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A Dangerous Method (Blu-Ray/DVD Combo) / Une méthode dangereuse (Blu-ray/DVD Combo) (Bilingual)


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A Dangerous Method (Blu-Ray/DVD Combo) / Une méthode dangereuse (Blu-ray/DVD Combo)  (Bilingual) + Cosmopolis (Blu-ray + DVD) (Bilingual)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Keira Knightley, Viggo Mortensen, Michael Fassbender, Vincent Cassel
  • Directors: David Cronenberg
  • Writers: Christopher Hampton, John Kerr
  • Format: DVD + Blu-ray, NTSC, Dolby, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Studio: eOne Films
  • Release Date: March 27 2012
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0072DNEAQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,654 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

Seduced by the challenge of an impossible case, the driven Dr. Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender) takes the unbalanced yet beautiful Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley) as his patient in A Dangerous Method. Jung's weapon is the method of his master, the renowned Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen). Both men fall under Sabina's spell.

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Une jeune femme soignée par le psychanalyste Carl Jung devient sa maîtresse.

Amazon.ca

With a lucid analyst's eye, director David Cronenberg turns his steady gaze toward a trio of brilliant people in the early, and somehow defining, years of the 20th century. In Zurich, a young psychoanalyst named Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender) takes on an intellectually gifted but deeply neurotic young woman, Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), as a patient. Through the course of a lengthy analysis, their relationship takes a turn for intimacy, despite professional policy against such encounters. Meanwhile, Jung is entwined in another important relationship, with psychoanalysis founder Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen), whose enthusiasm about Jung being the golden boy of the science will eventually dim. What's bracing in Cronenberg's keen reading of this situation, based on Christopher Hampton's script, is that no aspect of this situation is more important than any other; the sexual tumbling between Jung and Spielrein might provide a few hotsy moments, but the careful lines traced between Freud's pragmatic wisdom and Jung's idealistic ventures into the mystic are equally significant. The tenor of the acting is similarly well judged; Fassbender and Mortensen are finely drawn, while Knightley's explosions are necessary for uncomfortable contrast. (Vincent Cassel contributes a few memorable scenes as the rule-breaking Otto Gross, a talented but unbalanced analyst himself.) If you go to movies to turn your brain off, go somewhere else; there are enough ideas loose in this superb film to keep you up at night, in a good way. --Robert Horton

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By delia ruhe on May 17 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film is beautiful to look at '-- costumes, settings, props all exquisitely presented. And the acting by all three principles is superb. For me, these are sufficient reasons to see the film. But if you know anything about psychoanalysis (Freud) and/or analytical psychology (Jung), you might find yourself rather bored. I did. I wasn''t expecting a perfectly accurate historical take -- nor did the film present one -- but I was expecting the focus to be on Freud and Jung''s relationship. Instead, this is a film about the relationship between Jung and Spielrein with the character of Freud in a fairly modest supporting role.

Sabina Spielrein comes to Dr Jung at the Bergholzei in Switzerland suffering from a violent case of what used to be called '"hysteria."' But instead of a reasonably explanatory presentation of how the 'talking cure' helps her recover, we get a (thoroughly fictional) sexual affair between Spielrein and Jung in which he turns her on by spanking her. Perhaps that was supposed to illustrate how '"dangerous"' the talking-cure method can be? If that is the case, it should be pointed out that virtually all methods of psychotherapy are potentially dangerous in this way, since they virtually all lend themselves to transference-countertransference events of varying intensities.

But since we already know that Cronenberg favours Freudian over Jungian theory, I rather think that the sexual affair is supposed to suggest that the Freudian position that sexual disturbance is at the root of every neurosis and psychosis is essentially correct, as distinct from Jung''s much more expansive view of libidinal vitality.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gary Fuhrman TOP 50 REVIEWER on March 28 2012
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This film is a kind of triple biopic, recreating a crucial period in the lives of psychoanalytic pioneers Freud, Jung and Sabina Spielrein in a manner that shows great respect for historical accuracy. But the interplay between the three, as played by Mortenson, Fassbender and Knightley, is so riveting that it comes across as a subtle and moving psychological masterpiece, not a museum piece.

I came to it having read a bit of Freud and a bit more of Jung, and was vaguely acquainted with their points of disagreement, but i was completely unprepared for the revelation of how their respective theories were shaped by their relationships, especially by Jung's relationship with Spielrein. Christopher Hampton's concise script and Cronenberg's impeccable direction create a vivid space in which the three leads, along with Sarah Gadon as Jung's wife and Vincent Cassel as Otto Gross, become living personalities grappling with challenges that are no less real today. It all looks beautiful on blu-ray, too! The result is a hugely entertaining film, and one you'll want to see again, just to witness (and maybe share in) the titanic struggles of soul that both Spielrein and Jung went through.

I've loved Cronenberg's more far-out creations such as Videodrome, The Fly, and Naked Lunch, but i'd have to say this is his best work yet. There's not much in the way of extras on this disk, but the edited interviews with him and the actors show how he's honed his art to the point that he's in complete control but also has complete trust in his actors. This is the perfect story for that kind of technique, as it creates just the right atmosphere for the whole film -- in a way, it's all about the psychological ambiguities and ambivalences of control (including self-control). A flawless work of art about people with fascinating flaws.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 23 2014
Format: DVD
"A Dangerous Method" is a movie that disserved by its trailer -- it looked like a movie that focused on Carl Jung having an affair with a masochistic mental patient. Well, yes, that does happen. But David Cronenberg's movie is less about the love affair and more about Carl Jung's fraying friendship with Sigmund Freud, and Viggo Mortensen and Michael Fassbender give exquisite performances. Sadly, Keira Knightley isn't up to their level.

Sabina Spielrein (Knightley) is incarcerated at a Swiss mental hospital, where she is psychoanalyzed by Carl Jung (Fassbender) -- and soon he is able to pinpoint the cause of her masochistic sexual behavior. Soon she's not only acting normally, but is studying to become a doctor herself.

Pleased by her progress, Jung speaks about her to the eminent Dr. Sigmund Freud (Mortensen), who views Jung as a surrogate son and heir to his well-regarded theories. At the same time, Jung continues working professionally with Sabina as she develops her own psychoanalytic theories -- and the two of them develop a passionate attraction.

Jung initially is reluctant to cheat on his loyal, beautiful wife. But after a sex-addicted psychoanalyst (Vincent Cassel) exhorts Jung to follow his urges, he falls into a passionate affair with Sabina. This throws a monkey wrench not only into his personal life, but it begins to interfere in his friendship with Freud -- and as Jung insists on following his own theories about myth and archetypes, his friendship with Freud begins to fall apart.

It takes a director as brilliant as David Cronenberg to not only get a movie like this made and released in theatres, but to keep it from becoming dull.
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