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Product Details

  • Paperback: 100 pages
  • Publisher: Melville House (July 8 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933633522
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933633527
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 12.3 x 17 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 91 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,158,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Amazon.com: 1 review
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A Sept. 11 2008
By Lauren Magnussen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Duteurtre's seemingly simple treatise on the negative effects of technology in today's world slowly reveals its layers in small increments. The unnamed protagonist lets loose his frustrations on the encroaching field of electronics with skillful comparisons of old-world ideas juxtaposed with modern innovations. His angers and concerns absolutely echo the sentiments that many people feel today in an age of fast-paced living. The second half of the novella slides eerily into surrealism, with the character of Leslie Delmare seemingly representing the narrator's conscience, with a personality that both intrigues and clashes with his own. A present-day 1984, this glimpse into a world just like ours, yet slightly off-kilter, shows us our future if we don't slow down. Not quite dystopian, yet not quite real life, Duteurtre's metaphors serve as a testament that will allow later generations to see how society dove into the technology craze with gusto, and not enough caution.


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