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Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools (2nd Edition) [Hardcover]

Alfred V. Aho , Monica S. Lam , Ravi Sethi , Jeffrey D. Ullman
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 172.30
Price: CDN$ 159.87 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Book Description

Aug. 31 2006 0321486811 978-0321486813 2
Compilers: Principles, Techniques and Tools, known to professors, students, and developers worldwide as the "Dragon Book," is available in a new edition.  Every chapter has been completely revised to reflect developments in software engineering, programming languages, and computer architecture that have occurred since 1986, when the last edition published.  The authors, recognizing that few readers will ever go on to construct a compiler, retain their focus on the broader set of problems faced in software design and software development.

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Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools (2nd Edition) + Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs + C Programming Language (2nd Edition)
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From the Back Cover

This book provides the foundation for understanding the theory and pracitce of compilers. Revised and updated, it reflects the current state of compilation. Every chapter has been completely revised to reflect developments in software engineering, programming languages, and computer architecture that have occurred since 1986, when the last edition published.  The authors, recognizing that few readers will ever go on to construct a compiler, retain their focus on the broader set of problems faced in software design and software development. Computer scientists, developers, and aspiring students that want to learn how to build, maintain, and execute a compiler for a major programming language.

About the Author

Alfred V. Aho is Lawrence Gussman Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. Professor Aho has won several awards including the Great Teacher Award for 2003 from the Society of Columbia Graduates and the IEEE John von Neumann Medal.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the ACM and IEEE.

 

Monica S. Lam is a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, was the Chief Scientist at Tensilica and the founding CEO of moka5. She led the SUIF project which produced one of the most popular research compilers, and pioneered numerous compiler techniques used in industry.

 

Ravi Sethi launched the research organization in Avaya and is president of Avaya Labs.  Previously, he was a senior vice president at Bell Labs in Murray Hill and chief technical officer for communications software at Lucent Technologies. He has held teaching positions at the Pennsylvania State University and the University of Arizona, and has taught at Princeton University and Rutgers.  He is a fellow of the ACM.

 

Jeffrey Ullman is CEO of Gradiance and a Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. His research interests include database theory, database integration, data mining, and education using the information infrastructure.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the ACM, and winner of the Karlstrom Award and Knuth Prize.

 


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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars My bookshelf is more beautiful Dec 17 2013
By Jason
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The "Dragon" book makes any bookshelf look more beautiful, and is great for photo shoots and job applications.

Also, if you read the book your IQ will be increased by 3 points.

But seriously, this book is very well written. Compilers are not simple by any stretch of the imagination, but this book does well to explain them in detail. No previous knowledge or awareness of compilers is required, though a good understanding of programming is essential. I bought this book as a required text for a course, and by the end felt a much better appreciation for compilers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars excellent April 14 2012
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Entails all the important topics of compiler design and starts off with a creating a compiler for small program to demonstrate all the phases of compiling a program.. Not to mention lots of example and, projects and exercises
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another reviewer Oct. 9 2003
Format:Hardcover
What can you say about a book that has 41+ reviews, and all with close to perfect marks?
I bought this book not as it required so by almost any and all classes that teach about compiler design, but because I was interested in compilers and didn't have a chance to take class as part of my degree. It's a great book. Explains things well, and there are enough supporting material on the web that you can do a self paste study on your own and still get a lot out of this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another reviewer Oct. 10 2003
Format:Hardcover
What can you say about a book that has 41+ reviews, and all with close to perfect marks?
I bought this book not as it required so by almost any and all classes that teach about compiler design, but because I was interested in compilers and didn't have a chance to take class as part of my degree. It's a great book. Explains things well, and there are enough supporting material on the web that you can do a self paste study on your own and still get a lot out of this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction to compiler theory Aug. 15 2003
Format:Hardcover
I took a course on compiler design and implementation
and i would say that this book can really introduce
compiler concepts but its very pascal based.
Its forgivable considering that the book was written
ages ago before java could gain a foothold.
Overall, its a good introductory book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not well written May 13 2003
Format:Hardcover
If you find yourself struggling with this book, it is probably
not your fault. The book is not well written or well organized.
The chapters don't build on each other, so you might as well
dip into it wherever your fancy strikes. The chapters are
simply piles of information: there is no synthesis. The
reader has do all the work of putting it together.
Just a small, irritating example of what the book is
missing: the authors mention "context-free grammars"
over and over from the very start, but if you want to
find out what the term signifies, you need to hunt with
the help of the index until you come upon a poor explanation
somewhere in the middle of the book. And context grammars
are never explained at all, even though they are mentioned.
The reader is left with the impression that she or he should
somehow know already what these grammars are (in fact,
grammars are not explained, either!).
A lot has been learned about compilers since this book was
written, so it's time to retire this chestnut
and start anew.
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3.0 out of 5 stars An overly academic out-of-date, but classic work April 27 2003
Format:Hardcover
This book, in its time, was a classic. When it was published
it was one of the best books available on compiler design.
Like the compiler design books of its time, this book has an
academic bent. Compared to later works, it is overly formal,
using obscure notation which is not really needed.
This book may have laid the foundation, but it has been replaced
by better books. In particular, "Advanced Compiler Design
and Implementation" by Steven S. Muchnick and "Optimizing
Compilers for Modern Architectures" by Randy Allen, Ken Kennedy.
The introductory compiler books by Grune et al or Appel may
be useful for those who without compiler design experience.
In all cases these book concentrate on real compiler
implementation issues and do not get mired down in formal
notation.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Ahh, the "Dragon Book" April 9 2003
Format:Hardcover
You can hardly search the internet for compiler books without seeing the "Dragon Book" rear its head. Intrigued by its reputation as the authority (not to mention being very hard to read,) I had to buy it.
This book is very theoretical! That may be good or bad, depending on how used you are to handling theory. It is well organized. The authors break the compiler into front end and back end, and then further into symbol table, lexer, parser, semantics, intermediate code generation, code generation, and code optimization. There are chapters dedicated to each.
I didn't read the whole book (so I'm still a mere mortal,) only the recommended introductory sections followed by some browsing. This was out of personal interest - not for a class. By the time I was through chapter 7 or so, I sat down and started planning a [cheesy] Pascal compiler (they give the grammar as a project.) I'm not done yet - heh - but I haven't been frustrated by anything the book hasn't covered yet. Therefore, I can testify that this book has really guided me well.
However, like I said, if you space out in the presence of pure crystalline theory, then this book is not for you. Usually the first 3 sections of a chapter are 100% theory, then the "how to" section, followed by advanced theory. It may help if you have taken some courses in abstract algebras - I'm not kidding! Also, a (the) major flaw this book has is the mysteriously missing pages of code. There is no complete compiler (of anything significant) to study (which is why it gets 4 instead of 5 stars.) The only thing close is a 5 page infix to postfix translator written in archaic C. This book gives you the tools, not the answers. Be warned.
Still, I recommend it to the dauntless and couragous... dragon slayers. [Hack-snort]
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