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Cult Camp Classics, Vol. 2: Women in Peril (The Big Cube / Caged / Trog)


Price: CDN$ 52.67 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Cult Camp Classics, Vol. 2: Women in Peril (The Big Cube / Caged / Trog) + Cult Camp Classics: Vol. 4: Historical Epics
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Product Details

  • Actors: Eleanor Parker, Agnes Moorehead, Ellen Corby, Hope Emerson, Betty Garde
  • Directors: Freddie Francis, John Cromwell, Tito Davison
  • Writers: Aben Kandel, Bernard C. Schoenfeld, Edmundo Báez, John Gilling, Peter Bryan
  • Format: Anamorphic, Dolby, Dubbed, Full Screen, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Warner
  • Release Date: June 26 2007
  • Run Time: 285 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000OHZJGY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #31,332 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: DVD
Joe Cornelius, who played in such films as "File of the Golden Goose" (Gordie) with Yul Brynner, was selected to upstage Joan Crawford as that multi dimensional character (Trog).

You have seen this story a million times. Innocent cave creature is tormented by child let lose on it by sadistic anthropologist. The poor creature must "play ball" or pay the consequences.

Can't wait for the sequel where they have Joe Cornelius Vs the Piltdown man with William Shatner.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Simon Davis on May 17 2004
Format: VHS Tape
"Trog", the last film in the illustrous career of film legend Joan Crawford has gone done into cinematic history as one of the biggest and most embarrassing "monster", movies ever to be conceived. Joan Crawford of course nowadays is sadly fair game for any type of attack and "Trog", is a favourite target by her many detractors. Harsh summaries of it run to the fact that Crawford was supposedly drunk all the way through production, that it had one of the lowest budgets of any horror film made in England and that it made Crawford totally unemployable after its release thus becoming the sad final note in a brilliant career. Certainly no masterpiece, "Trog", despite some laughable moments is far from the worst horror film ever made and for Joan Crawford's as always totally committed performance despite the material she has to work with, alone is worth seeing. It marked the second time in two years that movie offers from producer Herman Cohen had brought Joan Crawford to England for filming, (Berserk! in 1968 being the other), and she fitted in excellently with the often gifted British performers, like Michael Gough, Diana Dors and Robert Hardy who supported her in these productions. Despite comments to the contrary Joan Crawford is well and truly in control of her character in this little horror effort and certainly makes "Trog", far more entertaining viewing than it probably deserves to be considering its budget.
Crawford plays Anthropologist Dr. Brockton who works at a rural research centre in England and is involved in the study of early man's development from the Apes. While hiking in the neighbouring moors some local students discover a fisher has opened up and they climb down to investigate the caverns below.
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By J. D. Schmidt on Oct. 18 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Well, after seeing Joan Crawford ham in up to the max in "Strait Jacket" I knew "Trog" was going to be my next movie purchase. The movie never quite lives up to it's promise as a classic in the "time-honored horror tradition". Ms. Crawford takes the role way too seriously (which is exactly why it's fun to watch). Still too much of the movie is spent watching Trog try to adapt to the outside world for the first time. This lead to a few painful scenes where Joan plays catch with Trog and even goes as far as to bring out her doll collection for Trog's amusement (what exactly Trog is suppose to get out of that, I can only guess...). These sequences reminded me of a poorly done "Nell". Do we really want to watch Trog adapt to his new surrounding and make friends with everbody. Of course not! We want Trog to run amok and wreck havoc on the town. It's not until the very end of the movie that this actually happens. Joan is there to save the day, but it's a bittersweet victory. The town is safe once again, but what about Trog? You can feel Joan's pain (especially when you stop and consider that this jem was her last film).
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rod Labbe on July 13 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Whatever possessed the great Joan Crawford, Oscar-winner, to end her cinematic career with "Trog?" That question boggles the mind! Perhaps she was loaded on 100 proof vodka...at least that would somewhat explain her reasoning for contributing to this god-awful "horror" film. Trog is a cheapjack production all the way, rife with low-brow acting, garish special effects, an overbearing and brassy musical score, and a truly odorous performance by Joe Cornelius as the missing link, affectionately knick-named "Trog." Is there a plot? Well, I guess so. Are there dramatics? Sure. Joanie shouts and barks orders in a liquor-induced fog! Is there gore? Unfortunately, yes--involving a meat hook, of all things. Can you imagine someone hanging from a meat hook in a Joan Crawford picture? Oh, how the mighty have fallen! One reviewer mentioned Bette Davis and "Wicked Stepmother," but Bette still had sense (even after multiple strokes) to bale out before the film concluded. Joan, who was much younger than Davis when she made Trog, showed no such cinematic sense. I'd recommend "Trog" only if you want a laugh. And if you want to see Crawford in a decent horror film, watch "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane." It's the only good one she ever made! The others were trash, including "Berserk" and "Trog." Ugh, just thinking about it makes me nauseous!
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