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Closer (Superbit(TM)) [Import]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Natalie Portman, Jude Law, Clive Owen, Julia Roberts, Nick Hobbs
  • Directors: Mike Nichols
  • Writers: Patrick Marber
  • Producers: Cary Brokaw, Celia D. Costas, Duncan Reid, James Clayton, John Calley
  • Format: AC-3, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : General Audience (G)
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: March 29 2005
  • Run Time: 104 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0007OCG4W

Product Description

Product Description

Closer (Superbit Edition)

Amazon.ca

Four extremely beautiful people do extremely horrible things to one another in Closer, Mike Nichols' pungent adaptation of Patrick Marber's play that easily marks the Oscar-winning director's best work in years. Anna (Julia Roberts) is a photographer who specializes in portraits of strangers; Dan (Jude Law) is an obituary writer struggling to become a novelist; Alice (Natalie Portman) is an American stripper freshly arrived in London after a bad relationship; and Larry (Clive Owen) is a dermatologist who finds love under the most unlikely of circumstances. When their paths cross it's a dizzying supernova of emotions, as Nichols and Marber adroitly construct various scenes out of their lives that pair them again and again in various permutations of passion, heartbreak, anger, sadness, vengeance, pleading, deception, and most importantly, brutal honesty. It's only until you're more than halfway through the movie that you'll have to ask yourself exactly why you are watching such a beautifully tragic tale, as Closer is basically the ickiest, grossest, most dysfunctional parts of all your past relationships strung together into one movie. Ultimately, it falls to the four actors to draw you deeper into the story; all succeed relatively, but it's Law and Owen whose characters will cut you to the quick. Law proves that yet again he's most adept at playing charming, amoral bastards with manipulative streaks, and Owen is nothing short of brilliant as the character most turned on by the energy inherent in destructive relationships--whether he's on the giving or receiving end. --Mark Englehart

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By T. Halkin on Aug. 19 2005
Format: DVD
Playwright Patrick Marber, who adapted his stage play for the large screen, has obviously been very influenced by playwrights the likes of Harold Pinter (think the relationships in "Betrayal") and David Mamet (think the staccato scene structure of "A Life in the Theatre"). Granted, if you're going to be influenced by other writers, then why not two of the best playwrights of our time. Perhaps it is this reason why "Closer" has a somewhat less-than-original feeling about it. Then pepper it with a touch of Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing" and you start experiencing déjà-vu.
That having been said, is there really anything truly new under the sun? OK, occasionally - that's what makes a great writer great - but that is extremely rare. So Marber is not setting new benchmarks, but by coupling up with the brilliant Mike Nichols, Marber was able to bring something rather new to the large screen...something that is usually reserved for the relative few who venture out to the theatres of this world - and I don't mean the ones playing the latest Andrew Lloyd Weber musical.
So far, I have met no one who "sort of" likes this film. Everyone I have spoken to about it either loves it, or hates it. This is quite evident in the reviews that one reads here on Amazon. I, however, am truly in the middle.
Getting past my Pinter-Mamet-Stoppard déjà-vu, I was faced with a piece that is much more at home on a theatre stage than it is on a movie screen. The two media normally have very different structures, feelings and pacing. Rarely does it work to adapt a theatre piece for the large screen. The success here was only marginal. The biggest problem with "Closer" is it's pacing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. B. Alcat TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Jan. 10 2007
Format: DVD
"Closer" begins quite traditionally: two strangers fall in love. Dan (Jude Law), an aspiring novelist, cannot help but feeling immensely attracted to Alice (Natalie Portman), a young American waitress and stripper who is in London escaping from a failed relationship. But nothing last forever, and after some time he meets Anna (Julia Roberts), a photographer, and feels attracted to her. The film's subtitle says it all: "If you believe in love at first sight, you never stop looking".

Nothing happens right away, but from then onwards, things go downhill for Alice and Dan. Yes, they don't break up, but Dan is already mentally involved in another relationship, even if he is too coward to leave Alice, and although he knows that Anna won't go out with him. Dan is so obsessed with Anna that he even impersonates her in a sex-chat, unintentionally paving the way for the meeting of Anna with her future husband, Larry (Clive Owen).

Eventually Dan, Alice, Anna and Larry take part in a twisted dance of deceit, guilt and anger. Betrayal, lack of trust, and relationships gone sour are the themes of "Closer". This isn't a movie about love, but rather one about attraction, lust and lies.

What is the truth?. What is love?. Can we just decide not to be in love?. As you see this movie, you will ask yourself those questions and quite a few more. The characters are not specially lovable, but they are somehow fascinating, in the way snakes sometimes are. All the same, their acting is really superb. Natalie Portman, in particular, was outstanding as Alice. Innocent yet seductive, vulnerable and worldweary, Portman delivers some of the more striking lines in the film, for instance when Alice says to Larry that "lying is the most fun a girl can have while keeping her clothes on".
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By Steven Aldersley TOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 10 2011
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Directed by Mike Nicholls
Starring Clive Owen, Natalie Portman, Jude Law and Julia Roberts
104 minutes

Video:
Video codec: MPEG-4 AVC
Video resolution: 1080p
Aspect ratio: 1.85:1

Audio:
English: LPCM 5.1 (48kHz, 16-bit)
English: Dolby Digital 5.1
French: Dolby Digital 5.1
Italian: LPCM 5.1 (48kHz, 16-bit)
Italian: Dolby Digital 5.1

Subtitles: English, English SDH, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Cantonese, Korean, Thai

I used to confuse this film with Control (a Joy Division biopic), because Closer is also the name of Joy Division's last studio album.

Mike Nichols (The Graduate) was in his 70s when he directed Closer and times have changed a lot since the days of The Graduate (1967). Both are excellent films though, despite the change.

What elevates Closer from the pack is the writing. Patrick Marber wrote the play and also adapted the screenplay. If you have ever seen a TV series starring Steve Coogan, Marber probably wrote it. He has a talent for writing comedy and it's the type of comedy I like. That said, Closer is not a comedy; it's a drama with plenty of humour in it.

Good actors can't really succeed without good writing, but this has both. All four do good work here. It has the feel of a Woody Allen film in some ways and also reminds me of Glengarry Glen Ross as both were adapted from plays. The dialogue comes at you at a fast pace and the actors play off one another well. Some conversations are a joy to experience.

Both men sleep with both women (not at the same time) and the story deals with the relationships in an amusing way. The main point of the film is to show how much people lie to one another.
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