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The Dead Travel Fast Paperback – Feb 16 2010


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Gifts for Grads




Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Mira; Original edition (Feb. 16 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0778327655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0778327653
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.2 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #574,211 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Edinburgh, 1858

"I am afraid we must settle the problem of what to do with Theodora," my brother-in-law said with a weary sigh. He looked past me to where my sister sat stitching placidly on a tiny gown. It had been worn four times already and wanted a bit of freshening.

Anna glanced up from her work to give me a fond look. "I rather think Theodora ought to have a say in that, William."

To his credit, he coloured slightly. "Of course she must." He sketched a tiny bow in my direction. "She is a woman grown, after all. But now that Professor Lestrange has been properly laid to rest, there is no one here to care for her. Something must be decided."

At the mention of my grandfather, I turned back to the bookshelf whose contents I had been sorting. His library had been an extensive one, and, to my anguish, his debts demanded it be sold along with anything else of value in the house. Indeed, the house itself would have to be sold, although William had hopes that the pretty little property in Picardy Place would fetch enough to settle the debts and leave me a tiny sum for my keep. I wiped the books carefully with a cloth sprinkled with neat's-foot oil and placed them aside, bidding farewell to old friends.

Just then the housekeeper, Mrs. Muldoon, bustled in. "The post, Miss Lestrange."

I sorted through the letters swiftly, passing the business correspondence to William. I kept only three for myself, two formal notes of condolence and the last, an odd, old-fashioned-looking letter written on thick, heavy paper and embellished with such exotic stamps and weighty wax seals that I knew at once who must have sent it. I hesitated to open it, savouring the pleasure of anticipation.

William showed no such restraint. He dashed a paper knife through the others, casting a quick eye over the contents.

"More debts," he said with a sigh. He reached for the ledger, entering the numbers with a careful hand. It was good of him to settle my grandfather's affairs so diligently, but at the moment I wanted nothing more than to be rid of him with his ledgers and his close questions about how best to dispose of a spinster sister-in-law of twenty-three.

Catching my mood, Anna smiled at her husband. "I find I am a little unwell. Perhaps some of Mrs. Muldoon's excellent ginger tea might help."

To his credit, William sprang up, all thoughts of me forgotten. "Of course." Naturally, neither of them alluded to the happy source of her sickness, and I wondered wickedly how happy the news had been. A fifth little mouth to feed on his modest living in a small parish. Anna for her part looked tired, her mouth drawn.

"Thank you," I told her when he had gone. I thrust my duster into my pocket and took up the paper knife. It seemed an act of sacrilege to destroy the seal, but I was wildly curious as to the contents.

Anna continued to stitch. "You must not be too impatient with William," she advised me as I began to read. "He does care for you, and he means well. He only wants to see you properly settled."

I mumbled a reply as I skimmed the letter, phrases catching my eye. My dearest friend, how I have missed you…at last he is coming to take up his inheritance… so much to be decided…

Anna chattered on for a few moments, trying to convince me of her husband's better qualities, I think. I scarce listened. Instead I began to read the letter a second time, more slowly, turning each word of the hasty scrawl over in my head.

"Deliverance," I breathed, sinking onto a hassock as my eyes lingered upon the last sentence. You must come to me.

"Theodora, what is it? Your colour has risen. Is it distressing news?"

After a moment, I found my voice. "Quite the opposite. Do you remember my school friend, Cosmina?"

Anna furrowed her brow. "Was she the girl who stayed behind during holidays with you?"

I had forgot that. After Anna had met and promptly married William at sixteen, I had been bereft. She had left us for his living in Derbyshire, and our little household never entirely recovered from the loss. She was but two years my senior, and we had been orphaned together in childhood. We had been each other's bulwark against the loneliness of growing up in an elderly scholar's household, and I had felt the loss of her keenly.

I had pined so deeply in fact, that my grandfather had feared for my health. Thinking it a cure, he sent me to a school for young ladies in Bavaria, and there I had met Cosmina. Like me, she did not make friends easily, and so we had clung to each other, both of us strangers in that land. We were serious, or so we thought ourselves, scorning the silliness of the other girls who talked only of beaux and debut balls. We had formed a fast friendship, forged stronger by the holidays spent at school when the other pupils who had fewer miles to travel had been collected by their families. Only a few of the mistresses remained to keep charge of us and a lively atmosphere always prevailed. We were taken on picnics and permitted to sit with them in the teachers' sitting room. We feasted on pastries and fat, crisp sausages, and were allowed to put aside our interminable needlework for once. No, we had not minded our exile, and many an evening we whiled away the hours telling tales of our homelands, for the mistresses had travelled little and were curious. They teased me fondly about hairy-kneed Highlanders and oat porridge while Cosmina made them shiver with stories of the vampires and werewolves that stalked her native Transylvania.

