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Deadline [Mass Market Paperback]

Mira Grant
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Book Description

June 1 2011 The Newsflesh Trilogy (Book 2)
Shaun Mason is a man without a mission. Not even running the news organization he built with his sister has the same urgency as it used to. Playing with dead things just doesn't seem as fun when you've lost as much as he has.

But when a CDC researcher fakes her own death and appears on his doorstep with a ravenous pack of zombies in tow, Shaun has a newfound interest in life. Because she brings news-he may have put down the monster who attacked them, but the conspiracy is far from dead.

Now, Shaun hits the road to find what truth can be found at the end of a shotgun.

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Deadline + Blackout + Feed (Newsflesh, Book 1)
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'This book is fast-paced and so well written it makes you check your doors and windows are locked and peer into the dark corners looking for zombies... I really would recommend this book to anyone and everyone who likes the supernatural/fantasy gene; it's just a fantastic read that I found hard to put down with a really twisted ending leaving the reader wanting more.' DARK MATTER [An] adrenaline-packed, quick-witted tale of medicine and mayhem ... Deft cultural touches, intriguing science and amped-up action will delight Grant's numerous fans PUBLISHERS WEEKLY 'This was an absolutely excellent continuation of this series. Things that happen in this book will absolutely take your breath away; it is absolutely engaging and really makes you think... Personally, I think this is the best zombie-themed writing since World War Z' FRINGE --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Mira Grant lives in California, sleeps with a machete under her bed, and highly suggests you do the same. Mira Grant is the pseudonym of Seanan McGuire -- winner of the 2010 John W. Campbell Award for best new writer. Find out more about the author at www.miragrant.com or follow her on twitter @seananmcguire.

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3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the first July 22 2013
By Dennis Madison TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
SPOILER ALERTS if you haven't read the first book!

I must say I was disappointed with this second of three books in the Newsflesh Trilogy. I found the story less intriguing and I missed the George character from the first book. It seemed that this book was just laying the foundation for the third book. I found myself reading this just to get through it so I could be done.
Despite this, I found myself ordering the third book since the chapter sample for it seemed promising and that I'd already invested a lot time in the series.
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Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  160 reviews
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Into The Head of Shaun Mason *Spoiler Alert* Aug. 10 2011
By Shroud Magazine's Book Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
*Warning, this review contains spoilers for FEED, the preceding book in Mira Grant's Newsflesh trilogy read the review here ([...]), then read that book first.*

It sucks to be the second part of a trilogy. The first part is young and impetuous, the vibrant child introducing us to new worlds and people while establishing the broad conflict. The last one is older, more mature, bringing it all together and providing us with a sense of closure. All the middle kids does is get everyone into as much trouble as possible.

Boy, howdy does DEADLINE do that.

Picking up scant months after the events of FEED, we're plopped into the head of Shaun Mason as he barely holds the crew of After the End Times together. The ghost of his dead sister is in his head, an officially deceased CDC researcher is in his apartment and his city is overrun with the hungry amplified. This new addition to the group has information that someone is willing to firebomb the entirety of Oakland to keep secret. It would appear that the conspiracy behind his sister's death is alive and Shaun will stop at nothing to get at the heart of the matter.

Everything that made FEED my favorite novel of last year, as well as my second favorite zombie novel of all time, is still here: political intrigue, in-depth and honest characters that work their way into your heart and life, spot on social commentary on the way we live under the threat of a terror state and some damn fine "hold onto your britches while you fill them with poo" action. Of course, Mira continues to ratchet up the tension with the increasingly tightening noose around the necks of our intrepid newsies. Her previously proven Whedonesque willingness to kill off any character, no matter how important they may seem, certainly kept me on my toes in that regard.

I specifically enjoyed the change in POV from FEED's supremely self-assured and driven Georgia to the increasingly apathetic and uncertain Shaun. His feelings of inadequacy and mental breakdown (he doesn't just talk to his dead sis, she argues back) provide the heavy emotional impact this go round. The world around and within him is collapsing into chaos and you'll feel every moment.

Sure, it will leave you hanging in the air once the last page is turned, but that is what middle children do. Also, there's a revelation near the end that I want to call cheap but it does fit with the information we are provided earlier and I'm curious to see how it will play out in BLACKOUT. Overall, it's a hell of a worthy followup to FEED that had me tearing through the pages and left me salivating more. What else can you ask for?

Reviewed by Shroud's Anton Cancre
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intensely emotional, action-packed adventure. With zombies. Sept. 17 2011
By Wendy Darling - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This review does not contain spoilers for either FEED or DEADLINE. One year has passed since Shaun and Georgia Mason found more than they bargained for as they investigated the truth behind the Kellis-Amberlee virus, a mutated cure for human disease that led to the uprising of the dead. The events that transpired then have an enormous impact now as the high-profile bloggers from After the End of Times uncover a conspiracy that is even bigger than they ever imagined. A CDC researcher fakes her own death in a spectacular fashion and shows up at their headquarters, and soon the whole team is battling zombies, mutant dogs, and the ever-present ghosts of their past.

