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The Collected John Carter of Mars (A Princess of Mars, Gods of Mars, and Warlord of Mars) Paperback – Feb 7 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Disney Editions (Feb. 7 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423154266
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423154266
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 721 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #234,832 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author


Edgar Rice Burroughs, 1875-1950

Edgar Rice Burroughs is renowed for his many novels of fantastic adventure. Unquestionably his best-known creation is that of the jungle hero, Tarzan the Ape Man, but almost as well known are his stories of other planets beginning with the very popular Mars series. A torrent of novels followed: stories about Venus, tales of the Moon and of the middle Earth, westerns, and detective stories. In all, nearly one hundred stories bore Edgar Rice Burroughs' name.

Born in Chicago in 1875, he tried his hand at many businesses without notable success, until at the age of thirty-five, he turned to writing. With the publication of Tarzan of the Apes and A Princess of Mars, his career was assured. By the time of his death in 1950, at his home in a town bearing the name of his best known work, Tarzana, California over 40 million copies of Edgar Rice Burroughs books have appeared in 58 different languages.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

FOREWORD
TO THE READER OF THIS WORK:


In submitting Captain Carter’s strange manuscript to you in book form, I believe that a few words relative to this remarkable personality will be of interest.

My first recollection of Captain Carter is of the few months he spent at my father’s home in Virginia, just prior to the opening of the Civil War. I was then a child of but five years, yet I will remember the tall, dark, smooth-faced, athletic man whom I called Uncle Jack.

He seemed always to be laughing; and he entered into the sports of the children with the same hearty good fellowship he displayed toward those pastimes in which the men and women of his own age indulged; or he would sit for an hour at a time entertaining my old grandmother with stories of his strange, wild life in all parts of the world. We all loved him, and our slaves fairly worshipped the ground he trod.

He was a splendid specimen of manhood, standing a good two inches over six feet, broad of shoulder and narrow of hip, with the carriage of the trained fighting man. His features were regular and clear cut, his hair black and closely cropped, while his eyes were of a steel gray, reflecting a strong and loyal character, filled with fire and initiative. His manners were perfect, and his courtliness was that of a typical southern gentleman of the highest type.

His horsemanship, especially after hounds, was a marvel and delight even in that country of magnificent horsemen. I have often heard my father caution him against his wild recklessness but he would only laugh, and say that the tumble that killed him would be from the back of a horse yet unfoaled.

When the war broke out he left us, nor did I see him again for some fifteen or sixteen years. When he returned it was without warning, and I was much surprised to note that he had not aged apparently a moment, nor had he changed in any other outward way. He was, when others were with him, the same genial, happy fellow we had known of old, but when he thought himself alone I have seen him sit for hours gazing off into space, his face set in a look of wistful longing and hopeless misery; and at night he would sit thus looking up into the heavens, at what I did not know until I read his manuscript years afterwards.

He told us that he had been prospecting and mining in Arizona part of the time since the war; and that he had been very successful was evidenced by the unlimited amount of money with which he was supplied. As to the details of his life during these years he was very reticent, in fact he would not talk of them at all.

He remained with us for about a year and then went to New York, where he purchased a little place on the Hudson, where I visited him once a year on the occasions of my trips to the New York market—my father and I owning and operating a string of general stores throughout Virginia at that time. Captain Carter had a small but beautiful cottage, situated on a bluff overlooking the river, and during one of my last visits, in the winter of 1885, I observed he was much occupied in writing, I presume now, upon this manuscript.

He told me at this time that if anything should happen to him he wished me to take charge of his estate, and he gave me a key to a compartment in the safe which stood in his study, telling me I would find his will there and some personal instructions which he had me pledge myself to carry out with absolute fidelity.

After I had retired for the night I have seen him from my window standing in the moonlight on the brink of the bluff overlooking the Hudson with his arms stretched out to the heavens as though in appeal. I thought at the time that he was praying, although I never had understood that he was in the strict sense of the term a religious man.

Several months after I had returned home from my last visit, the first of March, 1886, I think, I received a telegram from him asking me to come to him at once. I had always been his favorite among the younger generation of Carters and so I hastened to comply with his demand.

I arrived at the little station, about a mile from his grounds, on the morning of March 4, 1886, and when I asked the livery man to drive me out to Captain Carter’s he replied that if I was a friend of the Captain’s he had some very bad news for me; the Captain had been found dead shortly after daylight that very morning by the watchman attached to an adjoining property.

For some reason this news did not surprise me, but I hurried out to his place as quickly as possible, so that I could take charge of the body and of his affairs.