I collected myself from my reverie. "Yes, she was. She always spoke so bewitchingly of her home. She lives in a castle in the Carpathians, you know. She is kin to a noble family there." I brandished the letter. "She is to be married, and she begs me to come and stay through Christmas."

"Christmas! That is months away. What will you do with yourself for so long in…goodness, I do not even know what country it is!"

I shrugged. "It is its own country, a principality or some such. Part of the Austrian Empire, if I remember rightly."

"But what will you do?" Anna persisted.

I folded the letter carefully and slipped it into my pocket. I could feel it through my petticoats and crinoline, a talisman against the worries that had assailed me since my grandfather had fallen ill.

"I shall write," I said stoutly.

Anna primmed her lips and returned to her needlework.

I went and knelt before her, taking her hands in mine, heedless of the prick of the needle. "I know you do not approve, but I have had some success. It wants only a proper novel for me to be established in a career where I can make my own way. I need be dependent upon no one."

She shook her head. "My darling girl, you must know this is not necessary. You will always have a home with us."

I opened my mouth to retort, then bit the words off sharply. I might have wounded her with them. How could I express to her the horror such a prospect raised within me? The thought of living in her small house with four—now five!—children underfoot, too little money to speak to the expenses, and always William, kindly but disapproving. He had already made his feelings towards women writers quite clear. They were unyielding as stone; he would permit no flexibility upon the point. Writing aroused the passions and was not a suitable occupation for a lady. He would not even allow my sister to read any novel he had not vetted first, reading it carefully and marking out offending passages. The Brontës were forbidden entirely on the grounds that they were "unfettered." Was this to be my future then? Quiet domesticity with a man who would deny me the intellectual freedoms I had nurtured for so long in favour of sewing sheets and wiping moist noses?

No, it was not to be borne. There was no possibility of earning my own keep if I lived with them, and the little money I should have from my grandfather's estate would not sustain me long. I needed only a bit of time and some quiet place to write a full-length novel and build upon the modest success I had already enjoyed as a writer of suspenseful stories.

I drew in a calming breath. "I am grateful to you and to William for your generous offer," I began, "but it cannot be. We are different creatures, Anna, as different as chalk and cheese, and what suits you should stifle me just as my dreams would shock and frighten you."

To my surprise, she merely smiled. "I am not so easily shocked as all that. I know you better than you credit me. I know you long to have adventures, to explore, to meet interesting people and tell thrilling tales. You were always so, even from an infant. I remember you well, walking up to people and thrusting out your hand by way of introduction. You never knew a stranger, and you spent all your time quizzing everyone. Why did Mama give away her cherry frock after wearing it only twice? Why could we not have a monkey to call for tea?" She shook her head, her expression one of sweet indulgence. "You only stopped chattering when you were asleep. It was quite exhausting."

"I do not remember, but I am glad you told me." It had been a long time since Anna and I had shared sisterly confidences. I had seen her so seldom since her marriage. But sometimes, very occasionally, it felt like old times again and I could forget William and the children and the little vicarage that all had better claims upon my sister.

"You would not remember. You were very small. But then you changed after Papa died, became so quiet and close. You lost the trick of making friends. But I still recall the child you were, your clever antics. Papa used to laugh and say he ought to have called you Theodore, for you were fearless as any boy."

"Did he? I scarce remember him anymore. Or Mama. It's been just us for so long."

"And Grandfather," she said with a smile of gentle affection. "Tell me about the funeral. I was v...

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By Misfit TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 7 2010
Format: Paperback
Or is there something else going on here? Theodora Lestrange's childhood school mate Cosmina is set to marry a distant cousin, Count Andrei Dragulescu, at his castle high in the Carpathian Mountains. Theodora is soon swept up into a web of intrigue and mystery over Andrei's dead father (do the dead walk at night?), a local villager who disappears into the forest to howl at the full moon (or does he?), a maid found dead with the marks of a vampire's fangs (or is it something else?) and more.

Of course the ever so sensuous Count has no interest in his betrothed but can't keep his hands and lips off our heroine. Will she succumb to his charms? And if she does, will those be kisses she receives or something more sinister? Is he one of the Strigoi or is it all smoke and mirrors?

