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Common Murder [Audio CD]

Val McDermid , V. L. McDermid , Vari Sylvester
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Jan. 1 2002 Isis

The second novel in the series featuring reporter Lindsay Gordon.

When her former lover is accused of murder in a women's peace camp, Lindsay must bring all of her expertise as an investigative reporter into play.

 

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Description

From Library Journal

Although a self-assured lesbian, London journalist Lindsay Gordon vacillates between supposed happiness with partner Cordelia and intermittent bliss with former lover Deborah. At the Fordham air base, while covering a violent clash between inhabitants of the women's peace camp and members of a local opposition group, Lindsay finds that police have charged Deborah with assault. When someone murders the alleged "victim," Deborah becomes the prime suspect. Consequently, the women ask Lindsay to investigate. McDermid (Crack Down, LJ 11/1/94) creates believable characters, full-bodied prose, and the usual lovelife complications. A good read.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Booklist

Lesbian reporter Lindsay Gordon goes to cover the long protest of a cruise missile base by a British women's peace encampment and finds there an attractive ex-lover who is accused of murder, not to mention routine assaults and an official cover-up. Although the book's plot is sometimes contrived and the pacing is uneven, Gordon is a gutsy heroine committed to action, righting wrongs, and solving mysteries who sometimes takes large helpings of abuse and plays both sides of the allegiance fence in order to succeed. As she battles to solve the problems of a monogamous relationship against a background of institutionalized secrecy, lies, and brutality, the author gives readers a strong sense of contemporary England, too. Whitney Scott --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most helpful customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Geddorff moy laaand ! May 28 2007
Format:Paperback
Val McDermid grew up in Kirkcaldy, a small mining community on the east coast of Scotland and studied English at Oxford University. The books she has written featuring Tony Hill and Carol Jordan have provided the basis for the popular "Wire on the Blood" television series, while her novels have won a number of awards, including the Macavity award, the Anthony Award and Grand Prix des Romans d'Aventure. "Common Murder" is her second novel and - like her first - features journalist, Lindsay Gordon. The book was first published in 1989.

Lindsay is now living in London with her girlfriend Cordelia and working for the Daily Clarion. She's assigned a story centred around the women's peace camp at Brownlow Common - which was set up to protest about the of nuclear weapons sited at the American airbase. Lindsay, as it turns out, is a supporter of and a regular visitor to the camp. (Cordelia, a noted and successful playwright, also supports the camps aims. However, since Cordelia's more stereotypically middle-class than stereotypically lesbian, she prefers not to get her wellies muddy. Instead, she sends letters to the Guardian and makes cash available to buy lentils for the camp). The differences with regards to the camp are, indeed, a sign that things aren't going terribly well in the relationship.

