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Daphnis Et Chloé

Mixed Choir of the Bordeaux Ope Bordeaux Aquitaine National Orchestra , Ravel Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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1. Introduction Et Danse Religieuse
2. Les Jeunes Filles Attirent Daphnis
3. Daphnis S'Approche Tendrement De Chloe
4. Les Rires S'Interrompent
5. Une Lumiere Irreelle Enveloppe Le Paysage
6. Derriere La Scene On Entend Des Voix
7. Anime Et Rude
8. Bryaxis Ordonne D'Amener La Captive
9. Lever Du Jour
10. Le Vieux Berger Lammon
11. Bacchanale

Product Description

Daphnis et Chloe, generally regarded as Ravel's masterpiece, is one of the numerous important scores that owe their existence to the famous ballet impresario Sergey Diaghilev, who commissioned new works for his Paris-based troupe. Almost an hour long, Dap

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Most helpful customer reviews
Format:Audio CD
There are two classic recordings of the full 'Daphnis et Chloé' ballet (as opposed to either of the two suites taken from the score) -- those conducted by Pierre Monteux and by Charles Munch. Monteux, of course, conducted the premiere in 1912, and recorded it with the London Symphony and the Royal Opera House chorus some forty-odd years on and although that recording is now fifty-some years old, it is in vivid sound. Munch recorded it with the Boston Symphony and it, too, is getting long in the tooth and is in somewhat less modern sound. But both of those versions are superb musically. Against that competition I wondered what a barely known conductor/composer, Laurent Petitgirard, and a provincial French orchestra, Orchestre National Bordeaux Aquitaine, could come up with. Was I surprised and pleased! This recording deserves to be placed in the same company as the classic two, and is miles ahead of another recent recording of the complete ballet with Myung-Whun Chung conducting the Orchestra Philharmonique de Radio-France. The Monteux and Munch are still availabl, if I'm not mistaken, at the midprice level.

Of course, there is a vitally important choral component to the ballet score -- the chorus sings both onstage and offstage; one can only imagine what kind of comings and goings this causes in a concert performance. In this recording the singers are the excellent Bordeaux Opera Chorus.

There are many original touches in this sumptuous score, Ravel's longest, one that calls for a huge orchestra. The opening scene begins with muted string chords, offstage chorus and an ethereal flute line followed by an answer from the principal horn. The stage fills and the music builds to a shattering climax before setting into a religious dance with harp, strings and woodwinds.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ravel's Startlingly Original Complete Ballet Score in Modern Sound April 13 2007
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
There are two classic recordings of the full 'Daphnis et Chloé' ballet (as opposed to either of the two suites taken from the score) -- those conducted by Pierre Monteux and by Charles Munch. Monteux, of course, conducted the premiere in 1912, and recorded it with the London Symphony and the Royal Opera House chorus some forty-odd years on and although that recording is now fifty-some years old, it is in vivid sound. Munch recorded it with the Boston Symphony and it, too, is getting long in the tooth and is in somewhat less modern sound. But both of those versions are superb musically. Against that competition I wondered what a barely known conductor/composer, Laurent Petitgirard, and a provincial French orchestra, Orchestre National Bordeaux Aquitaine, could come up with. Was I surprised and pleased! This recording deserves to be placed in the same company as the classic two, and is miles ahead of another recent recording of the complete ballet with Myung-Whun Chung conducting the Orchestra Philharmonique de Radio-France. The Monteux and Munch are still availabl, if I'm not mistaken, at the midprice level.

Of course, there is a vitally important choral component to the ballet score -- the chorus sings both onstage and offstage; one can only imagine what kind of comings and goings this causes in a concert performance. In this recording the singers are the excellent Bordeaux Opera Chorus.

There are many original touches in this sumptuous score, Ravel's longest, one that calls for a huge orchestra. The opening scene begins with muted string chords, offstage chorus and an ethereal flute line followed by an answer from the principal horn. The stage fills and the music builds to a shattering climax before setting into a religious dance with harp, strings and woodwinds. This scene is as musically original as anything Ravel had written up to that time and there are points of similarity here and later with Stravinsky's 'Rite of Spring' which premiered with the same forces a year later. One can't help but think of Strauss's 'Dance of the Veils' from 'Salome' in the third scene in which temptress Lyceion lures shepherd Daphnis by dropping one veil after another, but the music is pure Ravel peppered with some Stravinskian rhythms as we now think of them -- but, remember, this is before 'Rite of Spring'.