Well you know I'm not telling. This was a light, easy-breezy read with plenty of creepy moments that kept me guessing at the mystery until almost the last pages. Theodora was just spunky and intelligent enough without going OTT in modern behavior and as for Andrei? I wouldn't mind having one of him for my own. I have to admit to being one of the few people left on the planet who haven't yet read Raybourn's other books, so I don't have those books to compare to as other reviewers have done. Three stars.
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Format: Paperback
Even with my issues with the characters, it was the plot which let me down. The plot was rife with anachronisms, clichés and coincidences. However, on the plus side, there were some scenes that were very well done, I personally like the inclusion of references to and the poetry of Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du Mal being a particular favorite of mine, and I particularly appreciate her explanation for some of the 'supernatural' events.

All this being said, it wasn't a terrible book. Unfortunately, it wasn't a good book either. Having read Ms. Raybourn's other books, I believe much of my disappointment comes from knowing she is a much better writer than this would indicate.

THE DEAD TRAVEL FAST (Gothic/Susp-Theodora Lastrange-Transylvania-Victorian/1858) ' Okay
Raybourn, Deanna ' Standalone
Mira, 2010, Trade paperback ' ISBN: 9780778327653
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 134 reviews
53 of 56 people found the following review helpful
Shades of (Lady Julia) Grey Feb. 17 2010
By Ellis Bell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Theodora Lestrange is a budding author who receives an invitation from her friend, Cosmina, to stay in her fiancee's castle in Transylvania. Seeing this as the perfect opportunity to gain inspiration for the novel she's always wanted to write, Theodora goes to Transylvania--and finds herself immediately attracted to the castle's owner, count Andrei Dragulescu.

I'm not quite as fond of this novel as I am of Raybourn's Lady Julia Grey series, and I'll tell you why. Theodora Lestrange is a pale copy of Lady Julia, I'm afraid, unrestrainedly modern and not quite as interesting. There's not quite the same amount of wittiness that Lady Julia gave us time after time. There are also a lot of discrepancies in her character, especially when it came to her friendship with Cosmina.

I can't help but compare this romance to the one between Lady Julia and Brisbane in Raybourn's Silent series. I think the problem lies in the fact that, whereas the Lady Julia-Brisbane romance had time to evolve over a few novels, here the romance aspect simply seems rushed, and based more upon physical chemistry rather than emotional or mental (how many times are we told about how physically attractive the count is?). We're told over and over that there's a mental connection, but I'd rather see it firsthand.

I loved the premise of the book, and I wish that there had been more of the supernatural in it. Theodora is the ultimate skeptic, I know, but I would have liked to have seen more vampires, werewolves, strigoi, or whatever. This book had the potential to be extremely scary, but I thought it fell down in that aspect. Also (and this is a minor point but it annoyed me all the same), the author is very selective about the British spellings she uses (why "faery," for example, and not "mediaeval?").

Deanna Raybourn is a talented writer, and she knows her Victorian period extremely well. She's obviously put a lot of time and energy into the research and writing of this book, but I for one can't wait until she returns to the Lady Julia Grey series. If you're a newcomer to Deanna Rayboun's novels, this is probably not the place to start.
42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
Whoops. This was a big surprise. Feb. 21 2010
By OLT - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
So, a big fan of the three Lady Julia Grey novels by Deanna Raybourn, I preordered this book long ago, assuming it was the fourth Lady Julia book (I guess we know what that makes me) and forgot about it. It arrives this week and turns out to be a Gothic/vampire/werewolf plot, not my favorite genre. But I read it anyway, having paid for it and also being, as said, a big fan of Raybourn's other novels. And, to my surprise, I liked it. I found it to be well written, perhaps the characters not as well developed and three-dimensional as they could be, but the plot was fun, had a couple of unexpected things that happened, and, in general, the book could be read by someone who does not like the paranormal and prefers things that happen in the world to not be otherworldly. It has romance, mystery and murder. Could you ask for more?
21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
No Lady Julia I Fear Feb. 17 2010
By Sally - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Theodora Lestrange has just lost her adored grandfather and is left with a handful of unappealing yet sensible choices for her near future, when an old school friend extends an invitation to visit her in Transylvania. The independence of the journey and the exoticism of the destination beckon to this young writer and she departs for the myths and mysteries of Eastern Europe with scarcely a thought for her safety and well-being. Once there, she meets with the requisite assortment of intriguing characters, including the reclusive and mysterious Count Andrei.

