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Days of Blood and Fire Paperback – Jun 1 1994


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Days of Blood and Fire + Days of Air and Darkness + A Time of Omens
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Spectra; Reprint edition (June 1 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553290126
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553290127
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 3.3 x 17.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #484,588 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Library Journal

A young boy and a blind bard journey to the land of Deverry, home of the ancient conquerors of their people, in fulfillment of an oath--and find themselves swept up in a war to save their ancestral enemies from a mad goddess. Set in the world of A Time of Omens ( LJ 6/15/92), this stand-alone tale features heretofore unexplored civilizations as well as characters that Deverry series fans will remember. Kerr's more complex cosmologies take a backseat to classic fantasy themes in this well-conceived introduction to an ongoing series. Recommended for most fantasy collections.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

Kerr's latest fantasy novel of the Westlands continues the story begun in A Time of Omens (1992). To escape entrapment on the etheric plane, Guardian Evander has arranged for his daughter, Elessario, to be born to a mundane, Princess Carra of Deverry. However, a powerful, evil, and mad goddess, Alshandra, is plotting to frustrate him, and the conflict soon involves some familiar characters--Jill the Dweomer-master and Rhodry the mercenary silver dagger--along with the usual assortment of bards, seers, warriors, nobles, elves, and talented children. Eventually, it emerges that Rhodry must go forth in search of the dragon Arzosah, without whose aid the good guys cannot win. These ingredients are stirred slowly with dollops of reincarnation, predestination, magic, and fate. Kerr's scenario is detailed but uninteresting, her plots large but unmotivated, her narrative agreeable but meandering and sluggish. For series fans only. -- Copyright ©1993, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Similar to "The Dragon Revenant" Kerr again returns to a linear plot previously set up in "Time of Omens," again abandoning her usual interaction of stories set within differing time periods. Obviously by now I am an enthusiast of the tale and world begun in "Daggerspell" and would recommend fans of better fantasy fiction take a look. Despite the positive response of the previous reviewer, however, Kerr's books are not written as stand-alones, and without the information provided by the earlier works, one's enjoyment of this book will be greatly limited. Despite the fact that it was the weakest book in the series, start with "Daggerspell": By the time you reach "Days of Blood and Fire" I'm sure you'll conclude that the considerable time invested was enjoyably well spent.
I do however have one reservation regarding this book: The introduction of a dragon. It may be a personal quirk on my part, but rarely have I found the active appearance of dragons in a tale either satisfying or credible. Often anthropomorphised in manner either typecast or silly - McCaffrey's romanticized and laughable wyrms are but the most notable examples - their inclusion as characters almost invariably fails to be convincing (At the risk of sacrilege I would include Tolkein's Smaug). Though the dragon here is present for only a few pages, it is apparant that it will play a large role in the next book, and it talks, which may not bode well for the conclusion of the series. Those of you who delight in clever wyrms, carry on. I will reserve final comment for completion of the next book.
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By A Customer on June 27 1999
Format: Paperback
Whether or not you started with Daggerspell or if you have just recently started reading the works of Katharine Kerr, you should definately read this. I found the book entertaining with all the old characters mixed with the new and their wonderful skill at getting wound up in problems that seem to large to remedy. You get to see parts of her world that you do not see in the other books which is always exciting with this author. She transends into the world "high fantasy" well and the ending is rather different from most of her others because it is sudden and leads into the next book.
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Format: Paperback
This is the best fantasy book that I have ever read, and possibly one of the best books overall. Anyone who is a fantasy reader should definately pick this one up. It kept me on the edge of my seat right up until the end, where I immediately ran out to pick up "Days of Air and Darkness" to find out how this chapter in the Deverry saga ended. Full of action, intrige, and emotion, this book is sure to give anyone a good read. I am about to order the rest of the series to see what else has gone on.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
This book is worth every cent. Aug. 23 1998
By lonewolf_1122@hotmail.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the best fantasy book that I have ever read, and possibly one of the best books overall. Anyone who is a fantasy reader should definately pick this one up. It kept me on the edge of my seat right up until the end, where I immediately ran out to pick up "Days of Air and Darkness" to find out how this chapter in the Deverry saga ended. Full of action, intrige, and emotion, this book is sure to give anyone a good read. I am about to order the rest of the series to see what else has gone on.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Book Seven of an Outstanding Series June 24 1999
By Elyon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Similar to "The Dragon Revenant" Kerr again returns to a linear plot previously set up in "Time of Omens," again abandoning her usual interaction of stories set within differing time periods. Obviously by now I am an enthusiast of the tale and world begun in "Daggerspell" and would recommend fans of better fantasy fiction take a look. Despite the positive response of the previous reviewer, however, Kerr's books are not written as stand-alones, and without the information provided by the earlier works, one's enjoyment of this book will be greatly limited. Despite the fact that it was the weakest book in the series, start with "Daggerspell": By the time you reach "Days of Blood and Fire" I'm sure you'll conclude that the considerable time invested was enjoyably well spent.
I do however have one reservation regarding this book: The introduction of a dragon. It may be a personal quirk on my part, but rarely have I found the active appearance of dragons in a tale either satisfying or credible. Often anthropomorphised in manner either typecast or silly - McCaffrey's romanticized and laughable wyrms are but the most notable examples - their inclusion as characters almost invariably fails to be convincing (At the risk of sacrilege I would include Tolkein's Smaug). Though the dragon here is present for only a few pages, it is apparant that it will play a large role in the next book, and it talks, which may not bode well for the conclusion of the series. Those of you who delight in clever wyrms, carry on. I will reserve final comment for completion of the next book.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Quite entertaining June 27 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Whether or not you started with Daggerspell or if you have just recently started reading the works of Katharine Kerr, you should definately read this. I found the book entertaining with all the old characters mixed with the new and their wonderful skill at getting wound up in problems that seem to large to remedy. You get to see parts of her world that you do not see in the other books which is always exciting with this author. She transends into the world "high fantasy" well and the ending is rather different from most of her others because it is sudden and leads into the next book.
Sixth in the Ten Book (currently) Series Aug. 1 2006
By EquesNiger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In the peaceful land of the Riddaer, Jahdo the ratcatcher's son stumbles upon a meeting between a city councilman and a dangerous, mysterious woman. Suddenly the boy is tangled in a web of intrigue and black magic that drags him far from his beloved home. In the company of Meer, a blind bard of the Horsekin, Jahdo must travel to Deverry to unravel the evil that binds him. Gut there the boy is caught up in dangers far greater than any he has ever known. Two powerful sorcerers--the human Jill and the elven Dallandra--are battling to save the country from a goddess gone mad. Their strongest ally is the mercenary soldier Rhodry Maelwaedd, a berserker bound to both women by fate and magic...and to the dragon upon whom all their lives may depend. For fantasy lovers who have never read the novels of Deverry before, Days of Blood and Fire is the place to begin.

