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DRAKAS! [Mass Market Paperback]

S.M. STIRLING
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 7.63 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Book Description

Nov. 1 2000
THINK ABOUT HISTORY. NOW MAKE IT WORSE...

The Domination of the Draka begins as a British possession in Africa, but soon becomes far more. Absorbing refugees after the American Revolution, and later the Civil War, the Draka become a people bred to rule with an iron fist. They permanently enslave the peoples of Africa, when they do not simply kill them.
But this does not slake the Draka thirst for power. Sweeping across the world, the Draka empire engulfs nation after nation, shackling into servitude all who are not Draka. Europe, Asia, and finally all the Earth and its colonies throughout the Solar System fall before the might of the Draka.
But empires are not faceless monoliths; they are made of individuals, complex humans with their own hopes and dreams. And so one might ask: Who are the Draka? What sort of people does the Domination rule? The Draka would have many different answers...
...and this is their story.

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4.0 out of 5 stars From the Past to the Future May 23 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Drakas!" is a collection of short stories written by multiple alternative history authors concerning S.M. Stirling's alternative timeline of the Drakas. The Drakas were founded when the Loyalists left America after the American Revolution and went to South Africa instead of Canada as they did in our time line. Along the way, they were joined by some of the Confederates after the Civil War. Eventually, they conquered Africa and created a super state. Then they set their site on the rest of the world. A couple key features of Draka society inlcude the advancement of a super race, which includes genetic engineering, and the enslavement of all others.
In "Drakas!," several authors take their turn telling stories in S.M. Stirling's world. Stirling has arranged these stories in chronological order, starting with stories that take place shortly after the American Civil War. The first story concerns Custer and is written by William Sanders. The story features an additional twist in which Custer chose not to attack the Indians at Little Big Horn and goes on to meet his fate in the Draka Domination.
My favorite alternative history author, Harry Turtledove, wrote a compelling story for the collection. His story is set in the modern era where the Draka finally turn their attention to the United States after conquering the rest of the world. In my opinion, Turtledove's story ranks as one of the better stories in the collection and it offers humanity its best hope in the Draka timeline. Another established and well known alternative history author, David Drake, writes a particularly gruesome story of a much worse World War II, which is not for the faint of heart.
An author I am not familiar with by the name of Roland Green wrote a compelling story.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Think about history. Now make it worse... Jan. 3 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Drakas" happened to be my first introduction to the story of the Draka, and although I'd recommend reading the trilogy first ("Marching through Georgia", "Under the yoke" and "The stone dogs") I immediately became fascinated by the idea of how a "nation of loosers", as the young Eric von Shrakenberg (main character of the trilogy) so nicely puts it, became rulers of the world.
For the Dominaton of Draka was a nation built by loosers. First the loosers of the American revolutionary war, who were given a new start in South Africa, and later royalists who fled revolutionary France, loosers of the American civil war, misunderstood and unappreciated philosophers and artists of Europe (like F. Nietsche and O. Wilde) etc.
This book broadens the picture, gives a few new faces to the Draka. We hear the story of a broken General Custer, branded a coward for retreating at Little Big Horn- a looser of the American west become Draka. We witness the horrors of an alternate WWII, a WORSE WWII... We hear the dying words of an American partisan, in the aftermath of a nuclear holocaust.
There are some very good stories here. If I should mention one drawback, I have to agree with other reviewers and say it has to be the stories set in the future. The problem with these is that instead of being able to compare Draka world to our world, with all the small likenesses and differences, you lose the familiarity with the world described. While one can discuss wether a society like the Domination of Draka could have sustained itself, and shake your head at their twisted views and practices, the futuristic stories move too far from our world to really be interesting in that sense. Still, the first three quarters of the book are so good, I will give it 4 stars out of 5, and a recommendation for anyone with the imagination and open- mindedness to hear a story of what could have been. And luckily didn't...
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4.0 out of 5 stars Hope Springs Eternal May 2 2002
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I read the entire Draka canon over a weekend, having not heard of it before. Dark and compelling is the world S.M. Stirling has fashioned here. But Drakon adds a bit of potential light, and the stories in Drakas! add more little glints of possibly better--or at least nobler--outcomes. As a bit of a romantic, I like that a lot. While all the stories were good, I differ with other reviewers in one respect--Harry Turtledove, my first and last love in alternative history, just can't bring himself to embrace the slimy, smarmy, repellently compelling, seductively disgusting feel of a Draka-dominated solar system. He is best in his own imaginative domains, at least to me. But Drakas is a great tonic to "The Domination" (the collected first three novels in the series), which I think is probably an orgasmic experience for poor white trash Ku Klux Klan loser thug types who thought Heinlein's early novel Farnham's Freehold was his best work (if you haven't read it, a novel that give "the other white meat" a whole new meaning). Having said that, will I keep reading Draka novels and anthologies? You bet. I'm as sick as the next SF fan.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Draka are Back Nov. 9 2000
Format:Mass Market Paperback
For those of us who have been anxiously waiting for a new Draka novel since _Drakon_ came out in 1996, this short story anthology is the next best thing.
Featuring works by such speculative fiction luminaries as David Drake, Harry Turtledove, John Barnes, Jane Lindskold, and others, the anthology revisits one of the most intriguing, fascinating, and terrifying alternate realities ever created.
The stories are all of good quality, and cover a wide time spectrum. I particulary liked the stories by Lindskold (who shows us another side of Eric von Shrakenberg) and Turtledove (who gives the Alliance for Democracy just a bit of hope).
The anthology is best read after reading the four Draka novels, much of it will make little sense to those not familiar with them.
The only things that prevented me from awarding five stars instead of four were some minor continuity problems with the Draka novels in a couple of the stories, and the absence of a new story by Stirling himself. But these are just minor concerns.
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Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars A good collection
I enjoyed some of the stories better than others in this collection, but I suppose that is to be expected. Read more
Published on June 7 2004 by Gunfighter
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but no soul...
Although the individual tales of 'Drakas!' had potential, they simply weren't long enough to let us become familiar with the characters and plots, and how much we truly love to... Read more
Published on June 21 2003 by Eric Harkness
3.0 out of 5 stars The fruit of idle curiosity
As much as I was entranced by the Domination (see my review for that book), Drakas! failed to satisfy my hunger for new Draka-reality stories. Read more
Published on Nov. 12 2002 by Mark M. Fox
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly Good
I had really given up on finding any new Draka material, so you can imagine my delight in finding this book tucked away in a back corner of a mall bookstore. Read more
Published on Jan. 1 2001 by Michael
4.0 out of 5 stars a very pleasant surprise
The original Draka books are in my opinion the best alternate history ever written, and I thus opened this volume of shared-world short stories with some anxiety; this sort of... Read more
Published on Nov. 3 2000 by Fredric Smoler
4.0 out of 5 stars a very pleasant surprise
The original Draka books are in my opinion the best alternate history ever written, and I thus opened this volume of shared-world short stories with some anxiety; this sort of... Read more
Published on Nov. 3 2000 by Fredric Smoler
4.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding shared-world anthology
S. M. Stirling's Draka are one of alternate history's more memorable creations. Bloodchillingly nasty and utterly efficient, they are seen by all as either the most terrifying or... Read more
Published on Oct. 31 2000 by Jeph Gord
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