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Cuisipro 747301 BPA Free 4-Cup Fat Separator, Clear/Black


List Price: CDN$ 35.00
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  • Make healthier sauces by eliminating the fat but keeping the flavour. This fat separator easily...
  • Sold individually
  • Capacity: 4 cups/1 litre

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 21.6 x 16.5 cm ; 340 g
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 Kg
  • Item model number: 747301
  • ASIN: B008N86YLK
  • Date first available at Amazon.ca: Nov. 8 2012
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,926 in Home & Kitchen (See Top 100 in Home & Kitchen)
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Product Description

Product Description

Make healthier sauces by eliminating the fat but keeping the flavour. This fat separator easily and conveniently separates the fat from the gravy. Pour your gravy into the separator and watch the fat rise to the top, so that lean gravy can be drained from the bottom using the easy drain feature. Made of durable and heat-resistant Tritan material the separator features an oversized straining basket that catches unwanted bits. The separator has a clear body with convenient measurement markings.
Size: 4 cup
Capacity: 4 cups/1 litre
Materials: Heat-resistant Tritan
Care: Dishwasher safe
Warranty: 25 years

From Amazon.ca

Make Clearer, Healthier Gravy, Soup and Stock With the Cuisipro Deluxe Fat Separator

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The secret to the Cuisipro Deluxe Fat Separator is a plug that blocks the spout preventing fatty liquids from A new fat separator from Cuisipro makes healthy gravies, stocks and soups by separating out more fat from meat juices then other fat separators do. splashing into it and leaving a fatty residue.

The plug, attached to the lid, snugly blocks the hole at the base of the gravy spout when the lid is closed. The spout remains empty and plug securely in place until the fat and meat juice have separated and the lid unsnapped.

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The nylon lid fits snugly into the high heat resistant plastic measuring cup. The large nylon strainer in the lid is easy to fill and catches unwanted gristle and food particles so gravies and stocks remain clear and smooth.

The measuring cup is also an oversized, 4 Cup/1L capacity, and features easy to read measurements. The cup features a large handle that is easy to grip and comfortable to hold when pouring and a large spout that is particularly useful for pouring large batches of gravy or stock. The Cuisipro Deluxe Fat Separator is also dishwasher safe.

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Features:
  • Easy Drip feature separates sauce from fat easily and effectively
  • Sauce is released from the bottom of the Fat Separator and the silicone plug controls the release of sauce and fat
  • Made of see-through, durable, and heat resistant Tritan material
  • BPA Free
  • Clear window with measurements
  • Easy to Disassemble and clean; top shelf dishwasher safe
  • Oversized straining separates large food particles from sauce
  • 4 cup capacity

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Verified Purchase
Fantastic - very happy with purchase. So glad I watched "The Marilyn Denis Show" and saw this on display a few years ago and finally purcahsed one.
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By Rose Huston on Dec 29 2013
Verified Purchase
Love this separator, used it at Christmas for the first time, so easy to use and worked like a charm.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By javamuse on March 29 2013
Verified Purchase
I have been making all our stocks, soups, and gravies from scratch since I was a teenager (and that was a long time ago). Separating the fat or just getting the pieces of ingredients out can get quite frustrating; this separator works for both.

Over the years I've tried many different tools, which generally fall into one of 2 categories: the measuring-cup style with the spout coming out the lower portion of the cup, and the soup-ladle style with the plug on the bottom (I haven't been able to find one of these lately, in case you've been looking).

I haven't had great luck with either: the measuring-cup style doesn't work well unless you have a LOT of liquid in there, and the soup-ladle ones I've tried have always been very small (~1 cup capacity) and tend to make a mess on the counter when you refill them.
This separator combines the best of both styles: it has a 4-cup (1 L) capacity and lets the stock out the bottom like the ladle-style separator. It consists of 3 pieces: the bowl (the clear part in the picture), the rim which includes the handle and red plug, and a separate strainer (looks like a lid in the picture). All the pieces can be separated for washing, and the unit can be used with or without the strainer.

For the measurement-conscious: there are embossed markings for cups, oz, and mL. For the mess-conscious: there's a lip around the bottom, which raises the base enough to minimize counter-mess when you put it down. I still use a plate under it, but at least you don't need a bowl!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Happy Customer on Jan. 6 2013
Verified Purchase
This makes making gravy so much easier. large size holds quantity of liquid and the grease magically disappears out the bottom
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 45 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
I LOVE THIS! Oct. 25 2012
By ChrisNY - Published on Amazon.com
Vine Customer Review of Free Product
I have never gotten the hang of the separators with the spout way at the bottom. Even after all the fat floated to the top, it would still get into the gravy when you poured it out no matter how slow/hard I tried. So when I saw this I had to check it out. As with the spout style separators, you pour the gravy through the strainer top, wait for the fat to rise but then all you have to do is press the red lever on the handle to open the plug at the bottom of the cup for the gravy to come out. IT WORKS SO WELL!!

The bottom is indented so it sits flat when not in use/with the plug in place so it's easy to store/nothing poking out. The 4 cup container is enough for a family, though not for a crowd. It's also way easier to clean than the ones with a spout.

UPDATE 11/23/2012 - Taking one star off because even after all the fat rose to the top, if you open the bottom you can see the fat "sucked" back into the gravy again. To keep that from happening, you have to only remove a little at a time. That's fine when this is used for serving but not when you want to take the gravy out/put it in a gravy boat (and you're in a hurry!).
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Slight leak...Love the design...25 year warranty..Update - Didn't leak w/2nd use Oct. 28 2012
By Lynn - Published on Amazon.com
Vine Customer Review of Free Product
I love, love, love that the Cuisipro Fat Separator drains from the bottom!!!
But, it does leak a tiny bit around its drain. For that reason, I always set it on a dishrag or a folded paper towel. Be careful, too, if you need to move it across the room. I had some drips on the floor. I am willing to put up with the slight leak because the Cuisipro 4-Cup BPA Free Fat Separator is much easier to use & does a much better job of separating meat juices from the fat than the conventional fat separator that pours from a spout.

The nylon strainer kept all the meat particles from entering the broth & is large enough that I was able to pour the meat juices into the cup w/o making a mess.

The last plastic fat separator I owned cracked when I poured hot meat juice into it. The Cuisipro is made with high heat resistant plastic, so I'm hoping it won't crack...but it has a 25 year warranty & I plan on calling them if it cracks. Register your product online.

It is easy to clean, the strainer lifts out. The cup unscrews. It's dishwasher safe.

How to use:
~Pour sauce into separator through the straining basket.
~Wait for the fat to rise to the top.
~Press down on red lever to lift plug & release sauce.
~Release lever when fat line reaches the bottom.
~To disassemble, hold handle firmly & turn Tritan base clockwise.

Do not use in the microwave.

UPDATE:
I just used this fat separator a 2nd time & it didn't leak at all! My star rating went from 4 to 5 stars.
However, I will always have a paper towel or dishrag handy in case it leaks.
It is so easy to use & I forgot to mention earlier that the cup has measurements on the side.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
REALLY GOOD! Best I've used to separate fat from broth Oct. 31 2012
By Joanna Daneman - Published on Amazon.com
Vine Customer Review of Free Product
UPDATE:

Definitely, wash this in the dishwasher. Comes out sparkling!

I made 2 batches of beef barley soup that starts using shin meat. My method requires defatting the broth before continuing with cooking the vegetables. This separator was easy to use and did a great job. It really up the process considerably. It was easy to ladle the top layer of fatty broth into the separator, and it holds a lot. Then I depressed the lever, the plug opened and I drained it right back into the pressure cooker. The fatty broth went into a waste bowl. Wow. Works GREAT. BIG THUMBS UP! Recipe for the soup is at end of review.

This fat separator is well designed. For one thing, it holds four cups of liquid. And it's made of a heat resistant, BPA-free plastic. And the drain is in the bottom with a silicone plug, which is clever. You push the lever and the plug releases, letting fat-free broth or gravy out of the bottom. There is a strainer to catch vegetables, chunks, etc, which would clog the drain hole.

My previous fat strainer was one of those pitchers of ABS plastic that had a spout issuing from the bottom. It only held about a cup and the plastic cracked with use over time and of course, no one cared about BPA's back when my old one was the only kind you could buy.

There is one worry; the plug will fail (distort, shrink, etc) over time. It is silicone, which is a relatively stable plastic, especially to heat (like your silicone hot pads, for example.) And it is slightly rubbery in texture, making for a decent seal. I was a bit concerned, but silicone was a good choice for this part of the unit.

Wash in dishwasher--at first I thought, no way. But after slathering it by hand with dish liquid, and then trying it in the dishwasher, I was delighted to see how sparkling clean it comes out. I put the big unit in the bottom and the lid on my top rack. Really cleaned up well.

In short, this is the best, easiest fat separator I've used, and it is great. I make a lot of soups and broth and now I can strain out the fat immediately instead of having to chill it and wait.

Recipe:
Beef Barley Soup

2-3 pieces of shin beef. I used 3 fairly good sized pieces, and the result is kind of a "Chunky Soup" consistency, but you can adapt to thinner version by cutting down on the meat.

Quart of water

Place in a pressure cooker such as the Nesco 4-in-1 or any pressure cooker. Do not fill past 3/4 full or as recommended in the manual. Cook 25 minutes on pressure. Vent naturally. Remove meat, trim and cut it into cubes. Reserve.

Defat the broth with the Separator. Return to pressure cooker.

3 carrots, peeled and cut into thick slices
3 celery stalks, w leaves, sliced
1 large yellow onion, diced
2 medium large red potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
1 leek, well washed, white part chopped (optional)
3 tbs pearled barley
1 bay leaf
1-2 tbs of Minor's Beef Paste or a bouillon cube or packet (I use Minor's or Goya bouillon)
optional: parsnips, turnip, corn, chopped fresh Roma tomato. Even zucchini.

Put all vegetables and the reserved meat into the pressure cooker, correct seasoning (I didn't need salt but pepper is nice.) Cook 15 min. on high. Let vent. Cool, serve. Better the next day but darn good anytime.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Makes the task so easy I actually do it Feb. 20 2013
By Esther Schindler - Published on Amazon.com
Vine Customer Review of Free Product
A gravy separator has long been on my list of Stuff It'd Be Nice to Have, but there was never a screaming need to buy one right now. As a result, when this item showed up in my Amazon Vine selection, it was an "Oh yes! Gimmeee that!" I'm happy I did.

The Cuisipro fat separator does exactly what it promises: It makes it easy to separate the fat and other cooking liquid to make better (or at least healthier) gravies. Instead of painstakingly spooning off the extra grease from the pan -- or, shhhhh, not bothering to do so -- you pour the pan liquids into this container, which feels essentially like a 4-cup measuring cup in your hand. Give it a few minutes for the fat to rise to the top (don't you have other things to do? chop the shallots while you're waiting), then press on the handle, and the non-fat liquid strains out the bottom, into your gratefully-awaiting bowl (or just back into the pot, depending on what you're roasting). There's a strainer to catch "unwanted gristle and food particles," as the description puts it, "so gravies and stocks remain clear and smooth." It works a treat.

The lid unscrews from the "bucket" easily, so you can throw it in the dishwasher. (From experience, though: The plug mechanism likes to drop down from the top dishwasher rack and stop the blade from spinning around, meaning that nothing on the top rack gets clean. Just saying. Spend a moment turning the gizmo in the right direction, or your spouse, too, may growl at you.)

I'm often loathe to bring into the kitchen yet-another-item that does only one thing, but this isn't all that big, and I think it'll earn its keep at my house. If you're shopping for a gravy separator, it's easy for me to recommend this one.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Sophisticated and effective design Oct. 28 2012
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Vine Customer Review of Free Product
My experience in the past with a fat separator was with an Oxo brand that had a long spout that started near the bottom of the pitcher through which you poured the liquids while the fat pooled at the top. This is the standard type which uses gravity and the natural action of fats rising to the top to pour from the bottom to get the separated juices. While I found that type of fat separator to be acceptable, it did have one serious weak point - the long spout was tough to clean by hand. As a marginal second weak point, it was sometimes hard to get out most of the liquid without tipping in some of the fat.

This fat separator attempts to get around those issues by putting a hole in the bottom of the cup and using a plug to stop it up while the juices separate. Having no spout to clean is definitely a plus. Also, the juices drain straight out the bottom so you can very easily see when the fat reaches gets near the bottom and there is much less of a chance of fat coming out as you don't need to tip it to extract the juices.

The design troubled me a little at first because I received it with the cap screwed on, but the plug, a plastic armature with a rubber stopper at the end, was not in the hole. I thought that it may not effectively plug the hole and juices might leak out while waiting for the fat to rise to the top. Fortunately, this was not the case. The plug blocked the hole 100% until I pressed the lever on the handle to release the liquid. It is definitely a more sophisticated design. It was also easy to exercise control on the rate of the liquid draining out using the control lever on the handle. Being able to stop it on a dime is important to get as much juice out as possible while leaving the fat behind.

My main concern about this product is that, in the long run, the plug may not always work. Through time and wear, I'm not certain that it will block the hole completely, even if it does so perfectly now. That being said, this isn't the kind of kitchen gadget that sees heavy use anyway. It usually is used only for roasting bigger birds and making gravy. It would probably take many years before my concerns would have a chance to be realized. My only other concern is that, as someone who washes dishes by hand, I think that the grooves in the plastic armature that controls the level may slowly get gunk in them which would be hard to wash out. This is a very small concern (and a scrubbing with a toothbrush might allay such concerns), but I wouldn't want bacteria from embedded juice or fat that accumulate through time to get into my food.

Given the common design for fat separators like the Oxo one that I used to have, I do believe this is a superior design. However, I also believe that it carries some risks that old-style ones do not. The fussier the mechanism, the greater the chance something might go wrong. If you're an infrequent gravy maker (say, a three or four times a year for special occasions), I'd say this is a good choice. If you're making it all of the time, I'd go for the old style one which has some problems, but still works and doesn't have a mechanism that may wear through time.