Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Combat Knife Throwing: A New Approach to Knife Throwing and Knife Fighting [Paperback]

Ralph Thorn
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Perhaps the easiest way to understand the basics of the style of knife throwing described here, especially if you are already familiar with conventional knife throwing, is to first realize why it bears no resemblance to hatchet throwing. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This book, which contains numerous very helpful illustrations by the author himself, teaches a new style of knife throwing, one where the knives don't spin around as they fly through the air. This is a more versatile, mobile, powerful, and perhaps most importantly, EASIER way to throw knives. According to the publisher:
Conventional wisdom among knife-fighting experts has it that knife throwing is a pursuit best left to circus performers, hillbilly theme parks, and hobbyists and that it is useless for combat or other survival purposes. In this ground-breaking book, Ralph Thorn differentiates between "circus" knife throwing and combat knife throwing, and reveals his style of knife throwing suitable for actual combat and knife fights.
The author, who has practiced his craft for decades, begins by showing you how to balance a knife for throwing -- and how to make your own throwing knives out of readily available materials. He shows you how to build targets (and what makes the best targets), and how to practice the various combat throwing techniques, with an emphasis on both safety and practicality. Ralph Thorn demonstrates the overhand, underhand, and sidearm throws, and discusses the situations where each style works best.
"One way of expressing the essential difference between circus-style and spear-style throwing is to say that in the former you try to make every throw as similar as possible and in the latter you can and should treat every throw differently. Circus-style throwing is a game of dexterity that requires a single, very specific skill; in this it is much like bowling or billiards.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars No contest Jan. 16 2004
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
If you are serious about using a knife to protect yourself or even to hunt with, this is the book to get. You don't have to have a target stand in one place. In fact, this is a skill builder. You get better the more you work with this method. It really is completely different. No knife spinning through the air--more of an arrow or a spear kind of action. Especially if you are ever in a position to have to defend yourself or your home from intruders, this could be a very valuable weapon/skill to have in your arsenal. I went to the Loompanics page to see if they had any other books on knife fighting, but although they have a lot of self defense books, this is the best on knife fighting that is out there anywhere!
A Fighting Stance from Seattle
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars back cover blurb Aug. 22 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Conventional wisdom among knife-fighting experts has it that knife throwing is a pursuit best left to circus performers, hillbilly theme parks, and hobbyists and that it is useless for combat or other survival purposes. In this ground-breaking new book, Ralph Thorn differentiates between "circus" knife throwing and combat knife throwing, and reveals his style of knife throwing suitable for actual combat and knife fights.
The author, who has practiced his craft for decades, begins by showing you how to balance a knife for throwing -- and how to make your own throwing knives out of readily available materials. He shows you how to build targets (and what makes the best targets), and how to practice the various combat throwing techniques, with an emphasis on both safety and practicality. Ralph Thorn demonstrates the overhand, underhand, and sidearm throws, and discusses the situations where each style works best.
"One way of expressing the essential difference between circus-style and spear-style throwing is to say that in the former you try to make every throw as similar as possible and in the latter you can and should treat every throw differently. Circus-style throwing is a game of dexterity that requires a single, very specific skill; in this it is much like bowling or billiards. Spear-style throwing can be like this if you want to stand still and throw for accuracy alone, but it can also become a freestyle sport, more like martial arts or skateboarding than like circus throwing. And, of course, it can be used for self defense." A truly path-breaking book, Combat Knife Throwing should be read by every sportsman, knife aficionado, and anyone interested in self defense.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but not great Oct. 11 2005
By L. A. Kane - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
There are some good "combat" techniques for knife throwing, but "life-saving material" as the title indicates, I kinda doubt it. The author does seem to know his stuff and the illustrations, while basic, are pretty clear and helpful. The quality of the writing, on the other hand, is a bit below par. Topics covered include an introduction to spear-style throwing, basics of combat knife throwing, balancing a knife for throwing, targeting, psychological/physical conditioning, hunting/recreation skills, and a bit of interesting historical/context stuff as well. There is also a fairly in-depth chapter for spear-style throwing as well as one for combat throwing techniques, insomuch as you can go in-depth in about a 100 total pages.

It's an interesting tome but not really a groundbreaking one. It also has some iffy ideas. The challenge as I see it is that the focus of the book is primarily on techniques without looking at the larger picture. I've frankly got a philosophical problem with throwing a knife in combat, even if you are in the military. First off, only weapons balanced for throwing will work properly for that application in the first place so you must be carrying a specialty device in order to be able to execute the techniques. Once you do throw your knife not only do you potentially lose your weapon, but you are also operating at some distance from your opponent. Unless you are in an active war zone, that probably won't play too well in court. After all, if you've got distance you'll have to explain to a jury why you couldn't run away avoiding the confrontation before it became violent in the first place as well as why you were carrying an offensive weapon (throwing knives just aren't defensive devices no matter how you spin it... and knives in general are hard enough to justify in court as it is).

