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The Confession of Brother Haluin Hardcover – Large Print, Jul 1989

4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Hardcover, Large Print, Jul 1989
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 321 pages
  • Publisher: Ulverscroft; Large Print edition edition (July 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0708920322
  • ISBN-13: 978-0708920329
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 789 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,385,679 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

The worldly-wise and compassionate Brother Cadfael makes a welcome, 15th appearance. On his deathbed, Brother Haluin confesses to the abbot and Brother Cadfael that 18 years previously he had fallen in love with Bertrade de Clary, whose mother had forbidden their marriage. The girl had later died as a result of herbs he had given her mother, Adelais de Clary, to abort their baby. Haluin unexpectedly recovers from his fall, however, and he now is determined to make a pilgrimage to the girl's tomb. But when he and Brother Cadfael arrive at Hales, they find Adelais de Clary strangely indifferent and no tomb for Bertrade at the church. Haluin insists on traveling to Elford, the chief seat of the de Clarys, in search of Beltrade's final resting place. The two monks find more than the tomb there, and on their homeward journey through Staffordshire they encounter forbidden love, a hastily arranged marriage, violent emotions and murder. It is up to Brother Cadfael to untangle the threads that bind the past to the present to avert another tragedy. Though the plot is somewhat obvious, Peters knows her period well and does not strike one false note in this thoroughly entertaining medieval mystery.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

Review

Gripping and knowledgeable The Spectator --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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By Bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on Oct. 10 2013
Format: Hardcover
Hard core Cadfaelians may find this particular story too simple as you can pretty much from the beginning assumes what is about to happen. Yet Ellis Peters still keeps her writing style and has points to make. She will keep you off balance so you are not sure that you know the answer. In an interview on the DVD of Brother Cadfael - A Morbid Taste for Bones (1994), Ellis peters said that because they have trouble adapting her stories for video, which she would attempt to simplify the stories.

Although I have read the book and am sad that they did not make a video of this journey, I must say that Stephen Thorne's reading gives an added dimension to the story allowing you to race ahead or contemplate the past as he make the characters come alive with his unique voice for each.

This of course is book 15 in the series and so many things have been said, does not need to be said again. So lets hear the confession of brother Haluin and sojourn trough 12th century England with him as he takes a journey of the soul.

One Corpse Too Many: The Second Chronicle of Brother Cadfael
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By Bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on Sept. 21 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Hard core Cadfaelians may find this particular story too simple as you can pretty much from the beginning assumes what is about to happen. Yet Ellis Peters still keeps her writing style and has points to make. She will keep you off balance so you are not sure that you know the answer. In an interview on the DVD of Brother Cadfael - A Morbid Taste for Bones (1994), Ellis peters said that because they have trouble adapting her stories for video, which she would attempt to simplify the stories.

Although I have read the book and am sad that they did not make a video of this journey, I must say that Stephen Thorne's reading gives an added dimension to the story allowing you to race ahead or contemplate the past as he make the characters come alive with his unique voice for each.

This of course is book 15 in the series and so many things have been said, does not need to be said again. So lets hear the confession of brother Haluin and sojourn trough 12th century England with him as he takes a journey of the soul.

One Corpse Too Many: The Second Chronicle of Brother Cadfael
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By Bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 25 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Hard core Cadfaelians may find this particular story too simple as you can pretty much from the beginning assumes what is about to happen. Yet Ellis Peters still keeps her writing style and has points to make. She will keep you off balance so you are not sure that you know the answer. In an interview on the DVD of Brother Cadfael - A Morbid Taste for Bones (1994), Ellis peters said that because they have trouble adapting her stories for video, which she would attempt to simplify the stories.

Although I have read the book and am sad that they did not make a video of this journey, I must say that Stephen Thorne's reading gives an added dimension to the story allowing you to race ahead or contemplate the past as he make the characters come alive with his unique voice for each.

This of course is book 15 in the series and so many things have been said, does not need to be said again. So lets hear the confession of brother Haluin and sojourn trough 12th century England with him as he takes a journey of the soul.

One Corpse Too Many: The Second Chronicle of Brother Cadfael
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The confessions of Brother Haluin is another in ellis peters series of mystery tales set in a Benedictine monastery In Civil War England in the late 1130's and 40's. the main characters are Brother Cadfael, a former Crusader who enetered the monastery late in life[age 40] his chief nemisis Prior Robert tennat[who is a strict by the book prior] ,the Priors ferret like assistant,brother Jerome, and the Abbot,Radulfus,who stands above the fray[and always sides with Cadfael] Cadfeal is a renown herbalist,and is forever off helping some sick or downtrodden individual. He has a herb garden where he is able to get a respite,and where some of the more intersting dialogue occurs. Hugh Beringer is the Sherrif of the Shire{he was introduced in the second book, one corspe too many]and Cadfaels staunch ally and dearest friend{Cadfael is godfather to The Beringers son, Giles}. Cadfael, by virtue of his long stint abroad, is far more worldly then his fellows, and by default is an ametuer sleuth. In this volume, the deep winter has decended upon the town of Shrewsbury. the heavy snows are imperelling the roofs of the monastery enclosure, and some monks are snt, in shifts[due to the intense cold] to repair the problem.Brother Haluin,a calligrapher of the highest order[and perpetual penitent] has an accident, and confesses what he believes is a deathbed confession to the Abbot and Brother Cadfeal. He recovers, though mangled for life, and sets out on a pligrimage to make amends for his wrongs, and of course, Cadfael accompanies him...things,of course ,do not turn out quite as expected. ZThis is a fine addition to the series,the writing is still fine, the scenes of 12th century england gripped in a mad civil war are well done, and the deep, profound wisdom and compassion of Cadfael shine forth, making him one of the more appealing creations in modern crime fiction. In all, good great fun,and excellent book in the series
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