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Dark Tower: Treachery Hardcover – May 5 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel (May 5 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 078513574X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785135746
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.4 x 26.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 567 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #98,650 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on June 6 2009
Format: Hardcover
Roland Deschain has suffered a lot and lost a lot in the last two arcs of the "Dark Tower" graphic novels-- and unfortunately he doesn't have an easier time when he finally gets home.

Picking up after the end of the prior arc, Stephen King's "Dark Tower: Treachery" brings our hero and his embattled ka-tet back to Gilead and more trouble waiting for them. Between Jae Lee's gorgeously gritty, colourful artwork and King's almost Shakespearean tragedies, it's a moving piece of work that shows how Roland Deschain became the gunslinger anti-hero we know and love.

Alain and Bert are made official gunslingers, but are troubled by Roland's continuing obsession with the Grapefruit and the horrors it contains -- visions of the Crimson King, of a blood-coloured wasteland, and of his murdered father. In the meantime, their fathers set out to destroy Farson's gang, nearly costing one of the gunslingers his life; Cort's teenage niece embraces the life and practices of a gunslinger, even though she isn't allowed to technically become one.

Worst of all, Roland's disgraced mother Gabrielle (sent to repent in a nunnery) is seduced back into doing Marten's bidding, so he can destroy the "mighty beast that is the gunslingers." And after Roland almost shoots his best friends, he tries to do the right thing by handing the Grapefruit to his father -- but he already knows too much of the horrific danger approaching Gilead.

Most of "Dark Tower: Treachery" is the calm before the storm -- the forces of evil are approaching Gilead but most of the people there don't know yet. So while this is a slower-moving affair than "The Gunslinger Born" and "The Long Road Home," all the piece of an epic clash are clicking into place.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 44 reviews
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Home sweet home April 21 2009
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Roland Deschain has suffered a lot and lost a lot in the last two arcs of the "Dark Tower" graphic novels-- and unfortunately he doesn't have an easier time when he finally gets home.

Picking up after the end of the prior arc, Stephen King's "Dark Tower: Treachery" brings our hero and his embattled ka-tet back to Gilead and more trouble waiting for them. Between Jae Lee's gorgeously gritty, colourful artwork and King's almost Shakespearean tragedies, it's a moving piece of work that shows how Roland Deschain became the gunslinger anti-hero we know and love.

Alain and Bert are made official gunslingers, but are troubled by Roland's continuing obsession with the Grapefruit and the horrors it contains -- visions of the Crimson King, of a blood-coloured wasteland, and of his murdered father. In the meantime, their fathers set out to destroy Farson's gang, nearly costing one of the gunslingers his life; Cort's teenage niece embraces the life and practices of a gunslinger, even though she isn't allowed to technically become one.

Worst of all, Roland's disgraced mother Gabrielle (sent to repent in a nunnery) is seduced back into doing Marten's bidding, so he can destroy the "mighty beast that is the gunslingers." And after Roland almost shoots his best friends, he tries to do the right thing by handing the Grapefruit to his father -- but he already knows too much of the horrific danger approaching Gilead.

Most of "Dark Tower: Treachery" is the calm before the storm -- the forces of evil are approaching Gilead but most of the people there don't know yet. So while this is a slower-moving affair than "The Gunslinger Born" and "The Long Road Home," all the piece of an epic clash are clicking into place. And you can tell that this is not going to end well for the people around our tortured young hero.

As rewritten by Peter David, King's rich, old-time narrative translates well into comic form, almost as if he were conversing with the readers ("Now there are some who simply equate riddles with jokes..."). And his simple dialogue has a powerful sound, mingling Old West and medieval styles ("I have the rest of eternity to feel no pain. I'll endure what I must until then").

And since this is a King story, there are moments of sheer horror: the killing of Charles and his poor little baby, and Steven's ka-tet stopping a fatal wound with gunpowder. The inside of the Grapefruit is relatively tame, but the close-ups of the Crimson King are pretty nightmarish.

Jae Lee weaves a colourful, hazy painting around the entire story as well, with plenty of striking artwork (a naked, emaciated Roland hugging the glowing Grapefruit). He splits much of the narrative between where the good guys are (the dusty, rather run-down citadel of Gilead) and the bad guys' domain (blood-red skies, twisted trees, all-engulfing mist and the suitably reddish domain of the King). It's lovely work.

Roland really gets put through the grinder here -- not only is he haunted by his torture inside the Grapefruit and the loss of Susan Delgado, but he basically becomes a Grapefruit junkie. Alain and Bert get to shine as newly-minted gunslingers and steadfast friends, and Aileen adds a strong female presence to the cast. They need it, since the only other surviving woman is Gabrielle -- and it's hard to see how a strong guy like Roland could have such a pitifully weak mother.

