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Croatia: A Nation Forged in War; Second Edition Paperback – Sep 10 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; 2nd Revised edition edition (Sept. 10 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300091257
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300091250
  • Product Dimensions: 2.4 x 12.5 x 19.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,555,279 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Free Thought on Dec 6 2000
Format: Hardcover
The book was informative, but it did not go into great detail. The period of 1918-41 was glazed over in a few pages, and the extent of Serbian tyrrany and crimes were not fully covered. The massacre of hundreds of peaceful demonstrators on Ban Jelacic Square (where democratic Croatian protesters were gunned down by the Serbian genedarmerie occupation police) on December 5, 1918, was not mentioned, nor the Brusane massacre, nor the Sinj massacre; nor the extent of Serbian domination and hedgemony in the police and military, as well as the brutal repression of ethnic, civil, human, and national rights. One cannot just breeze over the banning of all free speech, press, assmebly, and culture; nor the Serbian police force's beating, jailing, and liquidation of the democratic opposition. Unfortunately, Lampe, Judah, Tanner, and many others do; by doing so, they commit the fallacy of denying the antecedent. Mr. Diljas accuses Tanner of using "predominately Croatian and pro-Croatian sources;" well, can Mr. Diljas tell us who those sources are? If that downplays the legitimacy of the book, how would Mr. Diljas explain the legitimacy of his books (being that he is a Serb and a Communist) and books written by Serbs and Communists over this past century. Thus, it would be that Mr. Diljas and most books written about Croatia and the ex-Yugoslavia (and all of the former Republics) were not and are not free of Serbian nationalistic and Communist idealistic romanticism, and should be read with Critical reserve.
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Format: Paperback
My fiancee and I were both really eager to read this book, we'd heard good things about it and are planning a trip to Croatia. Unfortunately, it's so poorly typeset that it's a real struggle to read! We both got about 15-20 pages into it and just couldn't continue, we were getting headaches (no joke). The problem is that the text is just too densely set, there's no breathing room whatsoever. Yale Press has a done a real disservice to the author.
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Format: Hardcover
As the people of a young country, U.S. citizens do not typically relate to the deep ties many foreign cultures have to their homeland. Consequently, Americans may struggle to understand ethnic conflict around the world. Marcus Tanner, an award winning British journalist, explains the historical dynamics of the Balkans in "Croatia: A Nation Forged in War." Events in Croatia's history, like the influence of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches, the Mongol and Ottoman invasions, alliances with the Hungarian and then the Habsburg monarchies, Nazi Germany and Communist coups, and the recent conflicts with Yugoslavia are discussed thoroughly in this detailed study.
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Format: Hardcover
This thoughtful and well written book presents Croatian history without the usual Serbian propaganda. Perhaps Aleksa Djilas (see previous review) could write an additional chapter and include the assorted Serbian fairy tales about "what the Croats are really like". Djilas' famous father made a career out of living in Serbia and bugging Serbia's ruling mafia. The younger Djilas, on the other hand, lives at Harvard and strives to please the same psychotic criminals his father antagonized. Considering the crimes of Serbia over the past decade, this interesting approach to dealing with one's oedipal problems might be a good subject for Tanner's next book.
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Format: Hardcover
A book on Croatian history is most overdue. This is one of the rare books on Croatian history written in English and therefore a must read. Croatian history is rarely analysed, with most of its 2000 or so years virtually ignored. Fortunately there is now a book which will give an objective and comprehensive overview of this ancient nation from the 7th century to the present. It is well written and easy to read. Recommended. Added analysis can be found in Noel Malcolm's 'Bosnia: A short History'.
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Format: Paperback
Mr Tanner sets out to dissolve a nation's thousand year history and crystallize it into a three hundred page book.The fact that he attempts to do this by cramming in as much detail as he can possibly muster results in a cursive, factual catch-all leaving little room for analysis or explanation.
Having said this, Mr Tanner is to be praised for the undoubted erudition of his research. Detail piles upon detail, fact upon fact. The reader soon realises that here is history of the "this happened,followed by this, resulting in this" genre. The danger in presenting us with this wealth of historical minutae is that it too frequently makes for laborious consumption and all too often results in literary indigestion. This is particularly so when Mr Tanner negotiates the post-medieval, pre-19th Century period of Austro-Hungarian imperialism. Disappointingly, he fails to enlighten the reader as to any relevance that this period may have to the fierce nationalism so much in evidence today.
We are all aware of the cataclysmic events of recent Balkan history. Such hatred, brutality and blind ethnic partisanship is crying out for sound, unbiased analysis. Unfortunately, Mr Tanner does not provide us with this analysis though he does at least try to present his facts in an objective, unbiased manner. For instance, he even-handedly devotes one page to the horrors perpetrated by the Croatian Ustashe at Jasenovac and a further page to the slaughter of tens of thousands of Croats by the (largely Serbian) partisans at Bleiberg.
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