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Cult: A Novel of Brainwashing and Death Hardcover – Oct 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 227 pages
  • Publisher: Stonehouse Pr (October 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0971704902
  • ISBN-13: 978-0971704909
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 14 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 476 g
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Product Description

From Library Journal

In this frighteningly timely novel, Adler attempts to show how easily people can be drawn into a cult, brainwashed by a charismatic leader, and programmed to do almost anything including committing suicide. Barney Harrigan'a young wife has left him for the Glories, a mysterious group approved by the IRS as a religion. In desperation, he turns to a former lover, a human rights activist with political connections, and to a deprogrammer who was once a Glories member. Barney uses his four-year-old son as a pawn, but his plan to bargain for his wife goes tragically awry in a deadly struggle with Jeremiah, the cult's leader. Adler (War of the Roses) has published 22 novels, two of which have been filmed, and enthusiastically promotes the electronic publishing of his works. This book won't win many new readers in any format, however. It's a thinly disguised polemic on the dangers of cults, with flat characters, awful dialog, and a wishy-washy heroine who vacillates about her principles. Not recommended. Roland Person, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Warren Adler’s twenty-five published novels have won popular and critical success all over the world, and they have been translated into more than thirty languages. Two of his books were made into major motion pictures, the classic “The War of the Roses” with Michael Douglas and “Random Hearts” with Harrison Ford. Three of his acclaimed short stories were adapted as a three-hour trilogy on PBS's American Playhouse titled, “The Sunset Gang.” Mr. Adler’s themes deal primarily with intimate human relationships – the mysterious nature of love and attraction, the fragile relationships between husbands and wives and parents and children, and the corrupting power of money. Readers and reviewers have cited his books for their insight and wisdom in presenting and deciphering the complexities of contemporary life. Warren Adler is arguably the only author in the world, published by major publishing houses, who has reacquired the English language and foreign rights to his entire backlist of 25 novels and set up a publishing company, Stonehouse Press, designed to distribute his backlist worldwide in all formats. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most helpful customer reviews

By A Customer on Nov. 16 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is quite possibly the worst novel ever written.
Cliche after cliche has you cringing.
Shoddy, pop psyschology characterization.
Discursive plot.
Clumsy sentences, just awful.
And as the forward suggests, a transparently dumb attempt to
link a bad idea with a 9/11 marketing notion.
Too bad, because it's a subject that a good novelist might make
really interesting.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Deserves NO STARS! Nov. 16 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is quite possibly the worst novel ever written.
Cliche after cliche has you cringing.
Shoddy, pop psyschology characterization.
Discursive plot.
Clumsy sentences, just awful.
And as the forward suggests, a transparently dumb attempt to
link a bad idea with a 9/11 marketing notion.
Too bad, because it's a subject that a good novelist might make
really interesting.

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