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Come Twilight Hardcover – Oct 6 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (Oct. 6 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312873301
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312873301
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 14.5 x 4.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 635 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,103,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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Most of us in America have a tendency to think of places-particularly in Europe and Asia-as being sociologically monolithic, that is, ethnically and culturally intact for as far back as we can imagine. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
Or fourteenth, if you count "Out of the House of Life", a spinoff novel primarily about the character of Madeline de Montalia, a vampiric "childe" of Saint Germain, but also including some flashback scenes featuring an early Saint Germain.
Or seventeenth, if you also include "A Flame In Byzantium", "Crusader's Torch", and "A Candle For d'Artagnan", a spinoff series about Olivia Atta Clemens, an earlier offspring.
Throughout the series, the best part of these novels is the character of the count Saint-Germain himself; he is an unmitigated hero, not the anti-hero that one usually sees in vampire novels, and that's a fascinating change of pace. He always explains that he wasn't always the urbane, elegant, even-tempered, kind and sensitive individual that he is now; four thousand years ago, when he became a vampire, he was a typical ravening beast, but he outgrew it. This is a marvellous and original perspective on vampirism, and a delightfully optimistic outlook on humanity: that given sufficient time, ANYBODY can grow up, even a bloodthirsty creature of the night.
As a result, what we have in this series is a series of historical novels, set at various points along the very long time-line of Saint Germain's life. We generally see very little of other vampires, other than occasionally seeing those who Saint Germain has made vampires in previous books.
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By A. Trotter on Feb. 11 2003
Format: Paperback
This series is terrific. I read some of them a while ago, and am re-reading them now (and now there are even more in the series, so there's no danger of running out any time soon!)
There's some moral preaching, and the series does tend to be repetitive; the people follow trends. [...]
(Ok, I'm off my soapbox now.)
That said, that's my only beef with it. The writing is lovely, the letters to and from the characters and the notes describing what happened to the letters - weather they made it or not - are wonderful. The history comes to life and seems like a place just around the corner; you can see the mountains, touch the trees. You feel the differnt colors of the story.
This book represents a break from the series' tradition of plot: St Germain sets himself up in a place, meets people, gets himself a few friends and a few enemies, meets a lovely woman and sometimes an icky woman, gets into trouble and has to leave under bad circumstances. In this case, he makes a vampire out of a woman... and ooooh boy was that a mistake. It's sort of three related novelettes, taking place over some time. It isn't resolved completely at the end, thus the title of this review: I smell a sequel....
I actually like this book all the more for it's breaking from the traditional plot of her others. It's nice to know that while history may repeat itself, Chelsea Quin Yarbro doesn't have to.
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Format: Hardcover
If, like me, you've read all of the St. Germain Chronicles, you will want to read Come Twilight, but if you're just starting to read Yarbro's vampire books, I don't recommend you start with this one. Since the St. Germain books range through time from ancient Egypt to the outbreak of World War II, it is understandable that Yarbro has some difficulty in creating narrative tension concerning St.Germain, when she writes about his life during an earlier period of history. Nevertheless, there is less narrative tension here than in many of the books in the series. It is true, as mentioned in the review printed with this book, that Yarbro does not ascribe to historical persons 21st century attitudes. It is also true that this can be a weakness, as well as a strength, in her work. It can become tiresome to read about female characters with no scope for change in their lives, or people, such as Csimenae (the female vampire character in this book), who are incapable of learning or experiencing emotional growth and intellectual change. Even St. Germain and his relationship with Roger can
sometimes become just so much rote behavioral habit. Come Twilight made me long for the passion and fire and narrative drive of the earlier books in the series, such as Roman Blood, Path of the Eclipse, and Tempting Fate.
Since we know that St. Germain will survive into the 20th century, the narrative drive has to come largely through the supporting characters in the novels. The supporting characters in this particular novel, however, were just not sufficiently compelling to make me care about their survival.
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Format: Hardcover
Yarbro has developed quite a bit as a writer over the course of the Sanct Germain series. Her characters have more depth, and her sense of place is terrific. Her historical research is impeccable. However, she needs to come up with some different plot lines for the series because the novels have become predictable. The plots all seem to follow the same basic line: Sanct Germain is either already living someplace as a somewhat tolerated/accepted "outsider" or arrives and becomes a somewhat tolerated/accepted, he becomes involved with a local woman, he runs afoul of the local political hierarchy, he has to escape to somewhere else--sometimes twice in the course of the same novel. As much as I was intrigued by the picture of Iberia and its history that Yarbro presented, I put this book down before I finished a third of it because the story itself lacked something fresh about the characters or their interactions.
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