When I finished this book late last night, my thoughts were "I have not a single criticism to offer. Not a single one." And this still holds true. Without exception, every question and doubt I raised with Feed (Newsflesh, Book 1) is answered here. The action is incredibly intense, the story is densely and intricately plotted, and the book is exceptionally well-paced and exciting. Readers who are leery of zombies still shouldn't have much of a problem, because although there are more tense encounters with the undead, the violence is relatively contained and there are no gross or gratuitous scenes. Most of the terror comes from heart-pounding action and chase sequences, as well as the knowledge of the overwhelming consequences if the team fails in its quest for truth and justice.

Shaun, Georgia, and Buffy all loom large in this sequel, but we also get to know the other staffers better, including the elegant Mahir, the fiercely determined Becks, the quietly steady Alaric, and the sad, tragic Maggie. Most significantly, however, the narrator has shifted to Shaun, whose personality comes through loud and clear in his bitterly funny words, his decisive handling of his team, and his desperately emotional struggle to hang onto what he loves most. Mira Grant met and exceeded every expectation I had for this book, particularly in the devastating truth that comes to light about what might have been. I knew from Feed to expect an emotional reaction, but I could not have prepared myself for the terrible knowledge that these characters have to face. I was literally whimpering from the pain, and tears were streaming so hard that I couldn't see the page.

This is a searingly intelligent novel, with hard questions about medical ethics, government responsibility, and the nobility and folly of human nature. And just when you think the author has delivered everything she possibly could, there is a HUGE twist at the end that made me bolt upright and scream in the middle of the night. This twist has far-reaching consequences for both the characters and for society as a whole, and it also answered questions I had about the future in a crazy and unthinkable way.

It will be another year before the third book in this trilogy will be released, and I'll spend much of that time waiting in agony to find out what happens to the characters I've come to care about so much. But oh my stars, what a pleasure it is to be so incredibly excited and thrilled and moved by an author's work.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blew Me Away June 21 2013
By Christina (A Reader of Fictions) - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Do you ever read a book and think: "I just want to be best friends with the author. Can we just hang out and I can soak up her/his brillance? Pretty please?" Other people think this way, right? This is how I feel about Mira Grant. I declare myself a fan girl with pride.

Feed was one of my very favorite books that I read in 2011. I loved it, and it caught me largely by surprise, because anything with a designation of horror makes me skeptical, since I'm the biggest wimp ever. However, I was immediately charmed by Georgia's intelligence, sarcasm, and hatred of people. Whenever I love the first book in a series that much, I worry that the next one will be a disappointment. I mean, how can it be as good? Well, just let me say that literally from the quotes before the first chapter, my worries vanished. I knew from the beauty of the writing that I would love this one just as much...and I did.

These books are pretty massive, roughly 600 pages each, so they take some reading, even for a speed demon like myself. The world building in this series is freaking mind-blowing. I cannot even put into words how good it is. Grant has so many details, all intricately woven so it never feels like you're sitting back for fifty years of exposition. Well, at least, that's how I feel. I know some readers have been turned off by all of the focus on politics and science, but I loved that, even though science and politics are pretty much at the top of the list of things I hate.

Despite the length, I really never felt like the plot of Deadline dragged. I was constantly eager to keep moving and find out what was going to happen next. This book made me cry, made me laugh, made me seriously concerned for the state of humanity, and made me go WTF just happened (Ending, you were cray...why do I not have Blackout now?). You should definitely watch out for Grant's humor, which can be found throughout. She has this great, dark sense of humor that just kills me. For example, she describes grocery shopping in the post-Rising world as "not an activity for the faint of heart" (345). Yes, you do learn about grocery shopping in a zombie-afflicted world. The characters are all vibrant and feel so real. In a lot of ways, her style reminds me of Joss Whedon. Just saying.

At this point, I'm going tell all you peeps who haven't read Feed to bounce. Either go read my review for that book or, even better, GO BUY FEED AND READ IT RIGHT NOW. The rest of this review will have crazy insane SPOILERS for Feed (not for Deadline), so I really don't want anyone without any knowledge of book one continuing on. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

Now, folks who read Feed, that ending was insane, right? Talk about a book that stayed with me. I usually forget endings but I did not forget that for sure. WAAAAHHHHH! I love that Grant wasn't afraid to kill off the MC. I mean, that's just badass, but it's also difficult to recover from, which is why you don't often see it. This, too, explains my initial fear of this book; a narrator switch was compulsory and I adored George. Well, thankfully, Shaun totally works as a narrator. You even get some George, because, check it, all those happenings have officially pushed Shaun over the edge of sanity into crazy town. He's now hearing George in his mind, and not just through memories.

Usually, this is not a plot line I would be able to handle, but Grant has done it so well. See, the thing is that George and Shaun had only each other for so many years. They are more closely bound to one another than Heathcliff and Catherine, on top of being a million times less obnoxious. Because of this, it makes sense that he can't let her go completely. In fact, the only thing keeping him going is his need for revenge on whoever orchestrated her death, because Shaun's not buying Tate as a mastermind. Where Feed delved into corruption in politics, Deadline focuses on the medical profession, and the truths of Kellis-Amberlee. I don't want to go into any more detail than that, because that might detract from your joy on the journey. Just know that it's amazing.