The pirate scene is another which foreshadows 'Rite'. One has to wonder, frankly, whether Stravinsky knew the score -- surely he did since he was living in Paris and already associated with Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. Even if he did, though, this is not to gainsay Stravinsky's later achievement but rather to underline Ravel's originality. One does not tend to think of Ravel as capable of brutal orchestral effects, but here, in a section marked 'animé et rude', he presents primitive and exciting rhythms, softened (as Stravinsky's are not) by a certain sophisticated allure. The muttering, almost grunting male interjections in this scene always remind me of a similar effect late in Britten's 'Peter Grimes', thirty years later.

This is a gloriously original and effective score and it is given a gloriously effective reading here by Petitgirard and his forces. I would without hesitation place this on the same level as the aforementioned Munch and Monteux. Add to that the budget price and modern sound and this is an easy recommendation.

Scott Morrison
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best Daphnis Discs Nov. 9 2011
By christianw7 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I'm another one of those fanatics who has owned or heard dozens of recordings of this piece, so hopefully that at least qualifies me to write this review! Up to now, my favorite digital recording of this work was Maurice Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé / La Valse - Berliner Philharmoniker / Pierre Boulez which is excellent in every way. It is now a toss up. My favorite classic analog recordings are those conducted by Monteux Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé / Rapsodie espagnole / Pavane ~ Monteux, and also Martinon, now available in this set: Ravel: Orchestral Works. You can hear details in the Martinon that are inaudible in most others, and there's something special in the Monteux that makes it unique and indispensable. But this newer disc conducted by Petitgirard is just as good in its own way: a fresh interpretation, vivid digital sound and budget price! Worth purchasing, either for those who are new to the work or fanatical collectors like me!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but remember the competition April 25 2013
By John J. Puccio - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The performance is fine. It's the Naxos disc's price point that's the main problem; at about $8.99 MSRP, it comes into direct competitiohn with Pierre Monteux's celebrated 1959 recording (Decca), Charles Munch's Boston account from around the same era as Monteux's (RCA), and Charles Dutoit's newer digital rendering (Decca), all of them now available on mid-priced releases for about $8.98-$11.98 suggested retail. Back in the days when Naxos sold for $5.99 or even $6.99, they were terrific, bargain values, especially considering they were often discounted below five bucks. These days, they sell new for close to the same cost as most mid-priced discs, and, frankly, the competition in basic repertoire items like this one is murder.

Not to take anything away from Petitgirard, but Monteux, Munch, and Dutoit are marginally more lyrical, more passionate, more exciting, and more atmospheric than he is, and they are also well recorded in their own way. So, there are always choices.

John J. Puccio
Classical Candor
5.0 out of 5 stars The Adventures of Daphnis and Chloe Dec 4 2013
By Eric S. Kim - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
For some odd reason, I hadn't considered listening to Ravel's music until now. Oh sure, I've listened to his Bolero, but really, who hasn't? So I decided to expand my knowledge of Ravel's musical universe by purchasing a recording of his complete version of Daphnis et Chloe. The ballet music is typically impressionistic: it has that Debussy-like ambiance and tough iron fist like Respighi's. There are a couple of moments that might indicate pretentiousness, but all in all, much of the music sounds incredible. Being the longest work that Ravel ever composed (an average of 55 to 60 minutes), it's a very exhilarating and scintillating experience.

I didn't know which recording I would get first. I heard a lot of strong praise surrounding Charles Dutoit's rendition with the Orchestre Symphonique de Montreal, as well as Pierre Boulez's with the Berliner Philharmoniker. In the end, I went with a recording from Naxos. With Laurent Petitgirard and the Orchestre National Bordeaux Aquitaine, this one could very well be a bit of a sleeper hit. I can't compare interpretations, but after the first listen, I did find this recording very enticing. Everything runs along smoothly, with plenty of pure adrenaline from start to finish. Let's not forget the more lyrical moments: some of the more ethereal moments are done with excellence. Maestro Petitgirard does a really fine job with moving things along. He never overfills the medium with overdone drama, and he never loses tension.

The Orchestra itself sounds impressive. I really can't complain with their performance: all of the musicians are heard loud and clear, and everything sounds polished (but not too polished). The wordless choir sounds beautiful, and the sound quality from Naxos is a plus.

Official Grade: 9.5 out of 10
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything but the dance. Feb. 13 2008
By Viktor Lux - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Ravel's longest work was written for ballet. This recording, strong on dramatic verve, excellent miking of chorus as well as orchestra, is so rich, so nuanced as to make me wish to see the choreography that went along with it. It also makes one wonder about the orgiastic dancing of the pirates.
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