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Danse Macabre [Mass Market Paperback]

Laurell K. Hamilton
2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Oct. 26 2010 Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter
In the thralls of supernatural passion, Anita Blake faces a most human dilemma.


Frequently Bought Together

Danse Macabre + The Harlequin + Micah
Price For All Three: CDN$ 28.87

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  • The Harlequin CDN$ 9.49
  • Micah CDN$ 9.89

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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

The uniquely complicated life of Anita Blake, the St. Louis–based necromancer, gets even more complicated when Anita discovers she may be pregnant in the 14th novel in bestseller Hamilton's vampire hunter series (Micah, etc.). Her sexual magic powers require multiple lovers, so there are six potential fathers. One possible dad, werewolf Richard, has trouble understanding that, baby or not, Anita's still a federal marshal who raises the dead and executes vampires. In addition, terrifying, life-threatening obstetrical challenges are involved, since the maybe-mommy has to deal with vampirism and several strains of lycanthropy coursing through her veins. That Anita has no detecting to do may disappoint some fans, but playing hostess to a gathering of North American vampire Masters of the City, ostensibly in town for a performance by a vampiric ballet troupe, keeps her plenty busy. When the vampire ballet takes the stage toward the end, several new plot elements emerge. The very lack of a finale suggests that there's no end in sight for this fabulously imagined series. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Last seen in Incubus Dreams (2004) and the novella Micah (2006), Anita Blake is back and more embroiled in supernatural politics than ever. She is in the market for a new pomme de sang to feed the otherworldly passion known as the ardeur that she and her lovers are subject to, but she has a more pressing problem on her hands when she discovers she might be pregnant. Anita can't imagine how a baby would fit in with her vampiric lifestyle, nor does she know which of her lovers is the father, though she suspects either possessive werewolf Richard or sensual wereleopard Nathaniel. To make matters worse, vampire masters are converging on the city for a massive meeting, and Anita is wary of her role in the gathering. This time Hamilton relies a little too heavily on complex vampire politics, though sex and intrigue abound, and Anita's pregnancy dilemma makes particularly compelling reading. Longtime series fans will enjoy the yarn while probably hoping there will be more action for Anita next time. Kristine Huntley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
"Danse Macabre" is the fourteenth Anita Blake novel from Laurell K. Hamilton (counting her "Micah" novella as the thirteenth outing) and opens with a hell of a hook: Anita's period is two weeks overdue and she is starting to freak out. If she is pregnant then the burning question of who is the father, which is immediately tied to "what" is the father. However, Anita does not have time to pick up a pregnancy test let alone take the test because Jean-Claude is throwing a big bash to welcome to St. Louis the first ever mostly-vampire dance company. He is one of the group's patrons and is throwing the party to help the group earn rave reviews. Several Masters of the City will be visiting and a couple of them have shown up early and there will be a preliminary event. But when Anita shows up at Circus of the Damned, Jean-Claude and Asher are off dealing with Meng Die, who has gone off of the deep end. This leaves the Executioner to host the visiting Masters and their entourages on her own. That is when things start getting bad, because Master vampires are prone to think they are superior to a mere human servant, but Anita Blake got past that line on her resume a long, long time ago.

I was encouraged when I started reading "Danse Macabre," not because of all of the possible complications a pregnancy would create for our heroine, but because a gathering of Masters of the City is fraught with even more potential for disasters. The first two Masters to show up cause major problems and they are supposedly friends of Jean-Claude. Word is getting around of what has been happening in St. Louis and there are those who think the way Jean-Claude is running things is a sign of weakness.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Porn or literature? Aug. 9 2006
Format:Hardcover
Other reviews here have gone into detail with some enthusiasm about the plot (or lack thereof), so I won't address it here. The author has some worthwhile insights into her society and, to her credit, has developed a supernatural culture that is of some interest. The culture appears to be based solely on the sensual, primarily sex. Like an x-rated movie, the entire purpose of the book appears to be to set up situations where the "heroine" can have sex with her many partners, and in my opinion, that makes this book porn. Soft-core porn, but porn nonetheless.

Ms. Hamilton explores her supernatural from an insider's view, and the point of view can allow for some interesting situations. Her characters are distinct, though you can't help feeling that the purpose of the book is to work out the author's own sexual fantasies with the main character as her avatar. I found the author's prose pedantic, and thought that it only lifts above the coarse when the author addresses her favorite topic, intercourse.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A real disapointment July 10 2006
Format:Hardcover
I remember when the Anita Blake books used to have a plot. This one, however, does not. It is mostly about sex, with her current partners, as well as some new ones. Hamilton is bordering on Erotica here, and if this is how she's going to continue to write, she may as well join the genre properly. I love the Anita Blake character, and found this book very disapointing. Although I am not quite ready to give up hope, and I am ready to stop buying these books in hardcover. I have no desire to own a book that I will never, ever read again.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not the worst...but that's not saying much Aug. 23 2006
By Seraph
Format:Hardcover
For what it's worth, I enjoyed this one more than Incubus Dreams. Unfortunately, other than a few random occurances, the entire plot of this book can be summed up in one line: Anita talks to everyone to find out more about the Ardeur.

By my best estimate, over 7/8 of this book is either Anita talking to someone (who you may or may not remember - I still can't place Clay and Graham in any of the prior books)or having sex with them...if you skip the monotonous dialogue and the uninspired orgy, you're left with about 3 chapters of story, and I use the term loosely.

On the up side, LKH does seem to be trying to tie up all of the unexplained metaphysical crap she's tossed at readers for the last three books, so that offers a bit of hope that maybe, just maybe, she's picking up the story again...of course, since I stopped buying them (three cheers for the library) after Cerulian Sins, I might be a bit more forgiving.

Overall, this book falls into the same trap as the last few...it has the odd few interesting plot chunks and ideas, but they're barely dealt with and certainly not developed to any reasonable conclusion.

Worth a read, but only if you really don't have anything better to be doing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By Kiwi
Format:Hardcover
More and more, the Anita Blake series is focusing on the preternatural sex and less and less on the vampire hunting and necromancy that were the main themes of the earlier books. I have to admit that the last Anita Blake novel in the series I really enjoyed was Obdsidian Butterfly. After that they're turning into a kind of Meredith Gentry variation (a series which I do in fact enjoy). Not bad but as others have noted, but the ending was a sad anti-climax and the spell of Anita Blake has been lost with Micah and with this novel as far as I personnally am concerned.
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