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Danse Macabre Paperback – 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group (2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841493198
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841493190
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 3.2 x 17.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,158,110 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on July 3 2006
Format: Hardcover
"Danse Macabre" is the fourteenth Anita Blake novel from Laurell K. Hamilton (counting her "Micah" novella as the thirteenth outing) and opens with a hell of a hook: Anita's period is two weeks overdue and she is starting to freak out. If she is pregnant then the burning question of who is the father, which is immediately tied to "what" is the father. However, Anita does not have time to pick up a pregnancy test let alone take the test because Jean-Claude is throwing a big bash to welcome to St. Louis the first ever mostly-vampire dance company. He is one of the group's patrons and is throwing the party to help the group earn rave reviews. Several Masters of the City will be visiting and a couple of them have shown up early and there will be a preliminary event. But when Anita shows up at Circus of the Damned, Jean-Claude and Asher are off dealing with Meng Die, who has gone off of the deep end. This leaves the Executioner to host the visiting Masters and their entourages on her own. That is when things start getting bad, because Master vampires are prone to think they are superior to a mere human servant, but Anita Blake got past that line on her resume a long, long time ago.

I was encouraged when I started reading "Danse Macabre," not because of all of the possible complications a pregnancy would create for our heroine, but because a gathering of Masters of the City is fraught with even more potential for disasters. The first two Masters to show up cause major problems and they are supposedly friends of Jean-Claude. Word is getting around of what has been happening in St. Louis and there are those who think the way Jean-Claude is running things is a sign of weakness.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S. Campbell on Aug. 9 2006
Format: Hardcover
Other reviews here have gone into detail with some enthusiasm about the plot (or lack thereof), so I won't address it here. The author has some worthwhile insights into her society and, to her credit, has developed a supernatural culture that is of some interest. The culture appears to be based solely on the sensual, primarily sex. Like an x-rated movie, the entire purpose of the book appears to be to set up situations where the "heroine" can have sex with her many partners, and in my opinion, that makes this book porn. Soft-core porn, but porn nonetheless.

Ms. Hamilton explores her supernatural from an insider's view, and the point of view can allow for some interesting situations. Her characters are distinct, though you can't help feeling that the purpose of the book is to work out the author's own sexual fantasies with the main character as her avatar. I found the author's prose pedantic, and thought that it only lifts above the coarse when the author addresses her favorite topic, intercourse.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By T. Gregoire on July 10 2006
Format: Hardcover
I remember when the Anita Blake books used to have a plot. This one, however, does not. It is mostly about sex, with her current partners, as well as some new ones. Hamilton is bordering on Erotica here, and if this is how she's going to continue to write, she may as well join the genre properly. I love the Anita Blake character, and found this book very disapointing. Although I am not quite ready to give up hope, and I am ready to stop buying these books in hardcover. I have no desire to own a book that I will never, ever read again.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Writing a bestselling series seems to be a sign of creative doom, because sooner or later the author starts writing for the sake of the series, not because it actually takes the story anywhere.

Sadly this is the case in the latest moribund volume of the Anita Blake series, "Danse Macabre." The entire plotless, meandering mess seems to have been written for two reasons: money, and to blow a big raspberry at Laurell K. Hamilton's readers. Given the only real plot development is a pregnancy scare, it doesn't seem worth it.

Anita has a new dilemma -- she might be pregnant, which isn't surprising for a woman who has spent the last few books being shagged left, right and every way to Sunday by every vamp, human and lycanthrope imaginable. What's more, many powerful vampires are arriving in St. Louis, including a vampiric ballet troupe in Jean-Claude's territory.

As if this weren't bad enough, the ardeur seems to be showing signs of seeking out new sex partners for her, and is affecting her lovers as well -- and her lycanthropic and vampiric edges are starting to affect those around her. Can Anita regain control of her increasingly unstable life?

Those desperately hoping that the plot will return in "Danse Macabre" can hang their heads and weep. There isn't a shred of actual plot in this book that isn't connected to the ardeur in some way -- no detecting, no zombies, no nothing. In fact, the biggest chill in this entire book is the pregnancy scare.

This isn't a plot in the sense that it really goes nowhere and nothing ever really comes of it; the book is left open-ended for the inevitable next volume. Even Hamilton doesn't seem to know what to do with the plot, since the writing is repetitive and often rather colourless.
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