I'm not all that great at knife throwing but I did learn some new stuff and improve a bit from this book. All in all, if you take it as an academic instruction book to develop throwing skills for fun or possibly even for survival/hunting it's a pretty decent reference. From a self-defense perspective, on the other hand, I think it is a bit off target.

Lawrence Kane
Author of Surviving Armed Assaults, The Way of Kata, and Martial Arts Instruction
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No contest Jan. 16 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
If you are serious about using a knife to protect yourself or even to hunt with, this is the book to get. You don't have to have a target stand in one place. In fact, this is a skill builder. You get better the more you work with this method. It really is completely different. No knife spinning through the air--more of an arrow or a spear kind of action. Especially if you are ever in a position to have to defend yourself or your home from intruders, this could be a very valuable weapon/skill to have in your arsenal. I went to the Loompanics page to see if they had any other books on knife fighting, but although they have a lot of self defense books, this is the best on knife fighting that is out there anywhere!
A Fighting Stance from Seattle
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible book Feb. 4 2005
By Mark - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Poorly written, run on sentences and endless babbling. I could not get past his constant knocking of end over end knife throwing. He spent too much time on the short comings of end over end throwing and not enough time on the technique of his style. I guess he wanted to fill his book with pages so he ran on and on about irrelevant things. What was valuable in the book could have been written on 5 pages max.
25 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars back cover blurb Aug. 22 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Conventional wisdom among knife-fighting experts has it that knife throwing is a pursuit best left to circus performers, hillbilly theme parks, and hobbyists and that it is useless for combat or other survival purposes. In this ground-breaking new book, Ralph Thorn differentiates between "circus" knife throwing and combat knife throwing, and reveals his style of knife throwing suitable for actual combat and knife fights.
The author, who has practiced his craft for decades, begins by showing you how to balance a knife for throwing -- and how to make your own throwing knives out of readily available materials. He shows you how to build targets (and what makes the best targets), and how to practice the various combat throwing techniques, with an emphasis on both safety and practicality. Ralph Thorn demonstrates the overhand, underhand, and sidearm throws, and discusses the situations where each style works best.
"One way of expressing the essential difference between circus-style and spear-style throwing is to say that in the former you try to make every throw as similar as possible and in the latter you can and should treat every throw differently. Circus-style throwing is a game of dexterity that requires a single, very specific skill; in this it is much like bowling or billiards. Spear-style throwing can be like this if you want to stand still and throw for accuracy alone, but it can also become a freestyle sport, more like martial arts or skateboarding than like circus throwing. And, of course, it can be used for self defense." A truly path-breaking book, Combat Knife Throwing should be read by every sportsman, knife aficionado, and anyone interested in self defense.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not a good resource Jan. 15 2007
By T. K. Rogers - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I ran across this book while doing research about knife throwing in movies. As a teenager I had spent countless hours in the back yard throwing every type of knife I could buy or make. Although I became proficient at distances under 15 ft I never discovered the holy grail of knife throwing: throwing a knife like a spear.

Later when I studied physics I learned why. An object can be thrown without rotation by applying the throwing force through the object's center of mass, easily done with a spear but not with a knife. A 6 foot spear also has at least 36 times more rotational inertia than a one foot long knife, making the spear over 36 times more resistant to rotation.

I was naturally intrigued to find a book claiming a knife could be thrown like a spear. Had I looked at the book's cover I would probably have immediately dismissed the notion. It shows a knife rotating into position and flying straight a short distance after leaving the thrower's hand, a physical impossibility. The illustrations and instructions inside the book were not much better.

I eventually tracked down a web site for the author and bought one of his DVD's. While stop action video shots were often too blurry to analyze, it looks like he does have a throwing style that minimizes rotation although it does not completely prevent it. The book's author, Ralph Thorn was shown at one point juggling several knives and is obviously a dexterous guy with a powerful throwing arm and a lot of skill. Even so, his low rotation throws in the DVD were typically at distances of less than 15 ft.

My advice: Ralph Thorn is a sincere guy who does have something to offer would-be knife throwers. However, I'd recommend buying one of his DVDs rather than his book. I'd also recommend not taking his explanations literally.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xc1697fa8)

Look for similar items by category


Feedback