Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Furniture All-New Kindle Paperwhite Music Deals Store NFL Tools
Dead And Buried (Ben Cooper & Diane Fry series Book 12) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
CDN$ 3.85
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Moderate wear on cover and edges. Minimal highlighting and/or other markings can be present. May be ex-library copy and may not include CD, Accessories and/or Dust Cover. Good readable copy.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dead and Buried Paperback – Jul 31 2012


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Jul 31 2012
CDN$ 149.86 CDN$ 3.28
Audio Cassette
"Please retry"

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student




Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere; Export ed edition (July 31 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847444822
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847444820
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 15.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 499 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #276,998 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Powerful, atmospheric...ingeniously plotted―Reginald Hill

Stephen Booth creates a fine sense of place and atmosphere―Sunday Telegraph --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Stephen Booth is the internationally bestselling, CWA Dagger-winning author of twelve acclaimed thrillers featuring Cooper and Fry. The series is in development as a TV programme. Booth lives in Nottingham.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gloria Feit on Oct. 7 2012
Format: Hardcover
As this book opens, firefighters in the Peak District of England are fighting what seems to be a losing battle, trying to contain the flames engulfing this part of Derbyshire, with smoke covering acres and acres of the moors from the catastrophic wildfires that have been springing up, the worst seen in the area in decades, many undoubtedly the result of arson. But to D.S. Ben Cooper, his more immediate problem are the buried items found by the crew working one of the sites, and which appear to be clothing and other items – including a wallet and credit cards - which had belonged to a young couple who had seemingly disappeared over two years ago, in the middle of a snowstorm. They had last been seen in a local pub, with no trace found since, and the case, while no longer active, is as cold as it could be.

The Major Crime Unit is called in, and DS Diane Fry, Ben’s old nemesis, is put in charge. [Diane had been his immediate supervisor before his promotion to detective sergeant.] Diane, for her part, couldn’t be happier that she had, as she thought, put Derbyshire behind her, her career taking her on an upward path - - she has been with the East Midlands Special Operations Unit for six months, and is less than thrilled to be back again. In a bit of one-upsmanship, she soon discovers a dead body in the old abandoned pub - - Ben’s office had received a call about a break-in there, but had yet to investigate.

With Ben’s upcoming marriage to Liz Petty, a civilian crime scene examiner, coming up in a few months, the distraction of the wedding plans in which his fiancée is immersed causes him not a little irritation.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Always a great crime story reader.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Keeley on July 14 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book and arrived quickly
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 38 reviews
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Marking time June 30 2012
By Maine Colonial - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
A challenge for a mystery series writer is to keep the protagonist's story moving along for regular readers, but still make it accessible to new readers who may come into the series without reading earlier books. In Dead and Buried, the 13th in the Ben Cooper/Diane Fry series set in the Peak District in England, author Stephen Booth has crafted a story that any new reader will have no trouble following. Unfortunately, those who have read earlier books in the series are likely to be frustrated by the unchanging negative dynamic in the relationship between Ben Cooper and Diane Fry.

Just when Fry thought she'd finally escaped Edendale, its sheep and all the colleagues she disdained in Edendale's CID, she's dragged back. She's now part of a regional Major Crimes unit, called in when evidence is found relating to the high-profile disappearance of a tourist couple on the moors near Edendale over two years earlier. That disappearance happened in a Christmastime blizzard, which is hard for Ben Cooper's imagination to picture now that it's a hot, dry summer and dangerous moorland fires keep popping up. The investigation takes on a new dimension when a local man is found murdered in the Lighthouse, a now-closed pub that was connected to the disappearance of the couple.

Ben Cooper, newly promoted to Detective Sergeant, is about to be married to Scene of Crime technician Liz Petty, and is a little distracted by all the wedding and house planning. But not so distracted as to fail to be annoyed at being put in an essentially subordinate position to Fry. For him, it's not so much that Diane is in an important position and is running the investigation, as that her elevation hasn't changed Diane a bit. She is still hostile to everyone on the Edendale force, including (or even especially) Ben. She never misses a chance to make sarcastic and demeaning remarks, to dismiss any suggestions made by anyone else and to let everyone know just what she thinks of Edendale and everyone in it. If anything, Diane's bad attitude is worse than ever.

The mystery story here was promising, but I found it too easy to figure out what happened and whodunnit---and I'm usually no genius at that sort of thing. There was a piece of the story line that was just dropped, as if it was a red herring, even though it felt more like an additional thread that would be pursued to a separate conclusion. And the ending was jarringly abrupt.

Booth's writing is vividly descriptive and was put to good use in this story, with the moorland wildfires playing a part throughout the book. Booth's descriptions of the smoke, sometimes insinuating and other times overwhelming and menacing, were evocative. I just wish he'd use his writing power to go somewhere new with Ben Cooper and Diane Fry, especially Fry. She's painted as a talented, but extremely bitter person who tries to make life as miserable for everyone around her as it seems to be for her. I'm just bored and annoyed with her nasty cracks and the way Ben Cooper seethes but never confronts her. We've been there, done that, all too many times at this point. I got the faintest glimmer at the end of the book that this stagnant negative dynamic may be about to change; that Ben's anger may boil over now. I hope that happens and that it's the catalyst for real change in the relationship between these two characters. I'll give Booth one more chance to make that happen.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The ending does not disappoint Nov. 14 2012
By Bobby D. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I am not a big reader of mysteries but do on occasion enjoy them and pick one up for light reading. Then I prefer true crime to the fictional version. I read the first book in Stephen Booth's series (Buried is his 13th in the series) "Black Dog" and now have skipped all the way to his latest book. The reason is mainly as a result of reading Mr. Booth's newsletter to readers where he talked about reader reaction to the ending of this latest book.

In this we find the Peak District burning with large wildfires. A body is found in a lone pub located on the moors which closed a few years earlier. Detective Cooper is involved in planning his wedding while working the case as he theorizes that this latest body it tied to the disappearance of two tourists two years earlier. Diane Fry his former partner has been promoted and is in charge of major crimes group. They compete in there attempts to solve both crimes.

The book weaves mostly as a procedural and is very intricately plotted with lots of possible suspects. And the ending does not disappoint and is going to lead readers to look forward to the next book in the series.

My wife was the one who discovered this writer and has books and I got involved when she found no US publisher was distributing his books. I found his email and he sent back a very nice note on where we could find his books on line and we subscribed to his newsletter. He seems very personable and extremely interested in his readers and the good news is that his books have been picked up by a US publisher. (Our copy of Bury the Dead was purchased on a trip to London.) I think if you like a good mystery that is not full of gore and perhaps in the old style of a who done it which also has a couple of interesting lead characters you will enjoy the series.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Dead and Buried Oct. 7 2012
By Gloria Feit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As this book opens, firefighters in the Peak District of England are fighting what seems to be a losing battle, trying to contain the flames engulfing this part of Derbyshire, with smoke covering acres and acres of the moors from the catastrophic wildfires that have been springing up, the worst seen in the area in decades, many undoubtedly the result of arson. But to D.S. Ben Cooper, his more immediate problem are the buried items found by the crew working one of the sites, and which appear to be clothing and other items - including a wallet and credit cards - which had belonged to a young couple who had seemingly disappeared over two years ago, in the middle of a snowstorm. They had last been seen in a local pub, with no trace found since, and the case, while no longer active, is as cold as it could be.

The Major Crime Unit is called in, and DS Diane Fry, Ben's old nemesis, is put in charge. [Diane had been his immediate supervisor before his promotion to detective sergeant.] Diane, for her part, couldn't be happier that she had, as she thought, put Derbyshire behind her, her career taking her on an upward path - - she has been with the East Midlands Special Operations Unit for six months, and is less than thrilled to be back again. In a bit of one-upsmanship, she soon discovers a dead body in the old abandoned pub - - Ben's office had received a call about a break-in there, but had yet to investigate.

With Ben's upcoming marriage to Liz Petty, a civilian crime scene examiner, coming up in a few months, the distraction of the wedding plans in which his fiancée is immersed causes him not a little irritation. Ben and the rest of his CID team at Derbyshire Constabulary E Division have their hands full, with the two investigations proceeding simultaneously, although Diane makes clear that the old case is her jurisdiction. Behind everything, the raging fires continue, a constant backdrop underlying everything which follows. The author's meticulous descriptions of the landscape make for a visceral sense of place.

Mr. Booth has once again created a suspenseful scenario, with many a twist and turn. This elegantly written novel is the 12th entry in the Cooper and Fry series, and at the end this reader reluctantly closed the book, fervently hoping it won't be the last.

Recommended.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
One of the best Cooper & Fry series I've read Oct. 3 2014
By Magus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Booth takes his writing to a new level in this Cooper & Fry novel - while it does involve murder, it really grabs you on the personal level. I'll not give away the ending but it made my heart stop for a moment. The conclusion to the murder(s) is not (nor is it ever with Booth's novels) a speech by an, oh, too clever, Inspector, but rather by you - the reader. Diane Fry turns up again (like a bad penny? Nah - I rather like her; sometimes) but this novel is mostly about the Ben Cooper that we all love.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Ben Cooper deserves some happiness! July 14 2013
By Colleen Sonnenberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was surprised by the ending of the previous novel - so I was eager to read Dead and Buried to see where Stephen Booth was going with this story line. I found it hard to see Ben so damaged [but isn't that what we love in so many of our characters], but happy to know that all is not lost. I found Diane getting a bit cliche - she needs to have more to say as opposed to the same old same old - getting tired of her [or how she is written]. But I loved this book [as usual], and will re-read it soon.


Feedback