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Dance Hall Of The Dead Mm Mass Market Paperback – Mar 15 1990


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 242 pages
  • Publisher: Harper; Reprint edition (March 15 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061000027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061000027
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 1.9 x 17 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,728,977 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"...as with all of Hillerman's other books on tape, Dance Hall of the Dead is compelling, colorful, and just complex enough to keep you interested, but not confused." -- Catalyst, September 1997

"An author's style has a lot to do with the success of an audio book...One writer whose works on the mark for listeners every time is Tony Hillerman...Hillerman is a former newspaper reporter, and his novels have a journalistic feel. His sentences tend to be straightforward, and they translate well to tape...An editor for Recorded Books said Hillerman's books are "very crisply written, and he leaves a lot to the imagination. Some writers put in too much detail. He leaves a lot of room for the listener."...Actor Michael Ansara, who has portrayed native Americans on television and in films, is the reader for Audio Partners' work. His reading is crisp and clear, with a touch of gravity." -- Indianapolis Star, September 1991

"High entertainment, an aesthetically satisfying glimpse of the still-powerful tribal mysteries." -- The New York Times --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

About the Author

Tony Hillerman is a former president of the Mystery Writers of America and has received its Edgar® and Grand Master awards. His other honors include the LA Times Robert Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement, the Center for the American Indian’s Ambassador Award, the Silver Spur Award for the best novel set in the West, and the Navajo Tribe’s Special Friend Award. He lives with his wife in Albuquerque, New Mexico.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
SHULAWITSI, the Little Fire God, member of the Council of the God's and Deputy to the Sun, had taped his track shoes to his feet. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on Nov. 10 2006
Format: Hardcover
Twelve-year-old Ernesto Cata (Zu'i) is practicing to be the Fire God in a local ceremony. His best buddy George Bowlegs (Navaho) is a Zu'i wana-be.

Ernesto is missing and there is a pool of blood by his bike. The next day his buddy George runs off. It is up to Sgt. Joe Leaphorn to find the boys before anything happens to them (if it has not already.)

As with most of Hillerman's novels everyone has different agendas and stories that overlap. There are alleged stolen artifacts form and archeological dig, and possibly a drug interest. They may or may not interact. We also get a good dose of Zu'i culture, and a feel that we are in the area.

Hillerman is nice enough to leave sufficient clues to let you figure out the mystery before Leaphorn and you then get to watch as he finally comes around to your way of thinking.

Another book by Hillerman "The Boy who Made Dragonfly" further describes the dance hall of the dead (Kothluwalawa.)

Author's Note:

"In this book, the setting is genuine. The village of Zu'i and the landscape of the Zu'i reservation are depicted to the best of my ability. The characters are purely fictional. The view the reader receives of the Sha'lak'o religion is as it might be seen by a Navajo with an interest in ethnology. It does not pretend to be more than that."
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By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 23 2006
Format: Paperback
Twelve-year-old Ernesto Cata (Zu'i) is practicing to be the Fire God in a local ceremony. His best buddy George Bowlegs (Navaho) is a Zu'i wana-be.

Ernesto is missing and there is a pool of blood by his bike. The next day his buddy George runs off. It is up to Sgt. Joe Leaphorn to find the boys before anything happens to them (if it has not already.)

As with most of Hillerman's novels everyone has different agendas and stories that overlap. There are alleged stolen artifacts form and archeological dig, and possibly a drug interest. They may or may not interact. We also get a good dose of Zu'i culture, and a feel that we are in the area.

Hillerman is nice enough to leave sufficient clues to let you figure out the mystery before Leaphorn and you then get to watch as he finally comes around to your way of thinking.

Another book by Hillerman "The Boy who Made Dragonfly" further describes the dance hall of the dead (Kothluwalawa.)

Author's Note:

"In this book, the setting is genuine. The village of Zu'i and the landscape of the Zu'i reservation are depicted to the best of my ability. The characters are purely fictional. The view the reader receives of the Sha'lak'o religion is as it might be seen by a Navajo with an interest in ethnology. It does not pretend to be more than that."
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 9 2006
Format: Audio Cassette
Twelve-year-old Ernesto Cata (Zu'i) is practicing to be the Fire God in a local ceremony. His best buddy George Bowlegs (Navaho) is a Zu'i wana-be.

Ernesto is missing and there is a pool of blood by his bike. The next day his buddy George runs off. It is up to Sgt. Joe Leaphorn to find the boys before anything happens to them (if it has not already.)

As with most of Hillerman's novels everyone has different agendas and stories that overlap. There are alleged stolen artifacts form and archeological dig, and possibly a drug interest. They may or may not interact. We also get a good dose of Zu'i culture, and a feel that we are in the area.

Hillerman is nice enough to leave sufficient clues to let you figure out the mystery before Leaphorn and you then get to watch as he finally comes around to your way of thinking.

Another book by Hillerman "The Boy who Made Dragonfly" further describes the dance hall of the dead (Kothluwalawa.)

Author's Note:

"In this book, the setting is genuine. The village of Zu'i and the landscape of the Zu'i reservation are depicted to the best of my ability. The characters are purely fictional. The view the reader receives of the Sha'lak'o religion is as it might be seen by a Navajo with an interest in ethnology. It does not pretend to be more than that."
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the second book in the "Navajo Detective" series by Tony Hillerman and the first in which detective Joe Leaphorn is the principal charactor.
Dance Hall of the Dead is a sad story. It concerns the murder or disppearance of two boys, a Navajo and a Zuni, and Joe Leaphorn's efforts to find the missing boys. The riddle is entwined with Zuni religious ceremonies which Leaphorn, a Navajo, tries to understand.
Hillerman gives a virtual travelogue of the Zuni and Navajo country of New Mexico and Arizona in the early 1970s when the book was written. Leaphorn is a thoroughly likeable hero, rational, even-tempered, and ethical with a compulsion to get to the bottom of things. Hillerman is a master of creating an exotic atmosphere of Zuni and Navajo culture and ceremonies overlaid by the splendor of the natural setting. With such ornament, it hardly matters that the solution to the mystery itself is not very convincing.
What a great title! If you're a wide-open-spaces-kind-of-a-person Hillerman is unbeatable as a mystery writer with a western twist. In Joe Leaphorn he has created a fictional detective who can take his place among the all-time best.
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