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Crazybone Hardcover – Jul 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: CARROLL & GRAF PUBLISHERS (July 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786707305
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786707300
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.7 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,503,022 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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By little lady blue TOP 100 REVIEWER on Jan. 25 2013
Format: Hardcover
The first of the' Nameless detective' story series came out in 1971 so I have come to this later than most. I started with "Schemers" (2009) & "Camouflage" (2011) both of which I so enjoyed I went looking for more.

Clearly Mr. Pronzini has come a long way since his early days because this one from 2000, the 26th in the series, is nothing like the 2009 & 2011 stories. Frankly, if it had been the first one I read I wouldn't have been interested in any others.

Where the later ones show a clever sharpness in the writing & composition, this earlier one is bogged down in unnecessary descriptions of people, places & things, even in what may very well be Mr. Pronzini's personal musings about the times. Chapter 7 in its entirety could have been omitted since it seemingly had nothing whatsoever to do with anything.

Even the `mystery' felt a little diluted. The child Emily was the one spark in this otherwise uninspiring, over-written addition to the series.

This disappointed me after the first two were so enjoyable. Strange, authors usually get washed-out the longer they stay with a series, in this case it seems to be the opposite.
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By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Nov. 25 2003
Format: Hardcover
Crazybone marks yet another important turning in the Nameless Detective series, a turning that is seldom seen in mystery fiction. Anyone who is a fan of the series should be sure to read this fine book.
If you have not read any other Nameless books, I suggest that you at least read Hoodwink, Double, Shackles and Hardcase before this one. Much of the pleasure of this book comes from the context of the series. You can enjoy Crazybone without that context, but it will be only a 3 star book if you lack the context. I have reviewed almost all of the books in the series (and tried to avoid spoilers) so feel free to look for those comments. The series begins with The Snatch and follows on in order with The Vanished, Undercurrent, Blowback, Twospot, Labyrinth, Hoodwink, Scattershot, Dragonfire, Bindlestiff, Casefile, Quicksilver, Nightshades, Double, Bones, Deadfall, Shackles, Jackpot, Breakdown, Quarry, Epitaphs, Demons, Hardcase, Spadework, Sentinels, Illusions, Boobytrap, Crazybone, Bleeders and Spook.
Any reader who thinks that most men are lecherous will find that this book mostly confirms their convictions.
As Nameless nears 60, he is becoming more crotchety and less in tune with what's going on. In some ways that's good. He's principled in a world in which many are not. On the other hand, he's also unable to open his assistant's computer to get a message. That's really weird to anyone who enjoys the online world.
In recent books, Mr. Pronzini has been adding more and more humor. In Crazybone, you will find one of the funniest descriptions of attending a spouse's company cocktail party that you can imagine. In the process, Nameless even acquires a name (not really his). It would be fun to see what Mr.
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Format: Hardcover
I've liked most all the "Nameless" series of the prolific Bill Pronzini, and as the character has aged and the circumstances of his own life become more prominent in the plots, have liked the books even more. His past problems with his partner made for surprising and tense books; his ongoing relationship with Kerry, his own aging, his life in Sanfrancisco are all of a texture that make all the books' generally limited plots enjoyable. Here the "mystery" is not much of one, the action of the search for a solution as to why an insurance settlement is refused is pretty predictable and the outcome summary; but the domestic part of the book, a young child drawn into Kerry and "Nameless'" life makes for real emotion. So, it's a good book, about the same as most in the series. But what is increasingly less enjoyable in these books (and those by several other writers) is what I call the Travis McGee/John D. McDonald syndrome: lots and lots of social comment, mostly bleak reflections on the decline of American culture into the abyss: lamentations on modern architecture, art, strip malls, juvenile behavior, and on and on. I suppose it's in part an attempt to give the books social substance. It may be a unconscious tribute to Raymond Chandler--but if it is that, it misses the point. Chandler observed the world around him; Nameless and kin are grumpy old curmudgeons, whining about what they don't have, have lost, or don't want. Nor do I like a lot of the emblems of the modern age that they skewer and resent, but muttering and mewling without humor, balance, or, really, relation to the plot at hand is at best distracting, at worst rather pathetic. These are thin books, quick reading; they needn't be so sour.
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Format: Hardcover
When I started reading Bill Pronzini's Nameless Detective series earlier this year, 27 books seemed like an awful lot to plow through. When I finally finished "Crazybone," though, I wished there were 27 more! I feel like I know "Nameless" and Kerry better than some of my own relatives! Happily, "Crazybone" is one of the best entries in this series; I loved the subplot with Nameless' mother-in-law (author of a private eye series starring tough-guy detective Samuel Leatherman) trying to snoop into the suspicious death of one of her elderly neighbors. I heartily recommend going back to "The Snatch" and reading all 27 Nameless books in order; what a wonderful thing Bill Pronzini has accomplished by writing this series.
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