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Collected Poems Owen Paperback – Dec 27 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: New Directions; Revised edition edition (Dec 27 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811201325
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811201322
  • Product Dimensions: 19.8 x 13 x 1.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #179,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
It seemed that out of battle I escaped Down some profound dull tunnel, long since scooped Through granites which titanic wars had groined. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful book, and one of the most powerful collections of anti-war poems ever put together. Wilfred Owen was not a man who was describing war from the safety of his own home. He was in the thick of it, and he paid the ultimate price.
'Anthem for Doomed Youth' may just be the most powerful of all anti-war poems, and it was voted 8th in a list of Britain's favourite poems in a BBC poll. This poem like Owen's work generally is written in an unpretentious style. His poetry is very moving, but without being sentimental. He's painting pictures with words, and the pictures aren't pretty.
All his renowned work is here, including 'Dulce et Decorum est', 'Disabled', and 'Mental Cases'. The notes are very interesting, as you'd expect from a literary heavyweight like C. Day Lewis, and there's also some of Owen's non war poetry, but that's still bleak!
If you want to buy any book of Owen's work, I'd recommend this one for starters.
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By Grady Harp TOP 500 REVIEWER on Feb. 13 2003
Format: Paperback
Seeing a posting for a new biography of Wilfred Owen reminded me to return to this anthology of his poems. Every war has produced great poets and WWI was fixed in our minds by the sensitive words of Siegfried Sassoon and especially Wilfred Owen. Writing from the trenches Owen managed to keep his eyes and mind and heart wide open while he witnessed the horrid plunder that surrounded him.. That he was able to transpose these experiences into the transcendentally beautiful poems that fill this book is a major wonder. Yes, WWII had WH Auden et al and the hungry monster machine of war was again made into words. And poets wrote of Korea, of Vietnam, and other countries' poets wrote of other wars. But again the threats and facts cloud our lives and world, and their words seemingly fall on deaf ears. Would that we could take heed of the poems of such perfection as those here by Wilfred Owen. This is the time to study this book........daily.
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Format: Paperback
War and poetry- two concepts infrequently mentioned, much less allied, in the same breath. Yet during World War I a number of writers took the horrific experiences of the Western Front and turned them into some of the twentieth century's finest, most disturbing poetry. Among these "war poets", Wilfred Owen is indisputably one of the greatest.

From the opening declaration " Above all, I am not concerned with Poetry... My subject is War, and the pity of War..." through the dreamlike madness of "Strange Meeting" to the elegiac fury of "Anthem for Doomed Youth", Owen hones the poetic craft he learned as a juvenile romantic versifier into a rapier on which he skewers the futility of the war, the blind official stupidity which kept it going, and the inhumanity shown by each side to its own men as well as the enemy.
Killed in action not long before the Armistice, Owen saw little publication of his work. However, his verse- carefully arranged, meticulously researched and documented by Cecil Day Lewis- is not only his epitaph. As relevant and affecting today as in 1918, it's as fine a counter-argument as any ever written against those who dismiss poetry as flowery nonsense. And for the rest of us? Few media can express the true nature and terrible costs of the First World War as eloquently as poetry at its finest can- and Owen provides it in plenty.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Branch on Nov. 19 2000
Format: Paperback
As a 13 year old boy I do not consider myself an expert on World War I poetry. Yet still I can tell that the poems of Wilfred Owen are a world apart from the likes of Rupert Brooke and other such optimists. For sure his portrayal of the war in such poems as 'Dulce et Decorum est' is more realistic than that of 'The Soldier' which talks of how as a soldier dies, he thinks of how glad he is glad that he has helped England, and how his heart is at peace under an English heaven. It seems to me that his superiors might have encouraged him to right pleasant poetry to please those back at the 'Home Front'. Yet Wilfred Owen's poetry also reflects his high level of education. Combining the skill and beauty of Brooke, with the harsh reality of such poems as 'The General' and 'To the Warmongers' to create a unique mastery of portraying the life of a first world war soldier.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 17 reviews
54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
Harrowing beauty March 27 2000
By Jonathan T. Smillie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
War and poetry- two concepts infrequently mentioned, much less allied, in the same breath. Yet during World War I a number of writers took the horrific experiences of the Western Front and turned them into some of the twentieth century's finest, most disturbing poetry. Among these "war poets", Wilfred Owen is indisputably one of the greatest.

From the opening declaration " Above all, I am not concerned with Poetry... My subject is War, and the pity of War..." through the dreamlike madness of "Strange Meeting" to the elegiac fury of "Anthem for Doomed Youth", Owen hones the poetic craft he learned as a juvenile romantic versifier into a rapier on which he skewers the futility of the war, the blind official stupidity which kept it going, and the inhumanity shown by each side to its own men as well as the enemy.
Killed in action not long before the Armistice, Owen saw little publication of his work. However, his verse- carefully arranged, meticulously researched and documented by Cecil Day Lewis- is not only his epitaph. As relevant and affecting today as in 1918, it's as fine a counter-argument as any ever written against those who dismiss poetry as flowery nonsense. And for the rest of us? Few media can express the true nature and terrible costs of the First World War as eloquently as poetry at its finest can- and Owen provides it in plenty.
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
The Bleak Genius of Wilfred Owen June 3 2004
By Paul Rance - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful book, and one of the most powerful collections of anti-war poems ever put together. Wilfred Owen was not a man who was describing war from the safety of his own home. He was in the thick of it, and he paid the ultimate price.
'Anthem for Doomed Youth' may just be the most powerful of all anti-war poems, and it was voted 8th in a list of Britain's favourite poems in a BBC poll. This poem like Owen's work generally is written in an unpretentious style. His poetry is very moving, but without being sentimental. He's painting pictures with words, and the pictures aren't pretty.
All his renowned work is here, including 'Dulce et Decorum est', 'Disabled', and 'Mental Cases'. The notes are very interesting, as you'd expect from a literary heavyweight like C. Day Lewis, and there's also some of Owen's non war poetry, but that's still bleak!
If you want to buy any book of Owen's work, I'd recommend this one for starters.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A good edition Aug. 20 2011
By John Everard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
At last, a good edition of Owen's poems! This one has a table of contents that works properly, and the poems are sensibly formatted. It is a pleasure to use and includes all Owen's best-known poems. I'd have given five stars except that, curiously, Owen's preface to his work is mis-formatted so that it is laid out like a poem instead of prose. But this is only a minor niggle (though perhaps one that can be fixed in a future edition?)
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic Feb. 2 2007
By G. Arsenault - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Here in this book you will find some of the finest poetry that any author from Britain has ever produced. Owen writes with style and uses words in such a beautiful way that one can only wonder how he was able to do it. His non-war poems are just as astounding as his war poems and this collection is great for any reader of poetry. Highly recommended, this book will not dissapoint.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Amazing Aug. 26 2010
By Megan Anne Jenkins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't typically like poetry, but I look at this book at least once a month. Wilfred Owen's writing is amazing. It helps that I'm interested in WWI in general, so if that's not of interest to you then maybe it's one to avoid. Five stars...

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