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Croz

David Crosby Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 11.53 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Description

Product Description

2014 release from the singer/songwriter best known for his work with CSN and The Byrds. Croz, David Crosby's first studio album in over 20 years, is a collection of 11 new tracks from one of America's most notable singer/songwriters and two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Famer. Croz features guest appearances from Wynton Marsalis, Mark Knopfler, Leland Sklar and Steve Tavaglione.

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By Rob A
Format:Audio CD
You must hear this record, especially the vinyl if you can (I have both). This record not only sounds as good as anything from the 60's-80's era, but could possibly be the best sounding record ever. I must admit I wasn't really familiar with David's earlier solo works, so I bought this record only based on some good reviews I read.

It has everything, great songs, great vocals, fantastic collaborating musicians, and a production that is stunning beyond words. Simply beautiful. Thank you David and all those involved with the making of this record for blessing us with this masterpiece.
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5.0 out of 5 stars love it April 30 2014
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
David Crosby at his best. It is amazing that he sounds the same as he did in the Crosby Stills Nash days. Beautiful harmonies and amazing guitar. Definitely worth the buy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Still excellent after all these year April 27 2014
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
This is a first rate CD, worthy of five stars.
When I first started listening to it, it reminded me of an updated version of "If I Could Only Remember My Name", but after a second and third listening, I have to add much improved to that description.
David's voice is still as sweet as ever, even at his advanced age.
The acoustic guitars and the harmonies are a pleasure to listen to.
James Raymond, who is Crosby's son, co-wrote 7 of the songs, played piano, synthesizer, synth bass, Fender Rhodes, virtual pedal steel and co-produced the CD. Talk about multi tasking.
The subject matter of the songs is a bit of a mixed bag: a senior's tired depression with the state of the world mixed with, what David once called "hippie hopefulness".
If you enjoyed Crosby's work with Crosby, Stills and Nash, as well as his previous solo albums, you will love this CD.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  228 reviews
169 of 183 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crosby's Incandescent Late-Career Masterpiece Jan. 28 2014
By Stephen Silberman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
David Crosby occupies a paradoxical position in American music. He is simultaneously one of the most celebrated and one of the most underappreciated musicians of his gifted generation -- a generation that produced the timeless voices and visions of Bob Dylan, James Taylor, Neil Young, and many others. He is also one of the most quietly influential. By singing Dylan's early songs in the Byrds in crystalline harmony, Crosby gave the folksinger's career a significant boost. After hearing an unknown waif named Joni Mitchell sing in a club, he got her a recording contract that ensured her maximum creative freedom and produced her first record, launching her on her own intimitable career path. Crosby also turned the Beatles on to Ravi Shankar, and the world of pop music was never the same again. His music has been consistently fascinating, stretching the boundaries of pop, informed by jazz and world music as much as folk -- as Miles Davis knew when he recorded Crosby's sublime "Guinnevere" -- but as a result, his songs have never gotten the radio play of the tunes by his gifted bandmates in Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young. [Disclosure: I've been listening to Crosby's music since I was a teenager in 1970, and have had the pleasure of knowing him since the early 1990s.]

From the first bars of "What's Broken," it's obvious that two-time Rock-and-Roll Hall of Famer Crosby is not resting on his Woodstock laurels for a second. This is one of the freshest, most innovative, and most vital albums of the year -- in no small part because Crosby forged an intimate musical collaboration with his brilliant son, James Raymond, whose keyboards and orchestral imagination turn these songs into cinematic landscapes that haunt your dreams. A poignant song about a drone bombing in the Middle East, "Morning Falling," is like nothing Crosby's ever done, with its heart-wrenching photographic lyrics, Arabic-inflected melody, and aching woodwinds by Steve Tavaglione. "Dangerous Night" is equally devastating, built on a set of chords by Raymond that has the majesty of Bruce Hornsby's most memorable melodies and a set of lyrics that render a clear picture of the troubles of humankind in the 21st Century while delivering a stirring message of consolation. On every track, Crosby and Raymond -- with the help of illustrious guests like Mark Knopfler and Wynton Marsalis, and a brilliant rhythm section -- stretch themselves, creating an album of folk/pop/electronic grandeur that manages to sound completely new and yet also like a classic David Crosby recording. When Crosby and guitarist/vocalist Marcus Eaton lay down a spread of luminous harmonies a minute into "What's Broken," you'll know you could be listening to no one else. There is darkness here -- check out the spare, desolate, sharply-drawn portrait of a young hooker in Amsterdam in "If She Called," sung solo with electric guitar -- but there is also redemption in "Radio" and "Find a Heart," two of the most upbeat and sparkling songs Crosby has ever recorded, tributes to the transformative power of love and compassion.

