudius the God is the last phase of Claudius' life, where he goes from outliving most of his family, and how it affects him (and many other people). People have objected to some of the work as "padding", the long look at Herod Agrippa's story, for example. I enjoyed it all. Graves is a brilliant writer. One can appreciate that these books came from a Poet Laureate.

Penguin chose a terrible cover for this, in my view. Don't be put off by it. One of the many advantages of ebooks is that you don't have to look at a terrible cover.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The story continues... May 10 2012
By Alison - Published on Amazon.com
A consistent continuation of the story. Great detail and excellent characterization. A fitting second volume. Seamless continuation of the story.


Feedback