The problem for the women's camp is a local action group called Ratepayers Against Brownlow's Destruction, headed up by a local solicitor called Rupert Crabtree. RABD wants the camp removed from the Common since, they believe, it's being destoyed by the women living there. (You'd be amazed how much damage candlelight vigils and singsongs can cause). Of course, the damage to the common isn't entirely down to the women : the camp is regularly attacked by a vicious gang of mad, bullying bikers.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good easy and fun read Jan. 4 2002
Format:Paperback
After reading 'A Place for Execution' I sought out McDermids earlier works. This along with the rest of the Lindsay Gordon series are light, easy and fun reads. I found the characters to be a little left of center, but that is what certainly made them interesting!
The whole Lindsay Gordon series is like a young lesbian version of Murder She Wrote. A little more racey than Jessica Fletcher and a lot more fun.
If you enjoy English humour (dry wit and loads of sarcasm) and want some fun who dunnit mystery reads, read the whole series but do yourself a favor... start with number one and move through the series in order. Will make a lot more sense. Common Murder is number 2 in the series and a fun read, but Lindsay makes a lot more sense if you start with the first book which is 'Report for Murder.'
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3.0 out of 5 stars Liked it, didn't love it Nov. 7 2000
Format:Paperback
A short 250ish pages, it would have been better to have cut 100 pages and make this a short story without all of the unnecessary and meaningless character-developing diversions. The book runs along in 3rd gear most of the time, never really reaching a dramatic climax, which is really not good for a mystery, and the pretense is a little hard to believe: intrepid reporter for London tabloid gets everyone's help in solving murder mystery, even help from those who shouldn't be helping her. Certainly not the best mystery out there.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing, but a little dense Feb. 22 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I read this as an english person with knowledge, via the media, of the Greenham Common events upon which it as based. I am male, which may be a disadvantage, given the radical lesbian feminist label it adopts, but I enjoyed the alternative perspective. Shall I be honest ? It is not her best. Lindsay and her pals are a bit irritating. the prose is overlong and tends to lose dramatic point as you meander around the, rather hackneyed, plot. But... hey, do not take that as criticism Val. I am enjoing what you are doing and place you in the Paretsky and Parker class when it comes to crime fiction. Maybe my scepticism derives from the fact that it is hard for us anglos to sound glib, hard-boiled etc. Apart that is, from Terry Venables, another once upon a time crime writer. Keep up the good work !
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  9 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing, but a little dense Feb. 22 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I read this as an english person with knowledge, via the media, of the Greenham Common events upon which it as based. I am male, which may be a disadvantage, given the radical lesbian feminist label it adopts, but I enjoyed the alternative perspective. Shall I be honest ? It is not her best. Lindsay and her pals are a bit irritating. the prose is overlong and tends to lose dramatic point as you meander around the, rather hackneyed, plot. But... hey, do not take that as criticism Val. I am enjoing what you are doing and place you in the Paretsky and Parker class when it comes to crime fiction. Maybe my scepticism derives from the fact that it is hard for us anglos to sound glib, hard-boiled etc. Apart that is, from Terry Venables, another once upon a time crime writer. Keep up the good work !
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good easy and fun read Jan. 4 2002
By Christine G. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
After reading 'A Place for Execution' I sought out McDermids earlier works. This along with the rest of the Lindsay Gordon series are light, easy and fun reads. I found the characters to be a little left of center, but that is what certainly made them interesting!
The whole Lindsay Gordon series is like a young lesbian version of Murder She Wrote. A little more racey than Jessica Fletcher and a lot more fun.
If you enjoy English humour (dry wit and loads of sarcasm) and want some fun who dunnit mystery reads, read the whole series but do yourself a favor... start with number one and move through the series in order. Will make a lot more sense. Common Murder is number 2 in the series and a fun read, but Lindsay makes a lot more sense if you start with the first book which is 'Report for Murder.'
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Liked it, didn't love it Nov. 7 2000
By M. Anderson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A short 250ish pages, it would have been better to have cut 100 pages and make this a short story without all of the unnecessary and meaningless character-developing diversions. The book runs along in 3rd gear most of the time, never really reaching a dramatic climax, which is really not good for a mystery, and the pretense is a little hard to believe: intrepid reporter for London tabloid gets everyone's help in solving murder mystery, even help from those who shouldn't be helping her. Certainly not the best mystery out there.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Geddorff moy laaand! May 27 2007
By Craobh Rua - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Val McDermid grew up in Kirkcaldy, a small mining community on the east coast of Scotland and studied English at Oxford University. The books she has written featuring Tony Hill and Carol Jordan have provided the basis for the popular "Wire on the Blood" television series, while her novels have won a number of awards, including the Macavity award, the Anthony Award and Grand Prix des Romans d'Aventure. "Common Murder" is her second novel and - like her first - features journalist, Lindsay Gordon. The book was first published in 1989.

Lindsay is now living in London with her girlfriend Cordelia and working for the Daily Clarion. She's assigned a story centred around the women's peace camp at Brownlow Common - which was set up to protest about the of nuclear weapons sited at the American airbase. Lindsay, as it turns out, is a supporter of and a regular visitor to the camp. (Cordelia, a noted and successful playwright, also supports the camps aims. However, since Cordelia's more stereotypically middle-class than stereotypically lesbian, she prefers not to get her wellies muddy. Instead, she sends letters to the Guardian and makes cash available to buy lentils for the camp). The differences with regards to the camp are, indeed, a sign that things aren't going terribly well in the relationship.

The problem for the women's camp is a local action group called Ratepayers Against Brownlow's Destruction, headed up by a local solicitor called Rupert Crabtree. RABD wants the camp removed from the Common since, they believe, it's being destoyed by the women living there. (You'd be amazed how much damage candlelight vigils and singsongs can cause). Of course, the damage to the common isn't entirely down to the women : the camp is regularly attacked by a vicious gang of mad, bullying bikers. (Nasty stereotypical bikers). However, the story that brings Lindsay down has nothing to do with mad bikers and everything to do with Crabtree - he was, allegedly, assaulted by one of the women based at the camp. The woman in question turns out to be Deborah Patterson - who is, would you believe, an ex-girlfriend of Lindsay's. (It is such a small world, isn't it ? What a coincidence, that she turns up just as Lindsay's current relationship hits a sticky patch). Things, naturally, get even trickier when Crabtree is murdered close to the Common - not long after Deborah is released on bail.

On the whole, I'd describe "Common Murder" as a very quick and easy read - though McDermid's done much better than this. There's nothing special or memorable about the storyline and there's nothing particularly engaging about the characters. Lindsay 'solves' the whole thing far too easily - especially bearing in mind where the ending takes her - with the key people in the investigation giving her all the answers for no reason whatsoever. The promised "often comic prose" wasn't all that funny - I'd have been more inclined to laugh at the book, rather than with it at times. Very ordinary overall.
5.0 out of 5 stars Lindsay Gordon Book 2 Feb. 15 2014
By K. Winkleman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This is just as good as book 1, Report For Murder. The characters held their ground and developed even more. They are now good friends for me. Val has a unique way of layering mystery, hi-jinx, and romance that catches me in a net waiting on the next page. I look forward to more.
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