Crosby set a very high standard for himself with his first solo album recorded in 1970, "If I Could Only Remember My Name," but here he reaches that standard by coming at it from an unexpected angle, playing with the seasoned wisdom of age and the daring and ambition of youth, in the company of a band that deeply comprehends and extends his idiosyncratic vision. It's obviously a must-buy for his fans, but even for listeners who are only familiar with Crosby's moody contributions to CSNY, it's worth picking up as an exploration of new emotional and musical territory by one of the most fertile musical minds of our times.
55 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A prodigal son returns in style Jan. 28 2014
By Sid Nuncius - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
What a relief! The comeback of a musician I have always admired after 20 years, much of them spent in turmoil and rehab, could have been dreadful but I think this is a really good album. I had an advance copy and it's taken quite a few listens to settle in, but I'd expect that from David Crosby - you don't turn to his music for undemanding comfort food.

It's sobering to realise that it's nearly 45 years since I first heard Guinevere and Wooden Ships, because after all those years they are still among my favourite tracks ever. Those elements which made Crosby's music so brilliant and distinctive back then are still evident in many places on this quite varied album: the modal, broken guitar chords in untypical sequences, the meandering almost recitative-like interludes and the great, often beautiful, often thrillingly singable passages all feature strongly. It doesn't always work for me here (as it didn't always then), but for the great majority of this album it works really well.

There's quite an introspective air over the album. The feel of the tracks varies from the harmonically rich and fairly jazzy like the opener What's Broken and Set That Baggage Down through the quite beat-driven (like The Clearing) to the spare and quite amazing If She Called, a song about the emotional turmoil of a prostitute. The lyrics are diverse and generally very good, often reflecting on the vicissitudes of life and moving on from damage and pain. You know, too, that when he sings "I'm a troubled soul searching for peace in the night," in the lovely Dangerous Night, for example, it comes from deep experience and is a lot more than just another song lyric.

The songs are often set in quite CSN&Y-ish harmonies, which is just fine by me, because all those groups who have been compared to them over the last few years haven't really sounded like them, and it's great to hear that sound again - sounding fresh and alive, too. Guest appearances by Mark Knopfler and the great Wynton Marsalis are both excellent, and Crosby's own singing and guitar work are still very fine.

The album has its less good spots. For example, Time I Have is a fine track, but begins:
"People do so many things that make me mad,
But angry at how I want to spend the time I have;
Cognitive dissonance they call it
And I wonder just how small it
Could be made to be
In me."
It's really not David Crosby's finest lyrical hour, however important and heartfelt what he's trying to say. These moments are few and brief, though, and I think this album has real quality.

If Croz made this album to prove that he's still got it, then I think he has succeeded spectacularly. Old fans like me should be well satisfied - a genuine Prodigal Son has returned and I hope he'll stay to produce more like this. Warmly recommended.

(I can't eat all this fatted calf on my own, by the way. Would anyone care for a slice?)
56 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crosby's first solo album in 20 years has sweet vibe Jan. 28 2014
By Tom - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
"Croz," the first solo album in over twenty years from Byrds and CS&N legend, David Crosby, is simply a joy to listen to. The eleven mellow tunes feature Croz in fine singing voice backed by his son, James Raymond, on keyboards, with a number of other fine musicians including Crosby regulars Steve DiStanislao on drums and Shane Fontayne on guitar along with guitarist Marcus Eaton and woodwind virtuoso Steve Tavaglione. There are also appearances from heavyweights, bassist Lee Sklar and Dire Straits' Sultan of Swing, guitarist Mark Knopfler (who lays down a stunning track on "What's Broken"). The songs are primarily gentle melodies with Raymond's jazzy keyboards front and center but there's still enough of a beat and driving lead guitar with plenty of engaging hooks and choruses to keep your foot tapping. Wynton Marsalis's exquisite trumpet solo on "Holding On To Nothing" is a gem. Long-time fans will relish this ethereal collection from Crosby who proves he can still create excellent music at the age of 72. Given his history it's a minor miracle that Croz is still making music.

