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Common Poisonous Plants Of North America [Paperback]

Nancy J Turner
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

April 15 1995
This book contains all the information needed to identify toxic plants, including house plants. Each plant is fully described and pictured for easy identification, and instructions for treating the poisoning victim are given.

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Review

"I found the information presented about the plants to be comfortably comprehensive."Diana Pederson, Grandiflora, September 2002

"It is a book that can prove its usefulness over and over again." Lynette Walther, Neighbors, December 15, 1999

"This book is clearly written, avoiding both botanical and medical technical terms. It is a handy reference to poisonous plants found in homes and buildings, gardens, urban areas, and in the wild throughout North America."Mary Ellen Lloyd, Gardener for the Prairies, January 1995

About the Author

Adam Szczawinski was fondly known as “the mushroom man” to the thousands of people who flocked to the BC Provincial Museum for mushroom identifications in the years when he was Provincial Botanist, from 1955 to 1975. A vibrant and colourful man, he can truly be characterized as “a mover and shaker” in the world of botany and in the protection of British Columbia’s ecosystems

Nancy J. Turner is an ethnobotanist and distinguished professor in the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria. She is also a research associate with the Royal British Columbia Museum. She resides in Victoria, BC.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Plants and parts of plants that contain potentially harmful substances in high enough concentrations to cause chemical injury if touched or swallowed are known as "poisonous." Read the first page
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Concordance
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Best poisonous plant book to date! July 2 2004
Format:Paperback
Common Poisonous Plants by Dr. Nancy Turner is the top of the line field guide to deadly botanical beauties you could come across while exploring the great outdoors.
This book is top quality in information, details, poisoning symptoms, and content! It is well worth the expense, which is a good amount. The book itself contains, plants, mushrooms, and fungi that could be hazardous to humans and animals alike. The main highlight, by far, is the toxicity section on each of the poisonous plants. The symptoms of ingestion, (contamination) are well described and could easily compell the reader to shudder. The symptoms are specific to every single plant, so that an infected person's life could easily and efficiently be saved. There is also a very helpful insight on treatment of potential poisoning.
The book is so specific, it even tells you the degree of toxicity! Unfortunately, this book is very expensive and going out of print. So, any hardcore naturalist or interested botanist should purchase this online ASAP!
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars good tips regarding wild and garden plants Nov. 16 2002
By Rachel
Format:Paperback
This is a beautiful book, both in the quality of the photos and the depth and readability of the information within. Perhaps its greatest strength is that it covers both native plant species and cultivated garden plants. This book is enough to convince any parent of the wisdom of edible plant gardening, and to shy away from the deadly, flashy ornamentals.
Was this review helpful to you?
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Dr. Turners books are without a doubt unparalleled regarding her ability to use the trust she has cultivated with the indigenous peoples of the PNW. This gives her an entirely unique and very interesting look at hows plant were used by the native populations of this and surrounding areas. The people who would find her writing fascinating would cut across many disciplines from of course not only botany but anthropology, archaeology, paleontology; perhaps even modern "new-age" religious seekers. Having said that though, I dearly wish she would quit deviating in to the field of mycology. I'm not exactly sure where she gets her info from, but I suspect that working under the auspices of the BC Provincial Museum, that she has elected to defer to the often antiquated mycological texts from the among the ranks of those in the possesion of professors in the back rooms of the museum that are gathering as much dust as are the books that they in turn rely upon for ID'ing the fungi.
Was this review helpful to you?
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Dr. Turners books are without a doubt unparalleled regarding her ability to use the trust she has cultivated with the indigenous peoples of the PNW. This gives her an entirely unique and very interesting look at hows plant were used by the native populations of this and surrounding areas. The people who would find her writing fascinating would cut across many disciplines from of course not only botany but anthropology, archaeology, paleontology; perhaps even modern "new-age" religious seekers. Having said that though, I dearly wish she would quit deviating in to the field of mycology. I'm not exactly sure where she gets her info from, but I suspect that working under the auspices of the BC Provincial Museum, that she has elected to defer to the often antiquated mycological texts from the among the ranks of those in the possesion of professors in the back rooms of the museum that are gathering as much dust as are the books that they in turn rely upon for ID'ing the fungi.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good tips regarding wild and garden plants Nov. 15 2002
By Rachel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a beautiful book, both in the quality of the photos and the depth and readability of the information within. Perhaps its greatest strength is that it covers both native plant species and cultivated garden plants. This book is enough to convince any parent of the wisdom of edible plant gardening, and to shy away from the deadly, flashy ornamentals.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best poisonous plant book to date! July 2 2004
By J. Connor - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Common Poisonous Plants by Dr. Nancy Turner is the top of the line field guide to deadly botanical beauties you could come across while exploring the great outdoors.
This book is top quality in information, details, poisoning symptoms, and content! It is well worth the expense, which is a good amount. The book itself contains, plants, mushrooms, and fungi that could be hazardous to humans and animals alike. The main highlight, by far, is the toxicity section on each of the poisonous plants. The symptoms of ingestion, (contamination) are well described and could easily compell the reader to shudder. The symptoms are specific to every single plant, so that an infected person's life could easily and efficiently be saved. There is also a very helpful insight on treatment of potential poisoning.
The book is so specific, it even tells you the degree of toxicity! Unfortunately, this book is very expensive and going out of print. So, any hardcore naturalist or interested botanist should purchase this online ASAP!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I really like this book - it includes what most edible plants books don't tell you June 9 2012
By SuperConnected - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I really like this book. I recommend it as a necessary companion to any edible plant book. I've put it side by side with my edible plant books and they aren't mentioning the dangerous things you should know. Ie. that the problem with wheat grasses is fungi that can make you very sick and is potentially deadly. I give this book lauds for pointing out the choking hazards - on barbed grasses and with other plants. It even tells about common spices - ie. nutmeg is poisonous and hallucinogenic if you eat over 10 grams. I'm glad this book really presses the point of several poisonous plants that are easily mistaken for edible ones. Let's not forget the real kid from the into the wild book most likely died from mistaking a poisonous plant with an edible one (very easy to do). If you're into edible plants, this is exactly the kind of book that you need to add to your collection.
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Nice Dec 25 2013
By Alyssa Edwards - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I purchased this as a gift for a survival pack for someone. The pictures illistrated are well done as well as in depth descriptions of what it looks like and what it does. Received very quickly. Would recommend to others.
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Have for Outdoorsmen Aug. 25 2013
By Elizabeth M. Mccarthy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The most comprehensive guide to the dangerous flora and fungi one might come across while camping and hiking. The entries are informative and surprisingly entertaining. The book includes color photos to aid in identification, as well as descriptions of the toxins and their effects.
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