Katherine Kerr's writing takes a bit of getting used to, but it's worth the effort. She approaches her stories with a Celtic storytelling mindset, which means she conveys events according to their significance to the story, as opposed to chronologically. Consequently, while the stories begin in the "present" (which is an elastic concept, anyway, in a fantasy setting), the events unfold, chapter wise, both in the "present" and in the distant past. This can be frustrating, at first, but Kerr's writing is heavily steeped in Pagan and Western Mystery tradition, and the Celtic setting (and mindset) of her characters means that time, or chronological time, is not essentially relevant. To be honest, I found the first book infuriating, as I spent a lot of time trying to adjust to the writing style. However, I found the story engrossing enough that I persevered, and by the second book was so hooked I've read all ten in her three series.

Kerr's story evolves around the concept of reincarnation, and unfinished business, and "karma", and fate. The same souls recur again and again, just in new bodies, over the course of the centuries over which the story unfolds.

Kerr's world is one of High Fantasy, populated by Elves, Men, and Dwarves, as well as faeries/elementals, which she terms the "Wildfolk". However, hers is a slightly more dark, dangerous and less clear cut world than the works of other High Fantasy authors, not the least due to the fact that someone who was your friend in a former life can re-emerge in the story centuries later as a foe, and vice versa. There is a tremendous amount of magic, but it's the magic of the Western Mystery tradition (quite a bit of Golden Dawn and even Enochiana), and that of R.J. Stewarts Faery tradition. There are dragons, and giant beast men.

The Elves are a fallen race, driven out of their magnificent and palatial cities centuries before by invaders, and who now roam the plains as primitives. They possess the potential to be superlative magicians, but the knowledge was lost in the fall of their civilization. Humans, though warlike and shorter lived, have preserved this knowledge, but guard it jealously. The Wildfolk, basically magic incarnate, are unhinged from the effects of "karma", but lack permanence of personality, and cannot grow or develop, cursed to stagnation. The Dwarves are a secretive mystery, entrenched within the earth. Each has something to offer the other, and the story that unfolds is the story of this "technology" exchange, of sorts, between them.

Fans of Marion Zimmer Bradley, who clearly influenced Kerr, will be enraptured by this series, as will fans of Kate Eliott, who Kerr, herself, clearly influenced. It's phenomenal! Devotees of the New Age, Esoteric or Occult will find themselves nodding and smiling as they read, and sincerely hoping Kerr's writing will do for the Western Mystery and Faery traditions what Bradley's has done for Wicca.
Good, even without the background May 16 2005
By Vanessa E. Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be quite enjoyable, though I think that I would have liked it more if I had read the other books in the series. It stood on it's own rather well, but there were a few things that I didn't understand as well as I think I could have if I'd read the other books.

The only thing that really bothered me about this book was the name of the Sorceress. Jill just didn't fit in with the other names in the book, and the excuse that was given wasn't a very good one, or at least it wasn't to someone who had only read that book. It was alluded that there might have been a better explanation in another book, something to do with who her father was, but it was not satisfactory to me.

I did, however, find the characters to be vibrant and the plot to be engaging, so that little complaint really isn't much of a complaint at all. This was, I thought, a rather decent fantasy novel and if I stumble across more of her work, I will likely pick it up.


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