"Dark Tower: Treachery" is the windup for a devastating blow, and its lack of a central plot is its only weakness. Glorious art, a scarred teenage hero and plenty of eerie bad guys make this a great adaptation.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
"In a world that has moved on..." July 2 2009
By trashcanman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
To those not in the know, Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series began with one of the first stories he ever wrote, The Gunslinger, which would eventually be published in 1982 as a standalone tale in a post-apocalyptic world of a man in black who fled across the desert and the gunslinger who followed. But King had plans. Big plans. 33 years later, his magnum opus was completed with the release of the seventh and final book in the most epic undertaking of his extremely prolific career. His original notion was a The Lord of the Rings-inspired tale that would weave together genres of fiction and conglomerate them all into a single existing multiverse. I said "epic undertaking" already, right? Horror, science fiction, fantasy, and especially westerns served as jumping off points for the series' premise which then grew to include metafiction and eventually every possible work of fiction all existing simultaneously with our own world. You'd think the conclusion of the story would have been enough. But King is not only in the process of revising and rewriting the entire series to fix glaring errors that resulted from the long delays between books, but he has also teamed up with Marvel Comics to fill in the massive gaps in the origin of the series' protagonist, Roland Deschain, in style. The first arc in this prequel series, The Gunslinger Born, was little more then an abridged retelling of the tale told by Roland that takes up most of the fourth novel, Wizard and Glass, which set up the chain of events that would lead to the Fall of Gilead. It was excellent. The Long Road Home followed it up with a story that felt a bit uneventful and forced, but was visually as impressive as the first arc. Plus, there were mutant wolves. Awesome mutant wolves. With "Treachery" the event are now in full swing and writers Robin Furth and Peter David have really hit their groove and are back to doing the original series justice.

"Treachery" picks up with the young Roland and his band of friends (ka-tet) returning from an ill-fated mission that changed them all forever and set in motion the wheels that would eventually leave only a cold and broken-hearted Roland standing. With Roland being a mess and in the thrall of evil forces, much of the story revolves around the side characters which turns out to be a very good thing. Alain and Cuthbert receive their guns as payment for thier service, which causes a rift between them and their jealous compadres who have to face exile to earn that honor. Meanwhile the mentor of all of Gilead's gunslingers has a problem with a strong-willed niece who feels she is every bit the fighter as the men and dreams of being a gunslinger herself which is forbidden to women. Marten the sorceror, who is the ultimate Stephen King villain and has been in many books under many names (most famously Randall Flagg) concludes his complete seduction of Roland's mother, who is tapped while doing penance for her sins to commit the ultimate betrayal. Meanwhile, Roland's father, the leader of Gilead, and his company run into some serious trouble of their own. This is the most brutal entry into the series yet and features some seriously horrific imagery. Ever seen an unborn full-term child ripped from the mother's belly in a comic book? Damn. They are not messing around. This is definitely the strongest Dark Tower graphic novel to come out yet and is worth wading through the rehash of the first arc and the relative mediocrity of the second. Fans of sex and violence will be well-served and there is plenty for fantasy fanatics as well. With this set-up, the series conclusion "The Fall of Gilead" should be epic.

If you are unfamiliar with the Dark Tower series, you probably are not a legit Stephen King fan and I honestly can't tell you how much you'll get out of this comic series. The imagery is astounding at times and the story starts at the very beginning so I imagine so long as you begin with "The Gunslinger Born" you'll be fine, but there's no substitute for the original novels as far as groundwork for this comic goes. Mid World has it's own dialects, terminology, and culture that will make fans of the novels feel right at home, but the writers here were fairly accommodating in utilizing it in a way that is easy to catch onto so newcomers need not feel too intimidated. The big complaint with these collections is that they throw out the additional content found in the original comic issues. The stories and appendices are wonderful and do so much to flesh out the lore, culture, and history of Mid Land that I simply cannot believe that Marvel would leave these vital pieces of this series out. No way is any of these collection getting a perfect score like that. If you have not read the Dark Tower books, you really should. It's a remarkable series that sadly falters in the end, but is still an absolute necessity for King fans if for no other reason then it's sheer scope and ambition. Understanding those novels will certainly aid in your appreciation of this comic book series, but if you are like me and can't get a moment's peace to get into a full novel these days then give this series a try if your up for something different and cool that redefines classic western iconography and combines it with science fiction and fantasy.
4 1/2 stars, rounded down for skimping content.

"I do not aim with my hand.
He who aims with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
I aim with my Eye.

I do not shoot with my hand.
He who shoots with his handhas forgotten the face of his father.
I shoot with my Mind.

I do not kill with my gun.
He who kills with his gun has forgotten the face of his father.
I kill with my Heart"
-Gunslinger's Creed
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Beware of this Addiction Aug. 27 2009
By S. W. Collins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I picked up on the gunslinger series long ago when I was still in the military. The concept of the earth moving on and reverting to the old west intermixed tapped into my younger days watching westerns (which are no longer in vogue) and mysticism. I finished the last novel when it was released and felt a lot had been left out. Since then, I took a job in Iraq and was surprised to see that King decided to create a graphic novel that give more information about Roland's early years.

