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DIVINE SECRETS OF THE YA-YA SISTERHOOD Paperback – May 7 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: MACMILLAN (May 7 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0333763777
  • ISBN-13: 978-0333763773
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.2 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,145 customer reviews)


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Tap-dancing child abuser. Read the first page
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By oneworldview on March 14 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an amazing book. The premise, the writing itself, the characters... all in all a very good read, I would recommend it, and I am going to read a few more books written by this author.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10 2002
Format: Paperback
I saw the movie before reading the book and felt that the movie was lacking somthing, so I picked up the book.
Mind you,I have a pile 10 books high of Oprah books I keep meaning to read, but with 4 wild kids, it just never seems to happen.
This book happened--it pulled me in immediately.
Not only did it touch nerves regarding my own feeelings about my mother, but it made me think of my own feelings AS a mother.
I wondered if I was screwed up, or if I was doing the screwing up part to MY kids,lol.
Sometimes, when all that can be seen is "the relationship" with one's parent/children- it is hard to tell, but by the end of the book one comes to terms with it all to some degree, an acceptance that basically "life is short, but it is wide."

What an iteresting book ,not just the stories of Sidda and Vivi, but the story it makes the reader remember of her own memories and childhood. The stories the reader sees her children remembering one day.
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By Jamieson Villeneuve TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Dec 7 2008
Format: Paperback
When secrets have been buried beneath the veneer of the skin, they fester. Sometimes, those secrets can be held at bay for years, decades even. Sometimes the secrets you hold can eat away at who you are, and what you have become. Usually, they have to come out sooner or later.

The consequences of that release, letting the secrets breathe and have life once more, can be good or bad - but keeping those secrets inside can tear a family apart.

In the incredible book "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" by Rebecca Wells, we meet Siddalee Walker, a middle aged playwright directing her first Broadway play. She is the daughter of Southern Belle Vivi Abbot Walker. Their relationship is rocky at best.

Along for the ride are Vivi's life long friends: Necie, Caro and Teensy. Decades ago, Vivi, Necie, Caro and Teensie formed a secret sisterhood, the sisterhood of the Ya-Ya's. They will let no man put them under, and will always listen to the call of the women and Gods that came before them.

Their friendship, forged in the heat of the South and the blood they shared, has stood the test of time. Unfortunately, Vivi's relationships with her children, especially Sidda, haven't.When the New York Times interviews Sidda and proclaims her mother to be a tap dancing child abuser, all hell breaks loose. Vivi cuts Siddalee out of her will and proclaims her dead to her, in true Southern fashion.

At a loss as to how to articulate her pain, Sidda decides not to marry her seven-year sweetheart Connor McGill. The Ya-Ya's step in to Sidda's aid. They implore Vivi to send Sidda the Divine Secrets, a scrapbook of sorts that chronicles their lives together.
Read more ›
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By Kenny G. on Nov. 27 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a book for anyone who is a mother and anyone who is a daughter.

It's about insight and perspective, love and forgiveness, and ultimately, about the redemptive (life-giving) nature of the relationships between mother and daughter and women friends.

Even if we didn't have it as bad as Vivi or SiddaLee, most off us mothers have screwed up and hurt our kids without meaning to, and many of us know what it feels like to have a mother whose own pain sometimes gets in the way of her ability to be a "good" mother.

What Wells has given us is a poignant, sometimes painful, sometimes humorous portrait of the journey between the way it is between Vivi and SiddaLee and the way they want it to be.

This is also a book about friendship, about continuity over time, and the truth of women's lives. It's about friends who share joy, responsibility and their shame with each other. I loved every moment of reading this book. You will too.

If you loved this book, along with the SHOPAHOLIC SERIES and the book THE WOMAN WHO CUT OFF HER LEG, then you'll have one great collection.
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By A Customer on July 3 2004
Format: Paperback
For me, books dealing with the South are like pizza and sex---even when they're bad they're still pretty good. That's not to say that "Divine Secrets" is bad, it isn't. In fact, I thoroughly enjoyed it. As a matter of fact, it's one of the two best books I've read recently that dealt with family sagas, secrets, the south, and a host of other things. The other is a book called "The Bark of the Dogwood--A Tour of Southern Homes and Gardens." Both books are entertaining and well-written. But I digress. My point is that books dealing with southern themes and ideas, well . . .you can't go wrong. Why is it that all the great writers are Southern? Who knows. And I don't care. All I do know is that "Divine Secrets" is a rollicking good time with more than a few dark undertones. This one's a keeper.
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By A Customer on June 22 2004
Format: Paperback
I gave this book one star because Wells does have some writing talent. However, her subject matter is somewhat nauseating. A mother and daughter who are on the "outs" because the daughter reveals that Mama was mean to her when she was a kid? That's not exactly a plot that can fill a whole book, but Wells thinks it can. The females in this book are, for the most part, very believable. The male characters are flawless & saintly, female fantasies of what men should be, except without the personality. If she developed male characters as well as she developed female characters, it would make it a lot more interesting. In some places she gets nauseatingly sentimental - it makes me want to take a bath, or go watch "Law and Order" to get back to reality. She goes over little things over and over and over ad nauseam. I would have preferred to read this tale in short-story form, where Mom says "Sorry, kid. I was a bad Mom. I had a rough life. Didn't mean to hurt you." Then the daughter says "OK, Mom." Hug. THE END. I'm not a really huge fan of most "chick flicks" or "chick books" (except maybe Jane Austen stuff), because they lack literary testosterone. But this was the ookiest, sweetsy-est, touchy-feeliest chick book I've ever touched. Yechhh! Oh yeah, and I AM a woman. Rebecca, you have some talent. Next time, please write a real STORY.
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