Confessions of a Sociopath and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 17.52
  • List Price: CDN$ 27.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 10.43 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Confessions of a Sociopath: A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight Hardcover – May 14 2013


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 17.52
CDN$ 14.43 CDN$ 13.90

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Confessions of a Sociopath: A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight + The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain + Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Among Us
Price For All Three: CDN$ 50.08

Show availability and shipping details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Crown (May 14 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307956644
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307956644
  • Product Dimensions: 20.9 x 15 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 431 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #42,311 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A. Volk #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Sept. 22 2013
Format: Hardcover
Here's the fundamental part of this book- it's either a lie, or it's a life story told by a pathological liar. I approach this book as someone who doesn't study psychopathy directly, but as someone who knows numerous researchers who do. Psychopathy is a condition defined by a few key categories of behavior: a lack of empathy (you know the emotions, you just don't feel them), grandiosity, lying, manipulation, impulsivity, and a lengthy rap sheet (some would add sexual promiscuity). The word sociopath is a slightly more ambiguous term, but it means much the same thing (developed by sociologists who didn't like the psychologist term psychopathy) and it's what M E Thomas likes to call herself because it seem less derogatory to her. This book is her life story. Unfortunately, reading it I couldn't tell if this was someone pretending to be a psychopathy to sell books, or an actual psychopath.

It's full of errors and contradictions. For example, she had a normal childhood. She had great parents. She had parents who abandoned her and her brother at a park, just driving away. Her father beat her, her mother was cold and flippant. She wants anonymity, yet she was on Dr. Phil. Which version is true? She claims to be a successful psychopath, something that's getting more press these days. But she reveals that it's only by the graces of lady luck that she's not in prison. Never mind her impulse to follow and kill a man, she's a thief, a fraud, and an incredibly reckless driver or cyclist. She claims not to harm people, but describes one of her favorite joys as learning about and then ruining people. She claims to be a good friend at the same time as she lists numerous friendships ruthlessly terminated when she is bored.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Donna Milward on Sept. 25 2013
Format: Hardcover
This book started out fascinating. I felt as though I were reading a novel from the villain's point of view. On page eighteen, she asks, "Have I earned your hostility?" Indeed she had, just for the pool incident alone, and I kept reading in the hopes of finding out why this woman thinks the way she does.

It could have been half as long as it was if she'd quit telling the reader how great sociopaths are. She repeatedly tells the reader how they are actually genetically superior than 'empaths', and she has quotes and statements to back up her claims.

The book is a constant commentary on how charming and how likable she is right after she tells you about the awful things she does just for the sake of controlling and abusing others. I often caught myself rolling my eyes. She's like that associate you just wish would stop talking.

This book is just another way of patting herself on the back. I'm actually irritated at myself for buying this book because I have no doubt it amuses her to know we may not like her, but she still got our money anyway.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Reader Writer Runner TOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 4 2013
Format: Hardcover
How many books out there describe life as a sociopath from the point of view of a sociopath? None until the recent release of "Confessions of a Sociopath," a memoir that attempts to dispel myths and stereotypes about the diagnosis. The title of the book alone poses so many questions: how candidly could the author write about her feelings? Could someone lacking emotional depth pull off an entire book? Would she come across as charismatic and beguiling or cruel and boring?

At times, it feels like M.E. Thomas (an appropriately selfish pseudonym) has produced a gripping and important book. She fascinatingly recounts how the logic of punishment frequently eludes sociopaths; she has lost count of the times she's gotten sick from eating rotten food because the "risk of injury never sinks in." At others, she sags and goes on for pages about her (uninteresting) childhood or repeats her thoughts about the nature/nurture mystery while simultaneously humanizing and dehumanizing herself.

Readers must also keep in mind that pathological lying and lack of realistic goals partially define sociopathy. Thomas undermines her own claims of leading a moral life by cheerfully recounting leaving a baby opossum to drown in her swimming pool and disowning a friend whose father was dying of cancer because the woman wasn’t fun to be around anymore. By the book’s final stretch, which includes reminiscences of a hedonistic year in Brazil, the chilliness and self-absorption have taken their toll and roller coaster ride has worn thin.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Kindle Edition
Reading a book about those without conscience by an author who claims never to feel regret, provides a fascinating look into psychopathy.

The medium is the message.

Eleanor Cowan, author of : A History of a Pedophile's Wife: Memoir of a Canadian Teacher and Writer
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback