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De pratica seu arte tripudii: `On the Practice or Art of Dancing' Paperback – Apr 30 1999


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First Sentence
FIFTEENTH-century Italy produced the earliest known treatises on the art of the dance. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Very informative intro and translation of 15th C. manuscript Aug. 31 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Anyone who is interested in reconstructing 15-16th Century Italian dance will find this book very practical, and I recommend it very highly indeed. A great deal of effort has been put into the introductory chapters which describe not only the origins and history of the document itself but also a great deal about the life of its author Guglielmo Ebreo (William the Jew, later known as Giovanni Ambrosio). These chapters provide a useful insight into upper class life of the period. The translation itself is presented in the most practical possible fashion, with the original Italian and corresponding English translation on facing pages. This makes it possible for an English-speaking reconstructor to rely mainly on the English text while still having the option of going back to the original words if clarification or a different interpretation might be possible. The music has been converted to modern notation, which makes it accessible to all musicians rather than restricting it to the scholarly minority. For dancers, this is good news. *** If you're into Renaissance dance, buy this book! ***


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