Fifty years ago David Crosby co-founded The Byrds with Jim (later Roger) McGuinn, Gene Clark, Chris Hillman, and Michael Clarke. The band's distinctive "folk-rock" sound featuring McGuinn's chiming Rickenbacker electric twelve-string and Crosby's sublime high harmonies directly influenced the Beatles and Dylan and launched a myriad of imitators. By the time The Byrds began recording their fifth album, The Notorious Byrd Brothers, Crosby had emerged as the leading creative force within the group but was unceremoniously fired by McGuinn and Hillman due to personal and artistic differences. Crosby landed on his feet, to put it mildly, by teaming with Stephen Stills of Buffalo Springfield and Graham Nash of the Hollies to form Crosby, Stills, and Nash. The band recorded two mega-albums (with Neil Young on Deja Vu) but internecine squabbles quickly blew it apart. In addition to his delightfully spacey first solo disc, Crosby recorded several enjoyable albums with Nash but soon spiraled into severe drug addiction. There were a few less-than-memorable CS&N albums but the music stopped altogether with Crosby's incarceration. Following his release he recorded a couple of solo albums, participated in several CS&N (and sometimes Y) projects, and teamed with his son in the underrated CPR (Crosby, Pevar, Raymond). A liver transplant and several other health issues have slowed Crosby but haven't stopped him. As a two-time inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Crosby adds to his legacy with "Croz" as an accomplished (and often courageously eccentric) songwriter and one of the sweetest singers and harmonists in the history of Rock and Roll.

Postscript: CBS News reported on 2/18/14 that Crosby had a cardiac catheterization and angiogram the previous week after a routine cardiac stress test. According to a statement, "The left anterior coronary artery was found to be 90% blocked, and two stents were placed to provide blood flow to his heart muscle. He did not have a heart attack, though it is certain that had he chosen to ignore his doctor's urgent recommendation, it would have led to one." Crosby postponed the remainder of his tour to promote "Croz" but says he plans to tour with CS&N beginning March 4th.
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's David Crosby Jan. 28 2014
By monkuboy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
As soon as I began listening to this album I knew it was David Crosby. Well he has a pretty distinctive voice so how would I not know it was him? What I mean is that if you removed his voice and just played everything else, I would still be thinking these are David Crosby songs. The chords, structure, arrangement - they all carry the feel of his other recordings and adding his wonderful voice to it (which gives no clue that he is 72 years old) wraps it into one nice package.

The songs on this album are not derivatives of earlier songs; that is, you wouldn't hear something and think oh, this sounds like X. But they all sound like David Crosby, and I mean that in a good way. As soon as I found out the CD was available on preorder I didn't hesitate to click the buy button, and I'm glad I did.

To my ear some tracks are better than others but it is an overall strong effort, with a nice variety. I'm not going to go into specifics about the songs. Rather, if you like David Crosby, he does not disappoint in this offering. It's a fine album.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb effort - the best since If I Could Only Remember.... Jan. 28 2014
By Mark A. Cartier - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Superb album with some classic Crosby tracks (Set That Baggage Down, Radio, What's Broken for example). The best solo LP of his (including CPR) since his first (which gets the only five star rating as far as I am concerned). Some really nice songs on here - reminiscent of Crosby/Nash in their heyday (If She Called etc.). CSN did a great version of "Radio" on their last tour. Mark Knopfler sits in on "What's Broken" and Wynton Marsalis on "Holding Onto Nothing". The musicianship is excellent (check out Find A Heart). Crosby is in fine voice, a REAL pleasure to listen to. As mentioned in another review - the drum programming on a number or two is a little too loud and interferes (which is too bad - Dangerous Night) more than it enhances. Sounds very digital, doesn't have the brightness at times of an analog recording. But make no mistake, this is an excellent record and worthy of many listens. Very happy I bought it and you will be too.
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