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Cluetrain Manifesto Hardcover – Feb 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 190 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Collins Canada; First Edition edition (Feb. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738202444
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738202440
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.6 x 2.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (137 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #298,714 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
Hard to recommend such a small publication when the entire thing is now available for download at the website.
Markets are conversations. This is good.
Mass marketing is not a conversation. That is bad.
The authors leave themselves open to some fair criticism - their ideas aren't fully developed nor are their any clear suggestions as to implementation. It reads more as a protestation against existing norms than a viable alternative.
Find a second-hand copy. It's worth a read but not quite worth the price.
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Format: Paperback
I think the target audience is somebody who completely missed out on the late nineties, but who would like a very light read to understand the change in openness and freedom in conversations that most folks now take for granted. There's not a lot of content here -- you can skim about 10% of the book and get seemingly 99% of the content. If you're really "clueless", hit the web version instead and save the effort of grabbing this book.
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Format: Paperback
I have mixed feelings about this book. At the beginning, it makes a lot of sense, with discussions about markets and the power of the Internet. Here it succeeds. The problem is that it runs out of steam. A lot of concepts are repeated over and over and some of them make less sense the more they are repeated. There are some good ideas about using the technology to reconnect with customers, co-workers and the world at large. The case histories are also quite illuminating. These guys have clearly been there and done it. The problem I have is that they think the Internet is somehow a magic cure for a lot of these problems. Technology by itself never fixes anything and I say this as someone who is an IT professional.
I found it an interesting read, but was left wanting more from it in the end. Some of the observations about organisational hierarchy and culture I think are over simplified and at times plain wrong. As a companion to the book, I would recommend readers try "Good to Great" by Jim Collins, which deals with how some organisations make the jump and some don't. It's an interesting counterpoint, as it focusses a lot on effective management of people, any organisation's most valuable asset. Cluetrain is worth a read, but keep some salt handy....
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Format: Paperback
Markets are converstions. When markets were created, the term market was a place where we came together to exchange goods and services, along with the stories of the grand ventures. Market was a place, not a verb. In the market people exchanged stories with their goods.
The industrial complex built up. Things became automated. Supply and demand seperated.
The web was created. The barriers between supply and demand erode. All along markets are conversations. Few businesses understand this, do you?
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Format: Hardcover
The Cluetrain Manifesto was one of the seminal books of the dot.com bubble era, but reading it now is like waking with a hangover and looking at all of the empty bottles, each of which seemed like a great idea at the time. The Internet changed everything, all right. Those who can bite back the irony long enough to see the big picture and keep reading will find some valuable practical advice on using the now-not-so-new-technology of the Web to do business more effectively. We recommend this pivotal book for the sake of your sense of perspective (or to give you a critically necessary background if you are too young to remember when Amazon was just a river.)
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Format: Paperback
If you prefer Hotwired to The Economist, James Carville to David Brinkley, and Tom Peters to Peter Drucker, you will probably enjoy this book. It cheers the power of the Internet to create productive informal relationships between people.
The book's primary message is "Markets are conversations." It should have been "Marketing is a conversation."
Economic transactions are the exchange of information as well as economic goods and money. The authors are right to condemn the traditional tendency to focus too much on the exchange of economic goods for money. By overstating their case, the authors imply that we can safely ignore the exchange of economic goods and money. As many dot.com investors learned the hard way, dominating a particular conversational niche on the Internet does not automatically lead to success in business.
As a book about marketing over the Internet, this book deserves four stars. As a book about Internet economics or information age management, it deserves none.
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Format: Paperback
If you prefer Hotwired to The Economist, James Carville to David Brinkley, and Tom Peters to Peter Drucker, you will probably enjoy this book. It cheers the power of the Internet to create productive informal relationships between people.
The book's primary message is "Markets are conversations." It should have been "Marketing is a conversation."
Economic transactions are the exchange of information as well as economic goods and money. The authors are right to condemn the traditional tendency to focus too much on the exchange of economic goods for money. By overstating their case, the authors imply that we can safely ignore the exchange of economic goods and money. As many dot.com investors learned the hard way, dominating a particular conversational niche on the Internet does not automatically lead to success in business.
As a book about marketing over the Internet, this book deserves four stars. As a book about Internet economics or information age management, it deserves none.
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