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Dead Man [Import]


Price: CDN$ 15.95 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
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Frequently Bought Together

Dead Man [Import] + Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (Widescreen) [Import]
Price For Both: CDN$ 22.69

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Product Details

  • Actors: Johnny Depp
  • Directors: Jim Jarmusch
  • Format: Anamorphic, Black & White, Closed-captioned, Color, DVD-Video, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Alliance Films
  • Release Date: March 4 2003
  • Run Time: 121 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (188 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004Z4WX

Product Description

Dead Man

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Big Dog on Sept. 2 2000
Format: VHS Tape
How unfair is it that Tim Keogh of the Amazon.Com organization gets to lead off the list of reviews for this movie by stating - "This disappointment from Jim Jarmusch stars Johnny Depp in a mystery Western about a 19th-century accountant named William Blake, who spends his last coin getting to a hellish mud town in Texas and ends up penniless and doom struck in the wilderness." I don't know if Tim was busy stuffing his face with popcorn but he makes three erroneous statements in this first line of his totally off-base review.
1) This movie is not a mystery! 2) Johnny Depp spends his last coin buying whiskey. 3) The "hellish mud town" of Machine is on the West Coast - not Texas. (After all, it would take a while to ride by horseback from Texas to British Columbia where the Coastal Indian Tribes were located).
You may be asking yourself why I take issue with such mundane details? The answer is obvious - to prove the point that Tim Keogh wasn't even watching this movie, and therefore, has no right to review it. Simply put, Dead Man is a cinematic masterpiece! Jim Jarmusch has made a number of strong movies, but Dead Man surpasses the others as a brilliant work of art.
You can see by reading the other reviews that support for Dead Man borders on fanatical. There are few movies that I have watched repeatedly but I continue to see this one over and over again. Everything about the film is different from the conventions of Hollywood mass consumption "fast-film". The story unfolds in a slow and methodical manner and requires much attention on the part of the viewer. If you invest in it, Dead Man will repay you many times over.
If you liked Forrest Gump and The Sixth Sense then you can go see another mindless mainstream movie with Tim Keogh and the majority of the ignorant American public. If you need more than that . . . buy Dead Man. I'll bet you watch it more than once!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lynne Clarke on Dec 4 2003
Format: DVD
I never saw this on the big screen, but after watching the DVD I think it would have been great to hear Neil Young's music coming from all directions and see the brilliant photography on the big screen.
Dead Man, no doubt, will be loathed by some as being meandering and slow. However, I'm one who was thought this was absolutely brilliant. Some would probably describe this as just the story of someone who is fatally injured right at the beginning of the film and spends the rest of the time dying - and they'd be right - but it wouldn't do justice to the amazing acting of all concerned (esp. the bounty hunters - The talkative Michael Wincott - who still manages to keep talking after being shot about 6 times, and the scary, taciturn Lance Henrikson).
Johnny Depp (Bill Blake) yet again proves what a good actor he is, he was totally believable as the accountant who finds himself penniless and adrift in an totally alien world and his slow descent from a "stupid white man" to "killer of white men".
Gary Farmer was excellent as Nobody, an English-educated Indian with a love for Williams Blake's poetry and a desire to see Blake "return" to the spirit world in the proper way. There are also some great parts played by Alfred Molina as the missionary, Iggy Pop, Bill Bob Thornton, Gabriel Byrne, John Hurt etc., all of whom added to the surreal atmosphere.
The black and white photography is magical, the story is bleak, funny, shocking, uplifting and painful in equal parts.
If you like your films full of action and dont want to think too much about the plot - this one is definitely not for you. If you love films that can be interpreted on many levels, with interesting characters, great acting and wonderful photography, you may - just possibly - love this film.
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By Torval Mork TOP 500 REVIEWER on Nov. 23 2010
Format: DVD
If you aren't an accolylte of Jim Jarmusch (the director of Dead Man), you may find the pace of this film slow and tedious. On the other hand, if you appreciate the offerings of French New Wave film makers from the 60's and the gritty drama's of the 70's output from BBS (Five Easy Pieces, King of Marvin Gardens), you'll find it easy to dial into this surreal western setpiece.

From the outset, we are thrown headfirst into the reality of William Blake (Johnny Depp), on his way from Cleveland to the town of Machine on a steam train, where a job as an accountant in a mill called Dickinson Metal Works awaits him. En route, he encounters a few uncomfortable situations - most notably when an un-named coal shoveller from the locomotive (Crispin Glover) sits across from him and tests his wherewithal. A memorable line comes when suddenly the passengers leap from their seats, raise their shotguns and start firing out the window, and Glover's character spouts "They're shooting buffalo, government says they shot a million of them last year alone."

Upon his arrival in Machine, Blake finds that the job he travelled for has been filled, and the mill owner (Robert Mitchum) laughs him out of the office. From there, Blake finds misfortune after misfortune, while encountering a colorful pallete of characters on the way to a bitter conclusion.

The above provides a synopsis - but it hardly evokes the stellar storytelling and visual complexity conveyed by Jarmusch and longtime cinematographer Robby Muller (whose previous work includes films with Wim Wenders and Lars Von Trier). This is an indie tour de force on the most under the radar level.
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