Sadly, the characterizations in this novel, unlike in the Lady Julia series, are not particularly well developed. The attraction between the main characters seems inexplicable or unbelievable. I personally love the Lady Julia series (in spite of the unfortunate cover art in the more recent editions) but this is a pale shadow of that richly developed world. The
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Angieville: THE DEAD TRAVEL FAST March 1 2010
By Angela Thompson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
For the last couple of weeks I've been obsessively checking my local bookstore's stock online to see if Deanna Raybourn's THE DEAD TRAVEL FAST just happened to get in early. Yes, I actually am that nerdy and it's much too late to do anything about it. But, in this case, the effort paid off as a nice, healthy stack of them awaited me on the "New Fiction" table when I dashed in from the rain on my way home from work. As you know, I am a devoted Lady Julia Grey fan. I adore that series and am anxiously awaiting the upcoming fourth installment--Dark Road to Darjeeling--due out this October. But when I heard she was working on a standalone historical set in Transylvania and featuring a would-be lady novelist and a mysterious count...well...I was equal parts intrigued and excited. Who knew what delights and promises it would hold?

Miss Theodora LeStrange has come to the end of her rope. When her grandfather and guardian passes away, her well-meaning if rather insipid brother-in-law takes it upon himself to determine what exactly is to be done with her. Terrified of what he will come up with, Theodora grasps at the nearest straw in the form of a letter from her old school friend Cosmina who now resides at Castle Dragulescu in Transylvania. She invites Theodora to come and stay in celebration of her approaching nuptials. A budding novelist, Theodora convinces her friend and publisher Charles Beecroft the experience will serve to inspire her imagination and fuel the novel she knows is lurking inside just waiting to be brought forth. Against their better judgement, her family and friends let her go and the adventure of a lifetime begins. Upon arrival Theodora is reunited with Cosmina and introduced to the aging Countess and her mysterious son--the newly appointed Count. In a land where the sinister is a daily occurrence and the horrifying merely commonplace, Theodora's imagination is more than stimulated. It is driven into overdrive as her Scottish pragmatism wars with the inexplicable and increasingly nightmarish events unfolding in this small Roumanian village at the edge of the world.

This was such an interesting read. It was at times exactly and not at all what I expected and my response to it evolved as the pages turned. I liked Theodora from the beginning. She is much more pragmatic, yet somehow less sure of herself than Julia Grey and I wondered how she would handle the--what seemed to me--clearly supernatural events at Castle Dragulescu. But just when you (and she) think you have the story and Count Andrei figured out, the narrative takes a meditative turn and you find yourself not at all sure. Perhaps it is merely smoke and mirrors and can all be explained away by an ancient grudge, a marital infidelity, or a genetic predisposition. And so the tale winds on, weaving back and forth between the mundane and the spectacular, never revealing its secrets. At first I was impatient to discover the truth, but it was when I gave myself up to the story that I enjoyed Deanna Raybourn's wonderfully gifted way with words. I was amazed at how seamless the writing and the dialogue were. Initially I wanted to like Andrei as much as I do Brisbane, but he is an entirely different breed of alpha male and not nearly as instantly likable. But he isn't meant to be, I don't think. Much more Rochester than Thornton from the word go. And once again, it was when I sat back and let it wash over me that I really was able to appreciate this novel for what it is--a pitch-perfect Victorian Gothic romance. And the ending was perfect. What a talent for endings Ms. Raybourn has and how much I look forward to each of her books--whatever style or genre they may be.

A Note: For Lady Julia Grey aficionados, there is a delightful little reference to that series hidden in THE DEAD TRAVEL FAST. It left a happily satisfied smile on my face. See if you can spot it.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
a bit dull April 11 2010
By Neker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product
I feel like the black sheep here. The story is about an old maid, Theodora, who is invited by an old boarding school friend to visit Rumania. Apparenlty her friend, Cosmina (what an awful and corney name), was planning a wedding and wanted her there. Theodora, without a backward glace went. Upon arriving at the castle of Count Dragulecus (another awful and corney name), she discovers that her friend is not engaged and the Count has the hots for her. Why? You got me.

I think Rayborn was trying to create a creepy horror story. When I started reading the book and read the names and premises of the story I thought she was creating a corney funny take on Dracula. As I read further I realized that she was not, and was trying to actually be serious. I think she would have been better off in her writing if it was all just a joke. My other problem, Raybourn did not show the reader anything. She simply stated facts. Like when she had Theodora brag about herself and her expert writing ability. Who does that? I also hated the first person point of view. Theodora was not a strong character. More wishy-washy. "Do I stay. Do I leave. I will ignore and stay away from the count. Oh, no he's not coming to get me out of my room so we can spend most of the night alone together."

Raybourn also attempted to create a murder mystery in the story. When it was obvious what was really going on. Then there is the character of the count. I mean was I suppose to be surprised about the ending when he simply told her one night around page 100 that he was just pretending to be what she wanted so that she could become another of his conquest? Also, showing how weak the character of Theodora was to put up with it. I thought she was suppose to be intelligent?

I wouldn't recommend this book to read.


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