This is the third series I purchased. The first I purchased as individual comics and appreciated the sidebar information they provided in each issue. I purchased The Long Road Home and Treachery as combined novels. They didn't give the side bar, but the content is first rate. King has a way of building you up with anticipation for the next page then shattering all faith you have left in humanity.

I went home on vacation this past May knowing my son was just finishing up the first novel in the Gunslinger series and I told him I would bring my graphic novels so he could get a better understanding of the novel. Treachery arrived just prior to me leaving and I decided to read it once I got home.

If you are like me, since I had been away for so long there was a honey do list as long as my arm and so many people to see that I didn't get a chance to start reading until my last couple days home. This volume is very intense and provided more action and suspense than The Long Road Home. It also introduces Cort's niece who has fire and bravado. It gives quite a bit more information about Roland's mother and her tragic failings. I had to take the book with me to finish once I returned to Iraq.

When I called back to announce that I had arrived, imagine my shock when my wife was interrupted by my son asking what happened to the last book. He had read all the previous graphic novels and was dying to read how the third volume turned out. I ended up having to purchase him a copy and send it to him. I called him a few days later and we talked about the story for nearly an hour.

If that doesn't tell you how compelling these novels are, I don't have the capacity to explain it better. I am patiently waiting for the next volume The Fall of Gilead to be complete so I can find out what happens next. I now understand the crazed woman in Misery who went to such ends to force the writer to keep it going. Good luck dealing with your addiction should you start this journey.
An excellent adaptation June 18 2013
By J. Binkerd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Roland, Bert and Alain are safely back home in Gilead after their "adventures" in Hambry and points east. Well, they're back, anyways....Safe is another matter. Roland has returned with the crystal ball/Palantir-thingie refered to as "Maerlyn's Grapefruit," stolen from the evil clutches of Rhea of the Coos, a servant of "Good Man" John Farson. Farson will be wanting it back, and in the meantime Roland's obsession with it is none too healthy. Bert and Alain are faring somewhat better, but all is still not well. It seems that the other Gunslingers-in-training resent what they see as Bert and Alain riding Roland's shirttails and earning their guns without passing the trials. Then there's Aileen, Cort's niece, who more fancies life as a Gunslinger than as a proper lady. A bad thing? Maybe doesn't seem so to you or me, but its an idea that will upset the way of things in Gilead if given any standing at all. And all the while, the forces of John Farson and his master The Crimson King grow closer and infiltrate the walls and homes of Gilead....sometimes wearing the faces of those our heroes trust most.....

If you recall, I was disappointed with the last volume. That had everything to do with the awkward position the first volume (actually drawn straight from King's works) left them in. With this book the creative team can really take off and do their own thing, and they manage it brilliantly. Peter David's writing captures King's style well, and the narration evokes the world King created brilliantly. However, the real star of the book--the series, so far as I'm concerned--is the art. Jae Lee's use of heavy blacks in his line art contrasts beautifully with the brilliant colors of Richard Isanove. I am tempted to call the book and its artwork beautiful, but I cringe at applying that adjective to something so grim and that I know is headed for a bad end.....
MY GRADE: B plus. May 23 2012
By MISTER SJEM - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
NOTE: the first part of this review is about the series, in general, and the last part covers this particular volume.

FROM MY REVIEW OF THE FIRST GRAPHIC NOVEL

I never got into the novel series but after reading this particular graphic novel I just might give it another try. This volume focuses on the Gunslinger before he became a legend in this post apocalyptic Spaghetti Western Fantasy tale. It covers the legends of his home realm life, how he earned his guns at an early age and his first mission which led to him meeting his first love.

King was creatively involved in the making of this graphic novel. I suspect this will be a spoiler on some level if I ever reach book four of the novel series but that's all right as I wasn't going to give King's series another chance until I picked this piece up.

The tone is dark, gritty and at times brutal and women don't have many options unless they hold a great deal of power. The artwork was impressively done with tight facial shots, focus on shadows and some nice running scenes sometimes all completed on one page. There's a nice map in the back to give you an idea of the overall world which I found very helpful as this was my first time experiencing the world. King was creatively involved in the making of this graphic novel. I suspect this will be a spoiler on some level if I ever reach book four of the novel series but that's all right as I wasn't going to give King's series another chance until I picked this piece up.

BOOK THREE

In this installment Roland (the future gunslinger) and his pals (known as a ka-tet which is something like blood brothers who will die for you) return home to receive awards yet treachery is afoot in bringing down Gilead (no surprise to readers since the next book is titled "The Fall of Gilead"). A young female gunslinger is introduced as well as a focus on Roland's relationship with his father and outcast mother. More focuses on the Dark Tower and The Crimson King, as well.

The first issue topped the March comic sales figures, with an estimated 123,807 sold, 20,000 more than the next comic, New Avengers.

CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B to B; STORY/PLOTTING: B to B plus; ARTWORK: B plus to A minus; SETTING/TONE: B plus to A minus; OVERALL GRADE: B plus; WHEN READ: mid May 2012.


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