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A Concise History of Canada's First Nations Paperback – May 6 2010


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A Concise History of Canada's First Nations + The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; Second Edition edition (May 6 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195432428
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195432428
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 1.8 x 17.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 599 g
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #92,987 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Publisher

20 maps, 52 photos, 55 boxes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Olive Patricia Dickason, professor emeritus, University of Alberta, and adjunct professor of history, University of Ottawa, is the author of several books, including The Myth of the Savage (1984, 1997) and The Law of Nations and the New World, with L.C. Green (1989). Dr Dickason is a Member of the Order of Canada and recipient of the Aboriginal Life Achievement Award, Canadian Native Arts Foundation. Through her distinguished career she has remained proud of her Metis heritage. William Newbigging is an associate professor and head of the history department at Algoma University. He has taught Aboriginal history for nearly 10 years. Dr Newbigging also makes a point of regularly attending Aboriginal learning conferences and Native studies workshops in order to learn more about the needs of Aboriginal students. He has recently finished his first book, History of French-Ottawa Alliance, to be published with University of Nebraska Press.

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
terrible book. the text did not flow. the information was not presented concisely. it was not detailed in the information. useless. uninformative.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Good, balanced history of Canada's First Nations Nov. 25 2007
By Arthur Digbee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book tells Canada's history from a Native perspective. She strives to be even-handed in dealing with all of Canada's nations. For example, she recognizes Norse and Basque peoples and their interactions with the First Nations even before the French arrived. She has also written the book in a very careful, balanced style, and there are no polemics here. I should note that Dickason is herself of Metis heritage; the Metis are of mixed Native-white heritage and now comprise their own nation. Doubtless that personal background contributes to her perspective here.

Dickason excels at presenting the big picture, especially in the period up until about 1850. She does not focus on the details of individual battles or treaties, but discusses trends and analyzes patterns. That wider perspective breaks down a bit as the book gets closer to the present day, with greater emphasis on individual events and people.

Because of this analytical approach, the book does not follow chronology strictly. For example, Chapter 14 begins with Native resistance and its successes in the 1960s and 1970s before looking further back at a League of Nations case in the 1920s. After that, the chapter whipsaws forward again to century's end. I prefer this kind of history, where themes dominate sequence, but others might not.

Though fairly long itself, this book is a condensation of Dickason's longer history (which I haven't read). Calder was in charge of cutting the book down, rewriting sections as needed to make the condensation work. She has succeeded - - this book feels as if it was written this way, not adapted or condensed from a longer work. It feels thorough, though not exhaustive.

I'd give it 4.5 stars if I could; it misses out on 5 stars by not having that extra something that would appeal to people who aren't already interested in these topics. All in all, it's a very good book to have on your shelf if you are interested in aboriginal history in North America, Canadian history, or the intersection between them.
2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
this book is so racist! Oct. 10 2008
By A. MacNeil - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was shocked at the content in this book! This book is written by a non-first nations person to be used by non-FN people to tell the story from a very one sided view. It was on the reading list for my FNAT class at university and the instructor has told us to not believe everything you read. She has directed us to read books written by FN ppl (hard to find cause they don't sell as well) and make our own opinions. This book uses theories that have been proven incorrect many times over. This book does not present both sides of the story and quite often gives incorrect information about the FN people. BTW I am not FN but will tell you that after reading this book I am embarassed to be white!

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