Mira Grant's Newsflesh Trilogy is, without a doubt, my favorite zombie fiction. With complete honesty, I can think of NOTHING that I would like to change about them. I could open the book up at random to any page, any of them, and find a quote I love. For me, the writing, tone, pacing, humor, world and characters are all absolutely perfect.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars excellent with some unresolved issues, i.e., sequelitis Nov. 2 2011
By Erin Satie - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
One bad thing about George dying at the end of FEED is that her death left Shaun to narrate the sequel, DEADLINE. I wasn't sure I wanted to read a book written entirely from Shaun's point of view. Especially not depressed, grief-maddened Shaun, who's not nearly as much fun as comic-relief Irwin Shaun was.

One good thing about George dying at the end of FEED is that I knew from the first page of DEADLINE that Mira Grant doesn't pull her punches. I knew I couldn't count on her to keep beloved characters safe or even safely on the "good" side of the moral line in the sand. I expected some crazy twists and turns, and I wasn't quite so gutted when they came along. Or, on the downside, quite so surprised.

And on the one hand, Deadline is seriously awesome. The main plot picks up on one of the unexplored element of FEED that I badly wanted to know more about - already a good sign - namely the reservoir conditions, like George's ocular Kellis-Amberlee. What spurs those conditions, what do they mean for the overall evolution of the virus? The answer, DEADLINE'S first really killer twist, sends Shaun on a hunt for more information that ultimately blows the conspiracy he (and George) had begun to crack in FEED wide open.

But for all that, I'm not ready to pass judgment on DEADLINE. I'm not ready to call it a success. It leaves too many questions unanswered.

For example: In DEADLINE, Georgia lives on in Shaun's mind as a figment of his imagination. She chats with him, they have conversations. Everyone, even Shaun, sees this as a sign of mental illness. He can't let go, he can't move on, so instead he has a relationship with an imaginary Georgia.

But throughout the novel, Georgia supplies ideas and information that Shaun couldn't generate on his own. She knows facts that he wouldn't remember, processes information faster than he would, and remembers character quirks about their friends and employees that he never knew. She seems like an independent entity, and Shaun doesn't seem crazy. Even his willingness to admit that he's crazy is proof that he's not crazy.

I know that the NEWSFLESH series are zombie books, so clearly there's an element of the magical or impossible, but that's why I appreciate Mira Grant's incessant discussion of virology. Aside from the fact that I find it interesting, it's kind of like a pledge. She's promising to keep her alternate reality as real as possible. She tells us about things like yellow fever and malaria to reassure us that she's basing her pseudo-science on real world phenomena.

So what's up with George in Shaun's head? There's no realism or pseudo-science to her disembodied voice. It's impossible. I hope Mira Grant has a good explanation for this, but until I hear it I'm going to be worried that there's a huge element of the book that's impossible and magical and makes no sense.

There are other examples, but that's the biggest and the safest to discuss, since it's present from the beginning.

FEED could have been a standalone novel. It felt like one to me. DEADLINE is not just a sequel, it's an obvious link in a chain. That makes it less impressive in some ways, but has the potential to make the series as a whole much stronger. By the end of the book, the post-Rising status quo is over. Add up all the revelations and all the curveballs, and there's an endgame in sight. The zombies are going to take over or they're going to lose everything. And, whoever's narrating, Grant is going to keep us in the thick of it.
35 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Trilogies" should be outlawed - unless they are written in advance July 11 2011
By L Crawford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I love the world that Feed/Deadline has created. It is a great idea and I like the parallels to our fear driven world today.

But, after the way the first book, ended, I wasn't sure I would read the second. I didn't like the shift in narrative, without a shift of style at the end of Feed and didn't know if I wanted to read a Shaun-centric story.

But, I decided to give it a go anyway, and it started out reasonably well. Shaun is insane and he's the group's leader. The conspiracy left unresolved at the end of Feed gets bigger. They uncover even bigger scoops.

And, then things get stupid.

Our intrepid investigative journalists spend lots of time investigating, but not publishing their facts, which is the only way the plot continues to work since a conspiracy to shut you up only works if you don't talk.

Then, the plot bogs down into a lot of milling around and it becomes obvious that at least the last 15-20% of the book is just random filler, and presumably, a set up for a third book.

Then, a big development comes out of left field, and again, our journalists don't seem to do much with the info they have on it. Info, by the way, that they probably shouldn't have since it seems to require that Shaun suddenly become a scientific genius when he's been dumb as a box of rocks through most of the story. Then, we finally get a zombie attack just to set up a plot device and then the book ends. Notice how I didn't mention anything getting resolved. It just ends.

I'm hoping the "preview" of the third book is a joke (or at least something the author reconsiders and takes back) because it is laughably bad. I doubt I'll read the third book based on the bad taste left by the end of this one and the ridiculous preview.

If you like the world created by Feed, you might want to read this book. If you expect anything to be resolved, you'll be disappointed since the author seems more interested in setting up a third book than crafting a strong second one.
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