Quantity:1

Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 15.51
& FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.00. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express CA
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Crisis? What Crisis? Original recording remastered


Price: CDN$ 5.00 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
35 new from CDN$ 3.09 5 used from CDN$ 12.13 2 collectible from CDN$ 150.66

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Buy 2 qualifying CDs for a special price of $15 Here's how (restrictions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

Crisis? What Crisis? + Even In The Quietest Moments + Crime Of The Century (3LP Vinyl)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 46.21

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 17 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • ASIN: B000068FXR
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,398 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Easy Does It
2. Sister Moonshine
3. Ain't Nobody But Me
4. A Soapbox Opera
5. Another Man's Woman
6. Lady
7. Poor Boy
8. Just A Normal Day
9. The Meaning
10. Two Of Us

Product Description

A hit in the States and an even bigger one in the UK, this 1975 LP features more distinctive Supertramp keyboard work on great tunes like Ain't Nobody but Me; Another Man's Woman; Lady , and the Pink Floyd-ish Sister Moonshine .

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Terrence J Reardon on June 20 2004
Format: Audio CD
English art rockers Supertramp's fourth album entitled Crisis? What Crisis? in November of 1975. Like its predecessor, 1974's Crime of the Century, the album was once again co-porduced by the band and Ken Scott. Crisis was the second album by the classic lineup of the band which were the two singer-songwriters Rick Davies(keyboards) and Roger Hodgson(guitars and occasional keyboards), saxophonist/woodwind expert John Helliwell, bass player Dougie Thomson and drummer Bob C. Benberg. Thhis new lineup did a superb job fleshing out the sound and managed to do a great job of embelishing the prog pop sound that Davies & Hodgson had developed. Hodgson's interest in spiritual themes comes to the fore with this album(although it was hinted at previously). Roger's guitar driven one-two punch of Easy Does It and Sister Moonshine kick the album off in full throttle. The latter track is called by some as the lost sequel to The Beatles' Here Comes The Sun(Hodgson is a huge Beatles nut). Hodgson also contributed the lovely A Soapbox Opera, Lady, Meaning and the acoustic-tinged closer Two of Us. Davies' crafted four songs on this album starting with the shuffling Ain't Nobody But Me(a minor hit when released). That track was the first in a long string of Davies sung songs that played with the traditional pop love song in new and surprising ways. The playing on this particular track showcased the strengths of the band's new sound. Despite its quirkiness(and had an instrumental arrangement that matches the quirky, anti-love song sentiments) but doesn't try to coast on just that single merit. Rick's other tracks like the rocking Another Man's Woman, the ballads Poor Boy and Just a Normal Day(which had Roger sharing vocals) are also great tunes.Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Terrence J. Reardon on May 13 2004
Format: Audio CD
English art rockers Supertramp's fourth album entitled Crisis? What Crisis? in November of 1975. Like its predecessor, 1974's Crime of the Century, the album was once again co-porduced by the band and Ken Scott. Crisis was the second album by the classic lineup of the band which were the two singer-songwriters Rick Davies(keyboards) and Roger Hodgson(guitars and occasional keyboards), saxophonist/woodwind expert John Helliwell, bass player Dougie Thomson and drummer Bob C. Benberg. Thhis new lineup did a superb job fleshing out the sound and managed to do a great job of embelishing the prog pop sound that Davies & Hodgson had developed. Hodgson's interest in spiritual themes comes to the fore with this album(although it was hinted at previously). Roger's guitar driven one-two punch of Easy Does It and Sister Moonshine kick the album off in full throttle. The latter track is called by some as the lost sequel to The Beatles' Here Comes The Sun(Hodgson is a huge Beatles nut). Hodgson also contributed the lovely A Soapbox Opera, Lady, Meaning and the acoustic-tinged closer Two of Us. Davies' crafted four songs on this album starting with the shuffling Ain't Nobody But Me(a minor hit when released). That track was the first in a long string of Davies sung songs that played with the traditional pop love song in new and surprising ways. The playing on this particular track showcased the strengths of the band's new sound. Despite its quirkiness(and had an instrumental arrangement that matches the quirky, anti-love song sentiments) but doesn't try to coast on just that single merit. Rick's other tracks like the rocking Another Man's Woman, the ballads Poor Boy and Just a Normal Day(which had Roger sharing vocals) are also great tunes.Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Kelly on March 25 2003
Format: Audio CD
This album just never got the credit it deserved. I'm glad I purchased the CD (used to own the cassette) because I forgot how great it truly is. Songs like "A Soapbox Opera" and "The Meaning". Supertramp is usually associated with their big three "Breakfast", "Crime" and "Even In ... " but this one is right up there with them. If you don't have this in your collection get it because you won't be disappointed. Outstanding!!!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Julian A. Belanger on June 20 2004
Format: Audio CD
"Crisis, What Crisis" isn't one of Supertramp's more popular albums, but to this listener...it is one their best. Consider it their version of Pink Floyd's "Animals". Underrated, but classic.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kilgore on Dec 6 2003
Format: Audio CD
I loved Supertramp for two albums, Crime of the Century is their best but Crisis? What Crisis? is right up there. I think the rest are garbage pop tunes that have nothing to offer. If you like Supertramp and you haven't heard this ablum do yourself a favour and try it, this one is so much better than Even in the Quietest Momest or Breakfast. I bought all of Supertramp's albums in my time but now only have Crime and Crisis in collection
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Audio CD
Their most under-rated and overlooked album, it's also my personal favourite. Brighter than Crime of the Century, yet free of the over-ripe sentiments of Breakfast in America, this album strikes just the right balance between introspection and listen-ability.
None of the songs on this album ever became radio hits, but this is highly misleading and more than a little unfair to the quality of the songs. There is some great music on this album; Sister Moonshine, Lady, The Meaning, Two of Us. However, my favourite has to be Soapbox Opera, a moody and atmospheric piece that effectively conveys our modern society's sense of spiritual drift.
This is not a deeply philosophical work, and those looking for "meaning", "depth" or "originality" should look elsewhere. Tramp preferred peasant food to haute cuisine, a preference that opened them up to charges of superficiality throughout their career. Again, unfair, considering that their stated purpose was to bridge the gap between the excesses of progressive rock and the shallowness of mainstream pop.
A consistent and rewarding album, this is one of the two Tramp albums (along with Quietest Moments) that have stood the test of time. Whereas, Century seems dated and Breakfast has always been overrated, Crisis improves with age. Perhaps this has something to do with the fact that none of the songs were played to death on radio; an ironic silver lining to a greater cloud of injustice.
A word needs to be said about the recording. This digital remastering is superb and renders obsolete the prior CD recording. If you have the first CD, the improved clarity and energy in the second remastering makes it a worthwhile purchase. If this is your first Crisis purchase, make sure you are getting the right CD and aren't wasting your money on a lousy earlier effort.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback