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Cujo [Hardcover]

Stephen King
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (210 customer reviews)

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Kindle Edition --  
School & Library Binding CDN $14.74  
Hardcover, Aug. 1 1982 --  
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Mass Market Paperback CDN $8.54  
Audio, CD, Audiobook CDN $40.00  
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Book Description

Aug. 1 1982
Outside a peaceful town in central Maine, a monster is waiting. Cujo is a two-hundred-pound Saint Bernard, the best friend Brett Camber has every had. One day Cujo chases a rabbit into a bolt-hole - a cave inhabited by sick bats. What happens to Cujo, how he becomes a horrifying vortex inexorably drawing in all the people around him makes for one of the most heart-stopping novels Stephen King has written.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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From Amazon

Cujo is so well-paced and scary that people tend to read it quickly, so they mostly remember the scene of the mother and son trapped in the hot Pinto and threatened by the rabid Cujo, forgetting the multifaceted story in which that scene is embedded. This is definitely a novel that rewards re-reading. When you read it again, you can pay more attention to the theme of country folk vs. city folk; the parallel marriage conflicts of the Cambers vs. the Trentons; the poignancy of the amiable St. Bernard (yes, the breed choice is just right) infected by a brain-destroying virus that makes it into a monster; and the way the "daylight burial" of the failed ad campaign is reflected in the sunlit Pinto that becomes a coffin. And how significant it is that this horror tale is not supernatural: it's as real as junk food, a failing marriage, a broken-down car, or a fatal virus. --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

Review

The indisputable king of horror Time One of the few horror writers who can truly make the flesh creep Sunday Express Cujo is so well paced and scary that people tend to read it quickly, so they mostly remember the scene of the mother and son trapped in the hot Pinto and threatened by the rabid Cujo, forgetting the multifaceted story in which that scene is embedded. This is definitely a novel that rewards re-reading. When you read it again, you can pay more attention to the theme of country folk versus city folk; the parallel marriage conflicts of the Cambers versus the Trentons; the poignancy of the amiable St Bernard (yes, the breed choice is just right) infected by a brain-destroying virus that makes it into a monster; and the way the "daylight burial" of the failed ad campaign is reflected in the sunlit Pinto that becomes a coffin. And how significant it is that this horror tale is not supernatural: it's as real as junk food, a failing marriage, a broken-down car, or a fatal virus. AMAZON.CO.UK REVIEW --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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First Sentence
ONCE UPON A TIME, not so long ago, a monster came to the small town of Castle Rock, Maine. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Cujo is special. This was my introduction to Stephen King; oh, I'd read that story of his about toy soldiers (in seventh grade English class, no less), but this was my first real Stephen King experience. It was also my first truly adult novel; there's some pretty racy stuff in here, especially when you're an innocent twelve-year-old kid. Steve Kemp, Donna Trenton's jilted lover, is a cretin. That's part of the reason why Cujo has always been my least favorite Stephen King novel - until now, that is. Having finally reread this book, I am quite bowled over by the experience. This is King at his most visceral, his most unrelenting, his most vicious. Dark doesn't begin to describe this novel. The ending was and is controversial (so controversial that it was changed - quite cowardly - in the film adaptation). Speaking of the film, it's important not to judge this novel by that adaptation - in the movie, young Tad is almost impossible to like because Danny Pintauro was just such an annoying child actor, and Cujo himself is little more than a monster because we don't get inside his increasingly disturbed head the way we do in the novel. The real Cujo is a good dog.

King has said he does not remember writing very much of this novel, that it was written in an almost perpetual drunken haze. It's ironic because Cujo is an amazingly sober read. Maybe the booze explains the brutality of the story, but I think not - like any great writer, King lets the story tell itself. What happens at the end of this novel just happens; King doesn't make it happen. That ending - actually, the whole book - opens up all kinds of questions about Fate and justice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Love the Intertwined Stories, Hated The Ending May 5 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Stephen King's CUJO had so much going for it in its first three-quarters, with the ingenious intertwining of its three major story components, that the ending was a complete letdown for me. Here I followed, with such eagerness, the Trentons, the Cambers, and---of course---the most unlucky St. Bernard in the world, Cujo, for over two hundred pages of complex setup, exposition and conflict (across all three components, by the way) only to have it marred and be almost completely undone by an ending that is as mean-spirited as it is simplistic.
Perhaps the ending was inevitable, but in reading some of these reviews which make mention of Stephen King going through a rough period in his life and doing copious amounts of cocaine while writing this book, it's no wonder that the ending was the way it was. I've recently read that this ending was modified for the film version. I still have not yet seen the movie---I know, I know, I'll get to it someday! It received largely negative reviews upon its release in 1983, but if the ending was changed the way I've heard it was, then maybe I'll like it after all!
As it stands, I still enjoyed the first three-quarters of the book, which I read about 10 years ago. My favorite parts actually had nothing whatsoever to do with the titular character; they were the clever cereal saga and the high infidelity drama! Perhaps I should revisit CUJO again soon, if only because most of it is so good. As for the time being, however, I'd have to deem it
MODERATELY RECOMMENDED; AGES 17 & UP
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Centerpiece in Stephen King's career April 8 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Cujo is one of the most memorable and well written novels Stephen King has written to this day. There are fond memories from everybody who has read the book or seen the movie of the Infamous Pinto scene, which stands as one of the most riveting scenes in any novel and the reader just sucks it up like a black hole. Many people read the novel after seeing the movie just to get to the Pinto scene, mostly missing all the carefully laid plot twists and intricate ironies that mask the characters in a macabre shadow. Minor points aside, Cujo stands as Stephen King's most fastpaced and well written novel to date, and therefore should be read by all, and remember, DOGS DO BITE!
Here's a summary of the Story and its Writing:
Story: Enter the Trentons, Donna, the lonely housewife who has just broken off an affair under rather nasty circumstances, Vic, the interminably busy ad maker whos Biggest client is envoloped in a fatal scandal, and Tad, The curious son who's just begun to see monsters in his closet. Then we see the Cambers, Joe, The auto mechanic with an attitude, his wife Charity, Who dreams of a better lifestyle, and their son Brett, the precosious youth who owns a rather large St. Bernard named Cujo. This is where the story really starts to pick up. Cujo in fact is one of the most tame dogs you could have the fortune of having, but after chasing a rabbit into an unforseen hole and being bitten by a cache of bats, Cujo starts to feel different. Cujo was in fact infected with rabies and the disease slowly starts to eat away his mind. The oldest person in town, Evvie Chalmers, predicts that the summer of '82 will be the hottest in 30 years.
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Most recent customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Reflections on a re-read 30 years later
I am (re)reading Stephen King's works in chronological order and this re-read was up next for me. I originally read the book when it was first published in 1981 making me 13yo. Read more
Published 8 months ago by Nicola Mansfield
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing
This was one of my first Stephen King novels that I bought/read.. I have now read it so many times I'm in need of a new copy of the book.. Read more
Published on Feb. 23 2012 by Alissa
5.0 out of 5 stars True King Classic
This book is great! I loved it! The book is better than the movie, more detailed and more things in it to make your imagination run wild!
Published on March 27 2010 by Sarah Lynn Barnim
4.0 out of 5 stars Exciting, but tedious at times
I've enjoyed reading some of King's work, but this is by no means one of his best. Although the premise of the story was good and kept me wondering what was going to happen next,... Read more
Published on May 28 2004 by J. Naft
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Book
Good Book. You don't even realise it's a long book, it moves fast.
Published on May 16 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favorites from King....
This is one of my favorite novels from King. The plot is pure genius...a gentle, loving family dog that gets rabies from some bats...then unwillingly turns into a savage monster. Read more
Published on April 5 2004 by Lavelle Jackson
4.0 out of 5 stars Is Cujo the sequel to The Dead Zone?
it just could be. in the dead zone there was a castle rock serial killer named frank dodd, and in the course of in the book he meets his demise. Read more
Published on Feb. 6 2004 by ghostmann
5.0 out of 5 stars King Is Still King
"Cujo" IS a gripping and compelling novel which pulls the reader in by leaving open ends thoughout the entire experience. This book is great from start to finish. Read more
Published on Jan. 30 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars Is Cujo the sequel to The Dead Zone?
it just could be. in the dead zone there was a castle rock serial killer named frank dodd, and in the course of in the book he meets his demise. Read more
Published on Jan. 29 2004 by ghostmann
4.0 out of 5 stars The Cujo Review (very original)
"Except that the monster never dies. Werewolf, vampire, ghoul, unnamable creature from the wastes. The monster never dies. Read more
Published on Oct. 9 2003 by David Castleberry
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