I found the watchman who had discovered him, together with the local police chief and several townspeople, assembled in his little study. The watchman related the few details connected with the finding of the body, which he said had been still warm when he came upon it. It lay, he said, stretched full length in the snow with the arms outstretched above the head toward the edge of the bluff, and when he showed me the spot it flashed upon me that it was the identical one where I had seen him on those other nights, with his arms raised in supplication to the skies.

There were no marks of violence on the body, and with the aid of a local physician the coroner’s jury quickly reached a decision of death from heart failure. Left alone in the study, I opened the safe and withdrew the contents of the drawer in which he had told me I would find my instructions. They were in part peculiar indeed, but I have followed them to each last detail as faithfully as I was able.

He directed that I remove his body to Virginia without embalming, and that he be laid in an open coffin within a tomb which he previously had had constructed and which, as I later learned, was well ventilated. The instructions impressed upon me that I must personally see that this was carried out just as he directed, even in secrecy if necessary.

His property was left in such a way that I was to receive the entire income for twenty-five years, when the principal was to become mine. His further instructions related to this manuscript which I was to retain sealed and unread, just as I found it, for eleven years; nor was I to divulge its contents until twenty-one years after his death.

A strange feature about the tomb, where his body still lies, is that the massive door is equipped with a single, huge gold-plated spring lock which can be opened only from the inside.

Yours very sincerely,

Edgar Rice Burroughs

© 2012 Simon & Schuster --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M Chandler on Jan. 31 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Like the full set of Baum's Oz books, Burrough's Barsoom novels have been hard to find for decades now- and when they are available, it's usually been some hideous low-quality POD set scanned from bad photocopies. It's probably been 50 years since there was a lovely complete set of the Barsoom books for under $50, but thanks to the upcoming movie, Disney has finally done it!
This review covers all 3 volumes (I can't imagine why you wouldn't buy the whole set). The stories are exciting first-wave SF pulp from the master who brought us Tarzan. Predating even Howard's Conan, these tales (first published from 1912 on) set a strong and fierce U.S. Civil War hero in the exotic setting of Mars (Barsoom), which is a wild place, and his adventures make up the first "Sword and Planet" material ever written. They inspired everyone from Issac Asimov to Ray Bradbury and Robert Heinlein.
Disney's books are thick trade-sized paperbacks, featuring great new cover art, well-edited reset text, and nice flowing watermarked designs on the first page of each chapter. They're a lovely package and a great deal, reminiscent of Gollancz's recent Lovecraft and Howard omnibus "black books." These don't include any extra essays, internal illustrations, or introductions, however: they're just straightforward and very pleasant copies of the classics.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2014
Format: Paperback
When Edgar Rice Burroughs began writing his Barsoom series, people didn't know a lot about Mars except that it seemed to have canals.

So Burroughs came up with his own elaborate fantasy world, populated by green barbarians, airships, multi-legged beasts and giant hairy white apes. John Carter is a bit of a Gary Stu, but at least he's a pleasant one -- and while "The Mars Trilogy:" starts rather slow, the following stories are fast-paced and brilliant.

During an Apache attack, ex-Confederate soldier John Carter takes shelter in a cave... and wakes on the planet Mars (or Barsoom), which is populated by Red Martians and the cruel Green Martian Tharks. When he falls in love with the Red Martian princess Dejah Thoris, John Carter embarks on a deadly quest to escape a Thark conspiracy...

"The Gods of Mars" sees Carter returning to Mars... but not to the place he left. Instead he is in a remote valley that is seen as the Martian afterlife -- anyone who goes there can never leave, and will be killed if they try. Those who are not devoured by the grotesque plant-men will be enslaved by White Martian Therns, and Carter soon finds that his friends and family are endangered as well...

"The Warlord of Mars" rounds off the story of John Carter, with Carter desperately trying to rescue his wife Dejah Thoris -- and the journey takes him on a chase across the full length of Mars. And as he ventures across the Martian poles, he encounters a whole new breed/color of Martians -- the cruel, cunning, technologically advanced Yellow Martians.

We now know that Mars is nothing like the Barsoom of Edgar Rice Burroughs' imaginings, but his alien world is a beautifully vivid, complicated one.
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By MadMax on July 27 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Like I wrote about the first of these series of books, it's fascinating to read thru the eyes and thoughts of Mr Burroughs as he tells a tale of science fiction on Mars from the 1900's.
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Im not much of a reader and my interest was sparked from the movie, I thought it was fantastic, The Critics and Disney not so much. You get the first three books in this one book, its an easy read not that small writing. I highly reccommend good bang for your buck .
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