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Dark Passage


List Price: CDN$ 18.70
Price: CDN$ 16.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Dark Passage + To Have & Have Not + The Big Sleep (1946)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 52.68

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  • To Have & Have Not CDN$ 18.70

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  • The Big Sleep (1946) CDN$ 16.99

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Product Details

  • Actors: Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Bruce Bennett, Agnes Moorehead, Tom D'Andrea
  • Directors: Delmer Daves
  • Writers: Delmer Daves, David Goodis
  • Producers: Jack L. Warner, Jerry Wald
  • Format: Black & White, Closed-captioned, DVD-Video, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French, English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: July 25 2006
  • Run Time: 106 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000FFJYAC
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #26,924 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Nov. 11 2003
Format: DVD
Pay no attention to the editorial review...
Pay no attention to the "Lady In The Lake" review.
That's okay... I can see that MOST people don't get this film.
If you like a "smart" film, "Dark Passage" is one of "THE" best.
I will acknowledge, The Big Sleep (although, Martha Vickers, who plays Lauren Bacall's sister is more interesting than Bacall in this film), Maltese Falcon (which is tedious and pretentious), To Have And Have Not (there's some good performances but after repeated viewing they wear on you), Key Largo (a GREAT film in which ALL actors are great and Claire Trevor deserved the Oscar), however, Bacalls "acting" was almost a stereotype from the start. She REALLY shines BRILLIANTLY in Dark Passage - the whole PREMISE for this film is the beginning setup in which we don't see Bogarts face - DUH... it's part of the PLOT man!... and it sets up the WHOLE FILM.
To watch Agnes Mooreheads face when she finally realizes that... well... I won't give it away but, trust me, WATCH HER FACE - it is a magical moment of film!
Talk about "film noir"?... THIS IS IT... AT IT'S BEST!
Are some people so lame that they don't know it IS Bogart at the beginning of the film? Do you HAVE to see a "recognizable" face?... The "FACE" of a Film Star?? before you allow yourself to appreciate the fact that the director is treating the audience with respect for our "intelligence" that we can "survive" without seeing Bogarts face for a while?
Anyway, once Bacall got away from the rigidity of the "STUDIO MACHINE", she started to relax in her acting and became the actor she always SHOULD have been and HAS been to date...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By H. L. Harrington on Aug. 29 2003
Format: DVD
One of Bogart's best. Up there with The Maltese Falcon and To Have and Have Not. Highly recommended to fans of Bogart, Bacall, and Agnes Morehead.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nix Pix on Nov. 4 2003
Format: DVD
"Dark Passage" is the last time Bogart and Bacall were teamed together on screen. The resulting film noir was not a box office sensation when it originally hit theaters, perhaps in part due to the first person camera perspective employed during the first forty minutes of the narrative and then the additional absence of seeing Bogart's character, except behind a swath of bandages for most of the latter half of the film. However, like most great film noir, "Dark Passage" has outlived its initial disappointment to become a classic. Bogart is Vincent Parry, a man accused of murdering his wife and sent to prison for life. But he escapes San Quentin prison and is rescued by Irene Jansen (Bacall). Irene smuggles Parry past police, across the Golden Gate Bridge and to her San Francisco apartment. From there Parry procures a plastic surgeon to alter his facial features, but first takes off to visit his old friend, George Fellsinger (Rory Mallinson). However, when Parry returns to George's flat he finds that someone has murdered his best friend. Knowing that he will be considered the first choice of suspect in this crime, Parry retreats to Irene's apartment where she looks after him for the duration of his healing. With his new face looking like the spitting image of Humphrey Bogart, Parry heads over to his ex-wife's former friend, Madge Rapf (Agnes Moorehead). She is the one responsible for Parry's wife's murder and when Parry confronts Madge with his knowledge, she realizes who the stranger is, attempts to escape, but accidentally falls from the seventh story to her death. With no conceivable way of proving that Madge killed his wife and George, Parry contacts Irene with his next port of call.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JK on June 5 2004
Format: DVD
The best of black-and-white films are such that the viewer forgets very quickly that there is no color. If truly good, it will impart a style and an atmosphere that color can't duplicate. By 1947, when this movie was made, there wasn't much that a major studio couldn't do superbly in B/W. All their talent has been transferred to this DVD.
The premise for this movie is indeed improbable, and the idea that someone would want to change into the Bogart time-worn face is laughable. However, the interplay between the Bogarts is electric, and she never looked any sexier. The San Francisco art deco buildings and scenery is an added bonus. Agnes Moorhead, certainly one of our most underrated radio and film actresses, was never better as the catty friend. As a variation of film noir, though, this is fun to watch and gets better with each viewing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Simon Davis on May 4 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Often passed off as the least successful of the four screen teamings of legendary Hollywood couple Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, "Dark Passage", despite its often unlikely premise has much to recommend it. Bogie is always riverting to watch on screen even in his lesser films and his work in "Dark Passage", as an escaped convict undergoing plastic surgery to try to clear his name over the murder of his wife is first rate. While the film certainly lacks a degree of the unique verbal sparring that viewers have come to expect of Bogie and Bacall's work together, the personal chemistry is still there and just as magic between the two. It is these two performers aided greatly by the superb Agnes Moorehead in the type of vinegary characterisation that she made uniquely her own in the 1940's that really elevates this story and manages to make many of the incredible turn of events that bit more believable.
Based on a David Goodis novel, director Delmer Daves also took over responsibility for the screenplay and weaved an engrossing if not always plausible story centred around Vincent Parry (Bogart) who we see in the first scene making his escape on the back of a truck from San Quentin Prison. Picked up a few minutes later by artist Irene Jansen (Bacall), who happened to be doing some painting in the surrounding hills as the prison siren went off, Vincent finds himself suddenly with a staunch ally in his quest to get to the bottom of his wife's murder. Irene takes Vincent back to her apartment in San Francisco where her attraction to him becomes immediately evident.She explains that her sudden determination to help him despite the personal risks to herself, is the result of her interest in his case and the firm belief that he was framed for his wife's murder.
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